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Applied Ecology

M.P.S.

applied ecology

This area of study in the M.P.S. degree is designed for students who desire to solidify their background in applied ecology and professionals who would return for “retooling”; suitable for careers in environmental oversight, policy, planning, law, and education.

This program begins with a three-day orientation in August at one or more of the ESF field facilities. Coursework requirements include three credit hours each from five of the seven focus areas: GIS tools, Statistical Tools, Specialty Tools, Ecosystem Ecology, Organismal Ecology, Human Dimensions in Ecology, and Communications in Ecology; two credit hours in graduate seminars (EFB 797) and additional 19 credit hours of graduate coursework for a total of 36 credit hours.

Rationale

There is a need for individuals to have graduate training in the area of applied ecology, but many such individuals do not require the major research and thesis requirement of a traditional M.S. degree. These prospective MPS students include individuals who will work for environmental groups and consulting firms as well as municipalities and state and federal agencies. This option will also be particularly useful for secondary school teachers seeking permanent certification in New York State and students who have a major orientation in environmental policy, planning or law but wish to solidify their background in applied ecology. This MPS option will be distinctly beneficial to professionals returning for "retooling." The MPS option in Applied Ecology differs substantially from the M.S. degree in EFB with respect to the type of students, requirements and overall educational goals.

Requirements

Incoming students will be introduced to the Applied Ecology Option and key topics in the field of applied ecology at a three-day orientation in August before beginning the Fall semester at one of the ESF field facilities (e.g., Cranberry Lake Biological Station, Thousand Island Biological Station, and Adirondack Ecological Center at the Huntington Wildlife Forest) with access to nearby aquatic and terrestrial sites including both natural and anthropogenically impacted systems.

Coursework requirements include a total of 15 credit hours selected in 5 of the 7 focus areas listed below, 2 credit hours of graduate seminars and additional 19 credit hours in graduate courses for a minimum of 36 credit hours.

Catalog Statement

Applied Ecology Option: Designed for students who desire to solidify their background in applied ecology and professionals who would return for “retooling”; suitable for careers in environmental oversight, policy, planning, law, and education. This program begins with a 3-day orientation in August at one of the ESF field facilities. Coursework requirements include 3 credit hours each from 5 of the 7 focus areas, 2 credit hours in graduate seminars (EFB 797) and additional 19 credit hours of graduate coursework for a total of 36 credit hours.

Current List of Courses in 7 Focus Areas

One course each from 5 of the 7 areas for a total of 15 graduate credit hours (each course carries 3 credit hours except as noted)

(1) GIS tools (3 hours)

  • EFB 519 GEOGRAPHIC MODELING
  • ERE 550 INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
  • FOR 557 PRACTICAL VECTOR GIS
  • FOR 558 ADVANCED TOPICS IN GIS

(2) Statistical tools (3 hours)

  • APM 510 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS
  • APM 620 ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE
  • APM 625 INTRO/SAMPLING TECHNIQUES
  • APM 630 REGRESSION ANALYSIS
  • APM 635 MULTIVARIATE STAT METHOD
  • APM 645 NONPARAMETRIC STATS&CAT DATA ANALYSES

(3) Specialty Tools (3 hours)

  • APM 500 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
  • APM 653 SIMULATION DESIGN AND ANALYSIS
  • EFB 601 MOLECULAR BIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES
  • ERE 552 FUNDAMENTALS OF REMOTE SENSING
  • ERE 566 GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEMS I
  • ERE 645 HYDROLOGIC MODELING
  • FCH 515 METHODS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS
  • FOR 546 FOREST SOIL GENESIS, CLASSIFICATION, AND MAPPING
  • FOR 635 FOREST SOILS AND THEIR ANALYSES
  • FOR 645 HYDROLOGICAL TECHNIQUES
  • EFB 625 PLANT BIOTECHNOLOGY
  • EFB 733 TECHNIQUES IN PLANT PHYSIOLOGY

(4) Ecosystem Ecology (3 hours)

  • EFB 516 ECOSYSTEMS
  • EFB 518 SYSTEMS ECOLOGY (4)
  • EFB 523 TROPICAL ECOLOGY
  • EFB 524 LIMNOLOGY
  • EFB 610 ECOLOGICAL BIOGEOCHEM
  • EFB 623 MARINE ECOLOGY (5)
  • EFB 644 BIOGEOGRAPHY (4)

(5) Organismal Ecology (3 hours)

  • EFB 505 MICROBIAL ECOLOGY
  • EFB 535 SYSTEMATIC BOTANY
  • EFB 542 FRESHWATER WETLAND ECOSYSTEMS
  • EFB 554 AQUATIC ENTOMOLOGY
  • EFB 628 MYCORRHIZAL ECOLOGY
  • EFB 640 MYCOLOGY
  • EFB 645 PLANT ECOLOGY
  • EFB 646 ECOLOGY OF MOSSES
  • EFB 662 ANIMAL PHYSIOL:ENVRN&ECOL
  • EFB 693 WILDLIFE HABITATS AND POPULATIONS (4)

(6) Human Dimensions in Ecology (3 hours)

