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Course Numbering System

100-499: Undergraduate courses for which no graduate credit may be given.

500-599: Graduate courses designed expressly for areas of specialization in post-baccalaureate programs. Qualified undergraduate students may enroll by permission of the instructor.

600-699: Graduate courses designed expressly for advanced levels of specialization. Undergraduate students with a cumulative grade point average of 3.000 or better may enroll in these courses with an approved petition.

700-999: Advanced graduate level courses for which no undergraduate students may register. Shared resources courses, designated as 400/500 or 400/600, are designed when the topic coverage of both courses is the same. Separate course syllabuses are developed expressly differentiating the requirements and evaluative criteria between the undergraduate course and the graduate course. No type of cross-listing may be offered unless approved by the ESF faculty.

FNRM Courses

CME

CME 132 Orientation Seminar: Sustainable Construction Management and Engineering (1)
One hour of lecture and discussion per week. Introduction to campus resources available to ensure academic success in the area of Sustainable Construction Management and Engineering. Fall.

CME 151 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Financial accounting concepts that aid entrepreneurs, managers, investors, and creditors in planning, operating, and analyzing a business. Emphasis is on interpretation of financial statements. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): none.

CME 202 Introduction to Professional Communications (1)
Three hours of lab per week. Introduction to intermediate-level use and understanding of software for word processing, spreadsheet analysis, and database management. Focused on developing the ability to prepare reports including preparation of documents, data analysis, and written presentations. Fall.
Pre- or co-requisite(s): none.

CME 215 Sustainable Construction (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Overview of sustainable design and construction concepts and practices. The emergence of green building, issues, and rating systems. Sources of chemicals in buildings, indoor air quality, and human comfort. Basic energy principles and energy-efficient technologies. Selection of materials. Role of the contractor in the management and construction of green projects. Spring.

CME 226 Statics and Mechanics of Materials (4)
Four hours of lecture/discussion per week. Equilibrium systems of forces in two and three dimensions. Analysis of structural components for stresses and deformations. Stability and design of beams and columns made of common engineering materials. Design methods and safety considerations. Spring and Fall.
Prerequisite: Calculus I, Physics I.

CME 252 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introduction to the role of accounting information systems in measuring performance, influencing employee behavior, and facilitating planning decisions such as what products and services to offer, in which markets, and at what prices. Spring
Prerequisite(s): CME 151.

CME 255 Plan Interpretation and Quantity Takeoff (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introductory course in construction plan interpretation and quantity takeoff. Will address how to read and interpret construction plans and introduce basic quantity takeoff skills. Fall.

CME 303 Sustainable Construction Management and Engineering Internship (1 - 3)
Full or part-time employment with an organization that involves the student in an educational experience in a professional establishment. A resident faculty member must serve as the student’s academic sponsor. A study plan that describes the internship’s educational goals must be submitted prior to its commencement. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite: Upper-division status.

CME 304 Environmental Performance Measures for Buildings (3)
An overview of how building rating systems for green construction have developed, their present application, and future directions for growth. The course will explore the process for development of individual standards, the different building certification systems that have been developed using these standards, and long-term development and code adoption of such certification systems.

CME 305 Sustainable Energy Systems for Buildings (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Exploration of construction management-related issues in creating a more sustainable energy use in our building stock. Integrating sustainable energy sources in construction as well as issues related to using energy more efficiently. Fall.

CME 306 Engineering Materials for Sustainable Construction (3)
Two hours of lecture/discussion per week and one lab per week. Introduction to the principal structural materials used for building construction and their engineering properties and environmental impacts. The production and performance of these materials will be explored through class discussion and laboratory experiments. The application of each of the materials during sustainable construction processes will be emphasized. Spring.

CME 322 Mechanical Processing (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Primary log reduction methods and industry practices. Lumber grading. Wood cutting principles. Machining practice in secondary wood-using industries. Experience in the operation of certain primary and secondary machining equipment. Fall.

