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Catalog Information Subject to Change

The current ESF Catalog is online only, and is updated as needed throughout the year. To view the version officially associated with a particular year of entry to the College, please refer to the appropriate catalog of record.

ESF Course Descriptions

SRE 225 Physics of Energy (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to the principles of physics and their application in conventional and sustainable energy systems. This course covers the fundamentals of mechanical, chemical, electrical, thermal, and nuclear energy, including efficiency of energy conversions. Fall.
Prerequisite: APM 103 or equivalent and enrollment in the Sustainable Energy Management major, or permission of instructor

SRE 325 Energy Systems (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. The Energy Systems course provides an interdisciplinary overview of human-dominated energy systems. A variety of topics will be covered to introduce students to fossil fuel-based, renewable, and other energy systems, including: energy supply and consumption, extractive approaches, resource demands, environmental impacts and energy security, and quantitative methods related to energy metrics. Students will use systems thinking to evaluate existing and emerging energy systems. The course involves occasional field trips. Fall.
Prerequisites: SRE 225 or equivalent introductory physics course, and FCH 110 and FCH 111 or equivalent one semester of introductory chemistry with lab. Credits will not be granted for SRE 325 and SRE 525 (both undergraduate and graduate versions of the same course).

SRE 335 Renewable Energy (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week providing an overview of the role of renewable energy in the context of energy generation and supply. Sustainable sources of heat, power and fuels will be covered and compared in terms of technological, economic and environmental impacts. Spring
Prerequisites: PHY 211, EFB 200, SRE 225 or equivalent one semester of introductory physics. FCH 110 and FCH 111, or equivalent one semester of introductory chemistry with lab. SRE 325 or instructor permission. Note- Credits will not be granted for SRE 335 and 535 (both undergraduate and graduate versions of the same course)

SRE 337 Energy Resource Assessment (4)
Three hours of lecture per week. One week of field visits to utility-scale energy facilities during the week following the end of finals. Evaluation of energy pathways employed in the Northeast U.S. Primary emphasis on the following topics: the economic, environmental, and technical tradeoffs of utility-scale energy pathway; assessments of the economic viability of utility-scale energy pathways. Spring semester.
Prerequisites: SEM major or permission of instructor; SRE 325

SRE 416 Sustainable Energy Policy (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Evaluation of the sustainable energy field as it relates to policy. Primary emphasis on the following topics: policy concerns that motivated the development and expansion of sustainable energy, a history of the policy interactions between sustainable energy pathways, and controversies that have arisen from these interactions and their effects.
Prerequisites:SRE 325, SRE 335. Corequisite: SRE 422

SRE 419 Energy Policy Assessment Methodologies (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. This course covers the primary methodologies employed to conduct assessments of energy policies and policy proposals, including techno-economic assessment, deterministic analysis, and stochastic analysis. Students will learn how to select the methodology that is most appropriate for an analytical scenario, conduct assessments using the available methodologies, and select the policies or policy proposals that are most effective at achieving a desired energy policy outcome. Spring.
Prerequisites: SRE 335, SRE 416, or FOR333

SRE 422 Energy Markets and Regulation (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion concerning markets and regulation of energy. Topics include: the economics of energy markets, industry restructuring, and thedevelopment of markets for energy efficiency and renewable power. The role and impacts of energy regulation on markets will also be examined. Fall.
Prerequisites: SRE 325 Energy Systems Note: Credits will not be granted for SRE 422 and SRE 622 (both undergraduate and graduate versions of the same course).

SRE 441 Biomass Energy (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Production and use of biomass as a source of renewable energy for the production of bioenergy, biofuels and bioproducts. Characteristics of biomass sources, their conversion to different forms of energy and end products, and an assessments of sustainability. Field trips to regional biomass facilities. Spring
Prerequisites: SRE 325, SRE 335 or consent of instructor

SRE 450 Renewable Energy Capstone Planning (1)
One hour group meeting every two weeks. This course will afford the student an opportunity to select a topic, in conjunction with the instructor, for detail investigation in Capstone II. Each student will work individually with the instructor to arrive at a feasible project. Fall
Prerequisites: SRE 325, SRE 335 Corequisite: SRE 422

SRE 454 Renewable Energy Finance and Analysis (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week concerning renewable energy finance and analysis. Topics include: the adoption and financing of renewable energy project within the context of overall economics of energy markets, financial analysis of renewable energy projects, the role of tax and subsidies in promoting the adoption of renewable sources of energy. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): FOR205 Principles of Accounting (or equivalent) and FOR333 Natural Resources Managerial Economics (or equivalent) or permission of the instructor

SRE 479 Life Cycle Assessment (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a tool used across fields to determine the cradle-to-grave environmental impacts of products and systems. The course will cover how to perform an LCA and how to evaluate LCA results. Students will conduct in groups a full life cycle assessment with a literature review, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty analysis using available data and impact assessment methods. Spring.
Prerequisites:A college-level statistics course, junior or senior standing, or instructorpermission