  • APM 650 OPERATIONS RESEARCH
  • EFB 502 ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF INVASIVE SPECIES
  • EFB 513 ADIRONDACK FOREST ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (2 – 3)
  • EFB 551 FOREST INSECT ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT
  • EFB 600 Toxic Health Hazards (4)
  • EFB 611 Topics in Environmental Toxicology
  • EFB 687 FISHERIES SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT
  • EFB 692 ECOL AND MGT OF WATERFOWL
  • EFB 693 WILDLIFE HABITATS AND POPULATIONS (4)
  • ERE 506 HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT
  • ERE 691 AIR POLLUTION ENGINEERING
  • FOR 533 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL PROFESSIONALS
  • FOR 560 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT
  • FOR 630 AGROFORESTRY
  • FOR 665 NATURAL RESOURCES POLICY
  • FOR 670 RESOURCE AND ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
  • FOR 673 PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF OUTDOOR RECREATION AREAS
  • FOR 678 WILDERNESS AND WILDLANDS MANAGEMENT
  • FOR 687 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW AND POLICY
  • FOR 688 NATURAL RESOURCES ADMINISTRATION LAW
  • FOR 753 ADVANCED NATURAL RESOURCE AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

(7) Communications in Ecology (3 hours)

  • EFB 616 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL INTERPRETATION
  • EFB 617 INTERPRETIVE DESIGN

Participating Faculty

  • Martin Dovciak; mdovciak@esf.edu
    Plant Ecology, Forest Ecosystems, Biodiversity, Global Change, Ecosystem Management & Restoration
  • Shannon Farrell; sfarrell@esf.edu
    Wildlife ecology, wildlife-habitat relationships, management planning for endangered and threatened species, human impacts on wildlife, ecosystem services, endangered species act policy innovations, birds, bats
  • John M. Farrell; jmfarrell@esf.edu
    aquatic ecology, fisheries science & management, freshwater coastal wetlands, St. Lawrence River studies & Great Lakes, invasive species, restoration
  • Melissa K. Fierke; mkfierke@esf.edu
    forest entomology, forest ecology, invasive forest pests, insect-tree interactions, tree defenses
  • Jacqueline Frair; jfrair@esf.edu
    wildlife ecology and management, ecology of large herbivores and predators, animal movements, resource selection, population demography, quantitative methods in conservation, landscape ecology
  • James Gibbs; jpgibbs@esf.edu
    herpetology, vertebrate conservation biology, genetics and ecology in birds, reptiles and amphibians, songbirds, giant tortoise, statistics, wildlife population monitoring, galapagos islands, conservation biology, ecological monitoring, population genetics, applied demography, undergraduate conservation education
  • Hyatt Green; hgreen@esf.edu
    Molecular Microbial Ecology, Microbial Water Quality, Microbial Biogeography, Host-Microbe Co-evolution, Fermentation Microbiology
  • Thomas R. Horton; trhorton@esf.edu
    mycorrhizal plant ecology, molecular ecology, ecology, fungal communities, mycology, fire ecology
  • Robin W. Kimmerer; rkimmer@esf.edu
    plant restoration ecology, bryology, bryoecology, restoration ecology, ethnobotany, conservation biology and bryophyte ecology, traditional ecological knowledge
  • Donald J. Leopold; djleopold@esf.edu
    forest and freshwater wetland ecology, conservation, and restoration, peatland ecology and conservation, local and regional controls of species richness and rarity, dynamics of plant communities as affected by man and environment, management for unique communities and rare species, dendrology, native plants, restoration ecology, rare species conservation
  • Karin E. Limburg; klimburg@esf.edu
    riverine fish and estuarine ecology, fisheries ecology, watershed ecology, systems ecology, ecological economics, fisheries and ecosystem science, coupled human-natural systems, biogeochemistry, fisheries ecology, ecosystem ecology, biogeochemical tracers, modeling
  • Mark V. Lomolino; island@esf.edu
    conservation biology, wildlife, ecology, evolution and biogeography
  • Gregory McGee; ggmcgee@esf.edu
    ecology, management and restoration of forest ecosystems; STEM education
  • Stacy A. McNulty; smcnulty@esf.edu
    forest ecology, phenology, vertebrate ecology. exploration of long-term changes, biodiversity conservation, and relationship of human land use planning, recreation, and forest management to ecosystem function in the northern forest.
  • Myron J. Mitchell; mitchell@syr.edu
    biogeochemistry, environmental energetics
  • Dylan Parry; dparry@esf.edu
    Biological invasion, climate change, and conservation, primarily in the context of insects in forested ecosystems.
  • Neil H. Ringler; nhringle@esf.edu
    fish ecology and behavior, foraging behavior of fishes, salmon reproduction, vertebrate anatomy, aquatic insect ecology, stream ecology and management, aquatic and fisheries restoration, aquatic entomology
  • Kimberly L. Schulz; kschulz@syr.edu
    nutrient and exotic species effects on aquatic ecosystems, ecological stoichiometry, aquatic community and ecosystem ecology, bioenergetics, nutrient cycling, lower food web studies, great lakes, finger lakes, plankton, limnology, aquatic ecology, biogeochemistry, invasive species
  • William M. Shields; wms1@syr.edu
    animal behavior, evolution and genetics, evolution of animal communication and dispersal systems, effects of genetic constraints on the evolution of social behavior, sociobiology and behavioral ecology, the use of DNA in identity testing and conservation biology, the interface between science and the law, conservation theory, behavior in birds and mammals, forensic DNA analysis
  • Donald Stewart; djstewart@esf.edu
    ecology and systematics, lake systems ecology, aquatic ecology, fish conservation, ecology and population biology in tropical and temperate systems, fish ecology and fisheries management, ecological energetics, modeling predation and production processes, Great Lakes ecosystems, Amazonian ecosystems, ecology and systematics of neotropical freshwater fishes
  • J. Scott Turner; jsturner@syr.edu
    animal physiology, physiological ecology, thermal energetics, biology of body size, physiology of gas exchange
  • Alexander Weir; aweir@esf.edu
    conservation mycology, fungal biodiversity and conservation, fungal-arthropod interactions, biology of parasites and symbionts, systematics and evolutionary biology of fungi, fungi and humans, biology of parasites and symbionts

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