CME 326 Fluid Treatment of Wood (3)
Two hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Basic wood-moisture relationships, wood shrinkage and swelling, permeability, thermal conductivity, wood drying and preservation treatments, and fire retardancy. Flow of fluids, heat and water vapor are treated as analogous phenomena related to the cellular structure of wood. Laboratory studies in relative humidity measurement, wood-moisture relations, relationships between wood permeability and drying and treatability, industrial wood drying, dry kiln operation and preservation treatments, and fire retardancy. Spring.
Prerequisite: CME 387 or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 326 and CME 682.

CME 327 Site Investigations and Solutions (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Principles of geotechnical engineering, site investigation methods, methods for improving sites, and the role of geotechnical engineering in construction contracts. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): none

CME 330 Building Code of New York State (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introduction to the Building Code that legally governs the design and construction of all building types within New York State. The course includes a basic understanding of the Code including history and origin, legal enforcement, basic definitions, and terminologies. Fall.

CME 331 Construction Safety (3)
Occupational Safety and Health Practices in the construction industry with coverage of the U. S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Regulations (CFR 1910 and 1926 Standards). Detailed study of Construction Safety and Hazardous Communications programs, personal protective equipment, tools, electrical power, ladders, and scaffolding, floor and wall openings, cranes and power equipment. Special problems related to concrete work, erection and demolition. OSHA 30 Hr. card earned. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 331 and CME 531.

CME 332 Mechanical and Electrical Equipment (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. The course introduces the basic concepts of mechanical systems design and construction for residential and commercial buildings. Simplified design and construction estimates are performed for heating, cooling, plumbing, sanitation, electrical, and lighting systems. Relevant code requirements are stressed. Fall.

CME 335 Cost Engineering (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Statistics, cost of money, rates of return, cash flow, budget development, cost tracking, productivity and progress, constructability and value engineering, change control and risk analysis. Fall.
Prerequisite: Upper division standing or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 335 and CME 535.

CME 342 Light Construction (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. An introduction to the construction process with an emphasis on the unique aspects of light construction. Introduces construction management principles related to material properties, building science, structural design, estimating, and scheduling. Fall.

CME 343 Construction Estimating (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Basic estimating/bidding theory and process. The processes for reviewing and interpreting contracts, specifications and blueprints and their role in the estimating/bidding process. How to perform a quantity takeoff, be able to create a final estimate/bid including the appropriate General Conditions and Markups. Several projects based upon the concepts are assigned on the material listed above as well as utilizing either a spreadsheet or Timberline Precision Computer Estimating. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): CME 255 Plan Interpretation and QTO or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 343 and CME 543.

CME 350 Construction Methods and Equipment (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. The study of production, methods of operation and costs of heavy construction equipment. Analysis of heavy construction operations. Economics of equipment use. The fundamentals of decision making involved in the selection of methods and equipment that will result in the most effective and efficient performance on a project. Spring.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 350 and CME 525.

CME 376 Decay of Wood Products (3)
Three hours of lecture/laboratory/demonstration per week. Degradation of wood by fungi and other biological agents. Emphasis on the effects of decay on wood properties, methods of decay detection in wood products and decay prevention. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): CME 386 or CME 387.

CME 387 Renewable Materials for Sustainable Construction (3)
Three hours of discussion, lecture and demonstration per week. Properties and uses of major structural construction materials. Identification and knowledge of the major wood species and their applications in construction. Fall.

CME 388 Wood and Fiber Identification Laboratory (2)
Six hours of laboratory per week. Wood and papermaking fiber identification using both gross and microscopic features. Fall.
Prerequisite: CME 387 to be taken concurrently or previously.

CME 389 Wood Identification Laboratory (1)
Three hours of laboratory per week. Identification of principal commercial timbers of United States on gross characteristics. Spring.
Prerequisite: CME 387.

CME 390 Fiber Identification Laboratory (1)
Three hours of laboratory per week. Identification of woody and nonwoody papermaking fibers. Spring.
Prerequisite: CME 387.

CME 400 Introduction to Forest Products (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Characteristics of the products of the forest tree and manufacture of wood products. Spring.

