Pinus sylvestris
Pinus sylvestris

Courses

Dr. Donald J. Leopold
Distinguished Teaching Professor and Chair
Department of Environmental and Forest Biology
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

email: djleopold@esf.edu
website: http://www.esf.edu/efb/faculty/leopold.htm

EFB 336 | EFB 542

EFB 336 Dendrology I - COURSE ORGANIZATION

Instructor: Dr. Donald J. Leopold,

 242 Illick, 470-6760

email: djleopold@esf.edu

website: http://www.esf.edu/efb/faculty/leopold.htm

Office Hours:MW 9:35 to 10:35 am and by appointment.

Objectives of Course:

(1)Introduce student to ~15% of the tree species in North America (these 15% comprise ~85% of the forest cover);

(2)In lecture, discuss silvical characteristics, ecological relationships, natural history, economic importance, wildlife relationships, and insect and disease problems of trees covered;

(3)In lab, learn key identification characteristics (of leaves, bark, form, fruit, buds, twigs) and taxonomic relationships of each species;and,

(4)Teach skills in field and lab so that other species can be learned independently.

Laboratory Open Hours:Monday - Friday, 8 am - 10 pm, unless lab is scheduled.

Lecture Meetings:Mondays and Wednesdays 8:25-9:20 am

Exam Schedule:See A7 for lecture tests.Field tests begin the second lab.

Field/Lab Meetings:See A8

Textbooks:HARLOW AND HARRAR'S TEXTBOOK OF DENDROLOGY, Hardin et al. 2001, 9th ed., paperback (earlier editions are okay), bookstores

FRUIT KEY AND TWIG KEY, Harlow, bookstores

DENDROLOGY WORKBOOK, Bray Hall

Also of Interest:

Trees of New York State. Native and Naturalized. D.J. Leopold, Syracuse University Press, 2003, 336 pages

Native Plants of the Northeast. A Guide for Gardening & Conservation. D.J. Leopold, Timber Press, 2005, 308 pages

Trees of the Central Hardwood Forests of North America. An Identification and Cultivation Guide. D.J. Leopold, W.C. McComb, and R.N. Muller, Timber Press, 1998, 469 pages

Native Trees of the Southeast. L.K. Kirkman, C.L. Brown, and D.J. Leopold, Timber Press, 2007, 370 pages

A Natural History of Trees (one volume on eastern, another on western trees). D.C. Peattie, Houghton Mifflin Company, 1991

Silvics of North America. Vols. 1 and 2, free on line at:

http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm

Supplies Needed:10X hand lens, small pocket knife

Expected Classroom Behavior

Each student is expected to:

Arrive to lecture by the time it begins (i.e., 8:25 am), otherwise please do not come at all unless the circumstances are beyond your control. I begin class when it is scheduled to begin.

Stay until class is over (i.e., 9:20 am).I do not go past the scheduled end time.

Sit towards the front half of the auditorium.

Have your cell phone ringer turned off.

Not be surfing the web, instant or text messaging, or doing anything else other than paying attention to the lecture.

Not be conducting any conversation during the lecture, unless it is part of the class.

 

   