SRE 491 Sustainable Energy Management Capstone (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. This capstone course emphasizes the assimilation, integration, and interpretation of the physical and socioeconomic sciences. It provides students with the opportunity to integrate skills and knowledge accumulated from professional and supporting coursework. A written comprehensive energy resource plan, also presented orally, provides the central vehicle by which students demonstrate their abilities as future energy resource managers. Spring.
Prerequisites: SRE 325, SRE 335, SRE 422, and FOR 333, or Permission of Instructor

SRE 525 Energy Systems (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. The Energy Systems course provides an interdisciplinary overview of human-dominated energy systems. A variety of topics will be covered to introduce students to fossil fuel-based, renewable, and other energy systems, including: energy supply and consumption, extractive approaches, resource demands, environmental impacts and energy security, and quantitative methods related to energy metrics. Students will use systems thinking to evaluate existing and emerging energy systems. The course involves occasional field trips. Students taking SRE 525 will be required to complete additional work and held to higher expectations than those taking SRE 325. Fall.
Prerequisites: Undergraduate courses in introductory physics and introductory chemistry. Note:Credits will not be granted for SRE 325 and SRE 525 (both undergraduate and graduate versions of the same course).

SRE 535 Renewable Energy (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week providing an overview of the role of renewable energy in the context of energy generation and supply. Sustainable sources of heat, power and fuels will be covered and compared in terms of technological, economic and environmental impacts. Students taking SRE 535 will be required to complete additional work and held to higher standards than those taking SRE 335. Spring
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or instructor permission. Note: Credits will not be granted for SRE 335 and 535 (both undergraduate and graduate versions of the same course)

SRE 537 Energy Resource Assessment (4)
Three hours of lecture per week. One week of field visits to utility-scale energy facilities during the week following the end of finals. Evaluation of energy pathways employed in the Northeast U.S. Primary emphasis on quantification and comparison of the economic, environmental, and technical tradeoffs of utility-scale energy pathways. Critical analysis and assessment of the economic viability of utility-scale energy pathways. Spring semester.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both SRE 337 and SRE 537. Prerequisite: Graduate standing of instructor permission.

SRE 619 Energy Policy Assessment Methodologies (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. This course covers the primary methodologies employed to conduct assessments of energy policies and policy proposals, including techno-economic assessment, deterministic analysis, and stochastic analysis. Students will learn how to select the methodology that is most appropriate for an analytical scenario, conduct assessments using the available methodologies, and select the policies or policy proposals that are most effective at achieving a desired energy policy outcome. Graduate students will be expected to further compare and contrast the different methodologies available, identify the appropriate methodology for a policy question and justify its use, and quantify the effectiveness of the solution to the policy question in a separate term paper. Spring
Prerequisite: Graduate standing

SRE 622 Energy Markets and Regulation (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion concerning markets and regulation of energy. Topics include: the economics of energy markets, industry restructuring, and the development of markets for energy efficiency and renewable power. The role and impacts of energy regulation on markets will also be examined. Fall.
Prerequisites: SRE 325 Energy Systems or equivalent or permission of instructor Note: Credits will not be granted for SRE 422 and SRE 622 (both undergraduate and graduate versions of the same course).

SRE 641 Biomass Energy (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Production and use of biomass as a source of renewable energy for the production of bioenergy, biofuels and bioproducts. Characteristics of biomass sources, their conversion to different forms of energy and end products, and an assessment of source sustainability. Field trips to regional biomass facilities. Spring
Note: Credit will not be granted for SRE 441 and SRE 641 (both undergraduate and graduate versions of the same course)

SRE 679 Life Cycle Assessment (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a tool used across fields to determine the cradle-to-grave environmental impacts of products and systems. The course will cover how to mathematically define the life cycles of products and systems, perform an LCA, and interpret LCA results and evaluate them within the context of the scientific literature. Students will individually conduct a full life cycle assessment with a literature review, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty analysis using available data and impact assessment methods. Spring.
Prerequisites: A college-based statistics course or instructor permission.

Course Numbering System

100-499: Undergraduate courses for which no graduate credit may be given.

500-599: Graduate courses designed expressly for areas of specialization in post-baccalaureate programs. Qualified undergraduate students may enroll by permission of the instructor.

600-699: Graduate courses designed expressly for advanced levels of specialization. Undergraduate students with a cumulative grade point average of 3.000 or better may enroll in these courses with an approved petition.

700-999: Advanced graduate level courses for which no undergraduate students may register. Shared resources courses, designated as 400/500 or 400/600, are designed when the topic coverage of both courses is the same. Separate course syllabuses are developed expressly differentiating the requirements and evaluative criteria between the undergraduate course and the graduate course. No type of cross-listing may be offered unless approved by the ESF faculty.