CME 404 Applied Structures (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion/demonstration per week. Applications of statics/mechanics to common engineering structures. Analysis and design of wood, concrete and steel systems considering sustainability and life-cycle analysis. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): CME 226, Statics and Mechanics of Materials.

CME 405 Building Information Modeling for Construction Management (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. An introduction to the basic concepts of building information modeling as a construction approach, and an exploration of its application to construction management. Emphasis on the use of building information modeling for estimation, scheduling, clash detection, and project communication. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): CME 255 Plan Interpretation and Quantity Takeoff. Co-requisite: CME 343 Construction Estimating.

CME 410 Computer-Aided Design and Drafting (3)
One-half hour lecture, two-and-one-half hours lab, and a minimum of six hours additional lab is required. This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of computer-aided design and drafting. It covers the commands needed to create a two-dimensional drawing, with particular emphasis on techniques used in the design profession applications. The requirements for the course include completing self-tutorials, creating drawings, and the completion of two major projects. Spring.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 410 and CME 610.

CME 422 Composite Materials for Sustainable Construction (3)
Two hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Properties, manufacture and design of multiphase materials. Applications and testing for service in sustainable construction systems and life-cycle analysis. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): CME 226, Statics and Mechanics of Materials and CME 387, Renewable Materials for Sustainable Construction.

CME 444 Materials Marketing (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Fundamentals of marketing forest products, building and construction industry materials, including products, markets, distribution, segmentation, pricing, promotion and sales. Specific focus is on the unique nature and issues of forest products and building materials; vertical and horizontal integration, distribution channels, market segmentation and product positioning strategies. Fall.
Prerequisite: FOR 207 Introduction to Economics or equivalent.

CME 453 Construction Planning and Scheduling (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. The use of common types of schedules: Gantt, Activity on Node, Precedence Diagram, PERT and Linear. Identification of activities and performance duration analyses of these activities. Updating of schedules, resource planning and assignment, cost planning and scheduling are all covered. Schedule development is performed both manually and with industry-accepted software. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): CME 343 or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 453 and CME 653.

CME 454 Construction Project Management (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion and three hours of laboratory per week. How to define and properly identify company organizational structures and project delivery systems. Integration of estimating, bidding, scheduling and cost control into the management process. Safety, quality control, value engineering, procurement, labor relations and insurance and bonding requirements as integral parts of a construction project. Projects based upon Expedition project management software. Spring.
Prerequisites:CME 343, CME 453, senior standing or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 454 and CME 654.

CME 455 Construction Contracts and Specifications (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. The types of contracts used in the construction industry. Analysis of the contractor, designer and owner duties and obligations as determined by the construction contract documents. Study of concepts, language, formats and procedures for project manual organization practice and the general conditions of the contract for construction. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): Upper division standing or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 455 and CME 658.

CME 480 Fundamentals of Microscopy (3)
Three hours of lecture/demonstration per week. Introduction to light microscopy, electron microscopy, atomic force, confocal, Raman, Near Field Optical, Correlative and other microscopic methods and their newest applications. Light microscopic techniques include brightfield, phase contrast, polarized light, Nomarski, Kohler illumination. Imaging and recording methods. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 480 and CME 680.

CME 487 Wood Chemistry and Physics (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Wood chemistry and physical properties described in relation to the practical function of wood products. The methodologies used to explore these relationships; including microscopy, mechanical testing, and chemical analysis and their interpretation. Fall.
Prerequisite: CME 387.

CME 488 Professional Construction Project Management Presentation Seminar (2)
Two hours of lecture/seminar/preparation per week. A preparatory course for participation in a professional construction management proposal process including proposal development and professional presentation of the proposal. The course culminates in participation at a regional construction management competition sponsored by the Associated Schools of Construction Region 1. Fall.
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and permission of the instructor.

CME 495 Undergraduate Experience in College Teaching (1 - 3)
Undergraduate students gain experience as teaching assistants. They assist the instructor with the teaching and learning experience, assist students with learning course concepts, and mentor students on how to succeed in an undergraduate course. Responsibilities vary by section and instructor. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. The student must have previously completed, with grade of B or better, the course in which they will assist.