EFB 336 TREE SPECIES LIST

Page1 Scientific Name Family Common Name Page2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
Populus tremuloides
Populus balsamifera
Betula papyrifera
Pinus banksiana
Larix laricina
Picea mariana
Picea glauca
Abies balsamea
Betula alleghaniensis
Betula populifolia
Fagus grandifolia
Acer saccharum
Pinus strobus
Pinus resinosa
Pinus sylvestris
Picea rubens
Picea abies
Tsuga canadensis
Thuja occidentalis
Salix nigra
Populus deltoides
Juglans nigra
Juglans cinerea
Carya ovata
Carya cordiformis
Ostrya virginiana
Quercus alba
Quercus macrocarpa
Quercus rubra
Quercus velutina
Quercus palustris
Ulmus americana
Celtis occidentalis
Magnolia acuminata
Liriodendron tulipifera
Sassafras albidum
Platanus occidentalis
Prunus serotina
Gleditsia triacanthos
Robinia pseudoacacia
Acer rubrum
Acer saccharinum
Acer negundo
Tilia americana
Nyssa sylvatica
Cornus florida
Diospyros virginiana
Fraxinus americana
Pinus rigida
Juniperus virginiana
Quercus phellos
Quercus nigra
Liquidambar styraciflua
Ilex opaca
Pinus echinata
Pinus taeda
Pinus elliottii
Pinus palustris
Taxodium distichum
Chamaecyparis thyoides
Pinus flexilis
Pinus ponderosa
Pinus contorta
Picea engelmannii
Picea pungens
Abies lasiocarpa
Abies concolor
Pseudotsuga menziesii
Pinus edulis
Cupressus arizonica
Umbellularia californica
Pinus lambertiana
Pinus sabiniana
Abies magnifica
Sequoia sempervirens
Sequoiadendron giganteum
Calocedrus decurrens
Chamaecyparis lawsoniana
Alnus rubra
Pinus monticola
Picea sitchensis
Tsuga heterophylla
Abies grandis
Thuja plicata
Salicaceae
Salicaceae
Betulaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Betulaceae
Betulaceae
Fagaceae
Aceraceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Cupressaceae
Salicaceae
Salicaceae
Juglandaceae
Juglandaceae
Juglandaceae
Juglandaceae
Betulaceae
Fagaceae
Fagaceae
Fagaceae
Fagaceae
Fagaceae
Ulmaceae
Ulmaceae
Magnoliaceae
Magnoliaceae
Lauraceae
Platanaceae
Rosaceae
Caesalpiniaceae
Fabaceae
Aceraceae
Aceraceae
Aceraceae
Tiliaceae
Nyssaceae
Cornaceae
Ebenaceae
Oleaceae
Pinaceae
Cupressaceae
Fagaceae
Fagaceae
Hamamelidaceae
Aquifoliaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Taxodiaceae
Cupressaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Cupressaceae
Lauraceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Taxodiaceae
Taxodiaceae
Cupressaceae
Cupressaceae
Betulaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Pinaceae
Cupressaceae
quaking aspen
balsam poplar
paper birch
jack pine
tamarack, eastern larch
black spruce
white spruce
balsam fir
yellow birch
gray birch
American beech
sugar maple
eastern white pine
red pine
Scotch pine
red spruce
Norway spruce
eastern hemlock
northern white-cedar
black willow
eastern cottonwood
black walnut
butternut, white walnut
shagbark hickory
bitternut hickory
eastern hophornbeam
white oak
bur oak
northern red oak
black oak
pin oak
American elm
hackberry
cucumbertree
yellow-poplar
sassafras
American sycamore
black cherry
honeylocust
black locust
red maple
silver maple
boxelder
American basswood
blackgum, black tupelo
flowering dpgwood
persimmon
white ash
pitch pine
eastern redcedar
willow oak
water oak
sweetgum
American holly
shortleaf pine
loblolly pine
slash pine
longleaf pine
baldcypress
Atlantic white-cedar
limber pine
ponderosa pine
lodgepole pine
Engelmann spruce
blue spruce
subalpine fir
white fir
Douglas-fir
pinyon
Arizona cypress
California-laurel
sugar pine
digger pine
California red fir
redwood
giant sequoia
incense-cedar
Port-Orford-cedar
red alder
western white pine
Sitka spruce
western hemlock
grand fir
western red cedar
385
389
362
129
152
162
164
185
358
365
300
440
98
134
136
159
157
177
219
382
391
278
280
283
295
371
311
314
331
334
342
263
271
241
246
252
254
405
412
416
445
449
452
376
429
422
401
466
145
232
348
349
258
431
141
143
148
137
212
226
108
114
124
168
170
200
198
171
111
224
250
105
121
191
205
209
216
228
368
103
165
179
195
221

_________________________________________________
1 refers to page number in the workbook
2 refers to page number in the Textbook of Dendrology (Harlow et al. 1996, 8th ed.)


EFB 542: Freshwater Wetland Ecosystems
Class Meetings: MWF 9:35 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. in 139 Baker

Wetland
Instructor: Dr. Donald J. Leopold
333 Illick Hall
470-6784 (office)/472-2388 (home)
email: djleopold@esf.edu

Office Hours: MWF 8:15 a.m. to 9:15 a.m. and after class until 11:45 am; or, by appointment.

Course Objectives: (1) Describe the structure and function of freshwater wetlands.
(2) Evaluate ecological principles that broadly apply to all wetland ecosystems, and contrast to terrestrial systems.
(3) Determine effect of management activities on, and the management potential of wetlands.

