Douglas J. Daley, P.E.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Department of Environmental Resources Engineering

 
 

Associate Professor
and
Director,
SUNY Center for Brownfield Studies
 
Office: 420 Baker Lab
Mail: 402 Baker Lab
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
1 Forestry Drive, Syracuse, NY 13210
djdaley<at>esf.edu
(315) 470-4760 (Office)
(315) 470-6633 (Dept)
(315) 470-6958 (Fax)

 
 

Teaching

ERE 430

Engineering Decision Analysis (Spring)

ERE 468

Solid and Hazardous Waste Management (Fall)

ERE 488 Engineering Project Management

ERE 489

Engineering Planning and Design (Spring)

ERE 545 Environmental Soil Physics (Fall)

Currently enrolled students can find course materials at Syracuse University Blackboard blackboard.syr.edu

Note to graduate and non-engineering students: if you are interested in enrolling in one of these classes, please consult me. I often offer alternative course registration opportunities through Special Topics courses.

Independent Research Opportunities for Undergraduate students exist in green infrastructure, waste management, ecosystem restoration and related topics.

 

 

 

 

ERE 489

ERE students, faculty and alumni continued their collaborations through the capstone design course (fondly known as P&D) to improve the quality of life in Central New York. The 2016-17 P&D course, led by Associate Professor Douglas Daley (’82), once again engaged 29 senior ERE students with projects of local interest. This year’s projects, representing the breadth, depth and abilities of the ERE students, included: Feasibility Analysis of Using Anaerobic Digestion for Food Waste Management (Madison County Department of Solid Waste); Feasibility Analysis of Gasifier Technology for Non-Recyclable Agricultural Plastics, Scrap Tires and Organic Waste (Madison County Department of Solid Waste); Design and Optimization of Water Quality Sensors and Wireless Communication for Citizen Science (Nine Mile Creek Watershed Conservation Council); Design of Ecological and Recreation Enhancements for the Butternut Feeder Canal (Town of Dewitt); Feasibility Analysis to Improve Dewatering of Phosphate Mine Tailings, Florida (Nalco); Planning and Design for Ecological, Recreational and Economic Improvements to the Old Erie Canal (Madison County Planning Department); and Assessment and Preliminary Design of Primary Clarifier Improvements at Metro WWTP (Onondaga County Department of Water Environment Protection). According to project sponsors, the student-led design efforts will be incorporated into the next stages of development and implementation at the project sites. The students contributed over 3,000 hours of service learning to their project sponsors, and received invaluable experience with lab and field methods, modeling, prototyping, and design to prepare themselves to enter the engineering profession.

ERE 545 students learn field methods (Guelph permeameter)

ERE 468 students visit local solid waste management facilities, such as the Madison County landfill.