CME 497 Senior Ethics Seminar (1)
One hour of lecture/discussion per week. Student papers/ presentations are directed toward professional issues in ethics and career preparation, Fall.
Prerequisite(s): Senior status in SCME.

CME 498 Research or Design Problem (1 - 3)
Conferences, library, laboratory and/or field research on a specific problem in wood products engineering. Written report required. Fall, Spring and Summer.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and advisor.

CME 504 Environmental Performance Measures for Building (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Environmental Performance Measures for Buildings - Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Overview of building rating systems for green construction, their development, present application, and future directions for growth. Explores the process for development of individual standards, different building certification systems that have been developed using these standards, and long-term development and code adoption of such certification systems. An experiment-based, analytical, or evaluative project is required. Fall
Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing, or upper‐division standing with approval of instructor. Note: Credit will not be given for both CME 304 and CME 504.

CME 505 Sustainable Energy Systems for Buildings (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Exploration of construction management-related issues in creating a more sustainable energy use in our building stock. Integrating sustainable energy sources in construction as well as issues related to using energy more efficiently. An experiment-based, analytical, or evaluative project is required. Fall
Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing, or upper‐division standing with approval of instructor. Note: Credit will not be given for both CME 305 and CME 505.

CME 525 Construction Methods and Equipment (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Analysis of heavy construction operations and related environmental concerns. Production calculations, means and methods selection and operating costs of heavy construction equipment are addressed. The economics of equipment use are analyzed. The use of a digitizer in earthwork quantity takeoff is explored. The outcome of the course is to select the most cost efficient and performance efficient method and equipment. A term paper is required. Spring.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 525 and CME 350.

CME 531 Construction Safety (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Occupational Safety and Health practices in the construction industry. An overview of the US Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Regulations, 29 CFR 1910 and 29 CFR 1926. Comprehensive review of: general safety and health requirements, hazard communication, confined space entry, lockout/tagout programs, workplace violence, personal protective equipment, fire protection, signs and barricades, rigging, small tools – hand and power, welding and cutting, electrical, fall protection, scaffolding, cranes, mobile equipment, excavation and trenching, steel erection, stairways and ladders and permissible exposure limits. A term paper is required. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 531 and CME 331.

CME 532 Mechanical and Electrical Equipment (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. The course introduces the basic concepts of mechanical systems design and construction for residential and commercial buildings. Simplified design and construction estimates are performed for heating, cooling, plumbing, sanitation, electrical, and lighting systems. Relevant code requirements are stressed. An experiment-based project is required. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be given for both CME 332 and CME 532.

CME 535 Cost Engineering (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Statistics, cost of money, rates of return, cash flow, budget development, cost tracking, productivity and progress, constructability and value engineering, change control and risk analysis.
Prerequisite: Upper division standing or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 535 and CME 335.

CME 543 Construction Estimating (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Definition and explanation of estimating/bidding theory and process. The processes for reviewing and interpreting contracts, specifications and blueprints as well as their role in the estimating/bidding process. Perform a quantity takeoff. Create a final estimate/bid, including the appropriate General Conditions and Markups. Several projects based on the concepts listed above as well as utilizing either a spreadsheet or Timberline Precision Estimating. A term paper describing how the relevant topics of the course fit a specific industry application, and production of an additional project based on Timberline Precision estimating software or equivalent are required. Spring.
Prerequisites: CME 255 Plan Interpretation and QTO or basic estimating experience and permission of the instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 543 and CME 343.

CME 565 Sustainable Innovations in Residential Construction (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Principles of sustainable residential construction; the adaptation of biological, ecological, and cultural elements into building performance standards, practical building specifications, standards and systems. Spring.

CME 580 Microtechnique of Wood (3)
Three hours of laboratory per week. Instruction on the use of the sliding microtome to slice thin sections of wood for light microscopy and for sample surface preparation of wood for scanning electron microscopy. Care of the microtome blade, staining of wood sections and preparation of microscope slides. Fall or Spring.
Pre- or co-requisite: permission of instructor.