Scope: The course covers wetland terms and types, wetland hydrology, biogeochemistry, and succession. Basic plant adaptations to wetlands are discussed. Various wetland ecosystems are examined relative to geographical extent, geomorphology, hydrology, chemistry, ecosystem structure, and ecosystem function (succession, productivity, nutrient cycling, etc.). The ecosystems analyzed include: tidal freshwater marshes, inland freshwater marshes, northern peatlands and bogs, southern deepwater swamps, and riparian wetlands. Values, management, and the restoration and creation of wetlands are also discussed.

Methods and Materials: Wetlands, by W.J. Mitsch and J.G. Gosselink (2nd ed., Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., 1993), is the textbook. Additional reading is required for writing assignments. Undergraduate grades are based on written exams (550 points; two regular exams scaled to 150 points each, final scaled to 250 points) and weekly unannounced quizzes (50 points). Undergraduates may choose to write a term paper (substitute for 150 exam points, which will be averaged with scores from two regular exams). Graduate grades are based on written exams (350 points; two regular exams at 100 points each, final worth 150 points), weekly unannounced quizzes (50 points), a term paper (100 points), and oral presentation (100 points). There will be about 10 unannounced quizzes during the semester, which will typically take place during the first five minutes of class. Students who are late or absent for any quiz receive a "0" for that quiz. I will drop the lowest quiz grade for each student before calculating quiz average.

Grades: Grades will be assigned according to the following scale:
TOTAL POINTS % FINAL GRADE
600 - 556
555 - 537
536 - 519
518 - 495
494 - 477
476 - 459
458 - 435
434 - 417
146 - 357
<357
100 - 93
92 - 90
89 - 87
86 - 83
82 - 80
79 - 77
76 - 73
72 - 70
69 - 60
<60
A
A-
B+
B
B-
C+
C
C-
D
F

2003 Schedule:
Jan 13 M Course Mechanics
15 W What is a Wetland? (Chapters 1, 2, and 3)
17 F Why be Concerned? (Chapter 3, 4)
20 M no class (Martin Luther King Day)
22 W Major Wetlands in North America (Chapter 4)
24 F Wetlands Hydrology (Chapter 5)
27 M Chatper 5; term paper topics due
29 W Chatper 5
31 F Wetlands Biogeochemistry (Chapter 6)
Feb 3 M Chapter 6
5 W Chapter 6
7 F Plant Adaptations to the Wetland Environment (Chapter 7)
10 M Chapter 7
12 W term paper abstracts due
14 F Exotic Noxious Species
17 M Wetland Ecosystem Development (Chapter 8)
19 W Chapter 8
21 F Chapter 8
24 M EXAM I (over all material related to Chapters 1 through 8)
____________________________________________________________
26 W Tidal Freshwater Marshes (Chapter 10)
28 F Chapter 10; includes graduate student presentations
Mar 3 M Freshwater Marshes (Chapter 12)
5 W Chapter 12
7 F Chapter 12; includes graduate student presentations
(Spring Recess March 9 to 16)
17 M Peatlands (Chapter 13)
19 W Chapter 13
21 F Chapter 13
24 M Chapter 13; includes graduate student presentations
26 W Southern Pocosins
28 F Freshwater Swamps (Chapter 14)
31 M Chapter 14; includes graduate student presentations; term papers due
Apr 2 W Riparian Wetlands (Chapter 15)
4 F Chapter 15
7 M Chapter 15; includes graduate student presentations
9 W EXAM II (over all material related to Chapters 10, 12, 12, 13, 14, 15)
____________________________________________________________
11 F Values and Valuation of Wetlands (Chapter 16)
14 M Human Impacts and Management of Wetlands (Chapter 17)
16 W Wetland Laws and Protection (Chapter 18)
18 F no class (Easter Break)
21 M Wetland Creation and Restoration (Chapter 19)
23 W Chapter 19
25 F Treatment Wetlands (Chapter 20)
28 M Classification, Inventory, and Delineation of Wetlands (Chapter 21)

FINALS WEEK: Two-hour FINAL EXAM; 50% over material from Exams I and II and 50% over all material related to Chapters 16, 17, 18, 19, 20 and 21, AND wetland diversity paper.

_________________________________________________
Chapter references are in Mitsch and Gosselink (2000); you may be quizzed over readings indicated for that day.

 


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