CME 585 Light Microscopy for Research Applications (3)
Two hours of lecture/three hours of laboratory per week. Principles of light microscopy and photomicrographic digital imagery using Spot camera and Image Pro 7.0 software. Extensive laboratory component. Spring.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CME 587 Renewable Materials for Sustainable Construction (3)
Three hours of discussion, lecture and demonstration per week. Properties and uses of wood and other renewable materials as a major construction materials. Identification and knowledge of the major wood species and their applications in construction. Evaluation of current practices and materials. Fall.

CME 605 Building Information Modeling for Construction Management (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introduction to the basic concepts of building information modeling as a construction approach, and exploration of its application to construction management. Emphasis on building information modeling for estimating, scheduling, clash detection, and project communication. An experiment‐based, analytical, or evaluative project is required. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing Co-requisite: CME 543 Note: Credit will not be given for both CME 405 and CME 605.

CME 610 Computer-Aided Design and Drafting (3)
One-half hour lecture, two-and-one-half hours lab, and a minimum of six hours additional lab is required. This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of computer-aided design and drafting. It covers the commands needed to create a two-dimensional drawing, with particular emphasis on techniques used in the design profession applications. The requirements for the course include completing self-tutorials, creating drawings, and the completion of two major projects at an advanced level. Spring.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 410 and CME 610.

CME 622 Composite Materials for Sustainable Construction (3)
Two hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Properties, manufacture and design of multiphase materials. Applications and testing for service in sustainable construction systems and life-cycle analysis. Evaluation of current practices and materials. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): CME 226, Statics and Mechanics of Materials, and CME 387 or CME 587, Renewable Materials for Sustainable Construction

CME 643 Estimating for Construction in a Green Global Economy (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Building upon the estimating skills developed through undergraduate coursework and professional experience this course will look at how to address global estimating concerns such as monetary value between various currencies, how the purchase of commodities futures effects material pricing, the linkages between financial, real estate development and policies and their effects on the construction markets. How to price multi-year projects addressing the previous issues and how to construct an estimate that will convey the information relative to green construction costs to the client in a proper manner will also be addressed. Fall or Spring.
Prerequisites: CME 543 or equivalent or 3 to 5 years of professional estimating experience and permission of instructor.

CME 653 Construction Planning and Scheduling (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. The use of Gantt, Activity on Node, Precedence Diagram, PERT and Linear schedules. Identification of activities and duration analyses of these activities. Update schedules, plan and assign resources, plan cost and schedule. Schedule development is performed both manually and with industry accepted software. A term paper describing how the relevant topics of the course fit a specific industry application and an additional project utilizing the software are required. Fall.
Prerequisites: Estimating experience and/or equivalent scheduling experience. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 653 and CME 453.

CME 654 Construction Project Management (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. How to define and properly identify company organizational structures. Project delivery systems, integration of estimating, bidding, scheduling and cost control into the management process. How safety, quality control, value engineering, procurement, labor relations and insurance and bonding requirements are integral parts of a construction project. A term paper describing how the relevant topics of the course fit a specific industry application is required. Spring.
Prerequisite(s):CME 543, CME 653, or equivalent experience and permission of the instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 654 and CME 454.

CME 658 Construction Contracts and Specifications (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. The types of construction contracts used in the construction industry from the Owner, Contractor, Subcontractor and Supplier viewpoints. Types of required insurance and the remedies available to contractors are presented. The process of bidding and negotiating from the legal perspective is covered along with contract administration. Specifications are introduced by type and the requirements of each type are discussed, based on current industry-accepted standards. A term paper describing how the relevant topics of the course fit a specific industry application is required. Spring.
Prerequisite: Upper division standing or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 658 and CME 455.

CME 663 Managing a Construction Project through Construction Planning and Scheduling (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Building upon planning and scheduling skills developed through undergraduate coursework and professional experience this course will examine the use of project schedules as the means to manage construction projects. The relationships between project progress, labor, materials, equipment and the project timeline will be explored. The use of the project schedule as a revenue projection, revenue measuring device will be discussed. How the schedule is used to deal with major project changes such as scope reductions, natural disaster impacts and major site accidents will also be covered. Earned value will be discussed and how the schedule can assist in its determination. Fall or Spring.
Prerequisites: CME 653 or equivalent or 3 to 5 years of professional estimating experience and permission of instructor.

CME 664 Urban Project Management (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Building upon project management skills developed through undergraduate coursework and professional experience this course will look at the unique challenges of construction projects in urban settings. Topics to be addressed include but are not limited to: site logistics and their importance to a successful project, the influence of permits and codes on the project, the growing use of technology to solve urban project problems, the issues related to labor, subcontractors and suppliers in this high intensity setting. The importance of communication and project documentation will be addressed as well. Fall or Spring.
Prerequisities: CME 654 or equivalent professional experience and permission of instructor.

CME 680 Fundamentals of Microscopy (3)
Three hours of lecture/demonstration per week. Introduction to light microscopy, electron microscopy, atomic force, confocal, Raman, Near Field Optical, Correlative and other microscopic methods and their newest applications. Light microscopic techniques include brightfield, phase contrast, polarized light, Nomarski, Kohler illumination. Imaging and recording methods. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 480 and CME 680.

CME 682 Transport Processes (2)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. The relationship between wood structure and wood permeability, moisture movement, and heat transfer. Fire retardant and wood-preservation treatments. Wood drying. Unsteady-state transport processes. An advanced laboratory problem with report in wood-moisture relationships, wood drying, the relationship between wood permeability and treatability, or wood preservative treatments. Spring.
Prerequisite: CME 387 or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 682 and CME 326.

CME 685 Transmission Electron Microscopy (5)
Two hours of lecture/two hours of laboratory/demonstration/minimum of four to ten hours of individual laboratory per week. The theory and operation of the transmission electron microscope including specimen preparation, photographic technique and interpretation of micrographs. 2 credit course Spring or Fall. Five-credit course offered in spring semester only.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CME 686 Wood-Water Relationships (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Relationship between wood moisture content and the environment, electrical and thermal properties, theories of moisture sorption, hygroscopic swelling and shrinking, thermodynamics of moisture sorption, mechanism of moisture movement as it relates to activation theory. Laboratory exercises will complement the theoretical topics discussed in the lecture. Fall.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CME 770 Biodegradation of Wood (3)
Two hours of lecture and 1 hour of laboratory/demonstration/discussion per week. Biology of lignicolous fungi and other microorganisms concerning their effects on wood properties. Anatomical, biological and chemical aspects of the major types of wood decay. Spring.
Prerequisite: Introductory biology and permission of instructor.

CME 785 Scanning Electron Microscopy (5)
Two hours of lecture/demonstration/laboratory per week. Ten hours of independent laboratory experience per week. Theory and operation of the scanning electron microscope, including specimen preparation, digital imaging, and interpretation of micrographs. Fall.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CME 797 Seminar (1 - 3)
Discussion of assigned topics in the fields related to Sustainable Construction Management and Wood Science. Spring and Fall.

CME 798 RESEARCH IN RESEARCH IN SUSTAINABLE CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT AND WOOD SCIENCE (1 - 12)
Independent research topics in Sustainable Construction Management and Wood Science. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

CME 898 Professional Experience/Synthesis (1 - 6)
A supervised, documented professional work experience in the Master of Professional Studies degree program. Fall, Spring, or Summer.
Pre- or co-requisite(s): Approval of proposed study plan by advisor, Faculty, and any sponsoring organization.

CME 899 Master's Thesis Research (1 - 12)
Research and independent study for the master's thesis. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

CME 999 Doctoral Thesis Research (1 - 12)
Research and independent study for the doctoral dissertation. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

TOP

FOR

FOR 106 Introduction to Green Entrepreneurship (3)
One-week short-course. An introduction to the challenges and goals of creating a start-up venture in environmental science or technology. Recognize marketplace trends and creating commercial opportunities. Analyze feasibility and potential to create a sustainable venture. Topics include critical success factors and key start-up issues unique to science and technology. Summer.
Prerequisite(s): Completed 11th grade.

FOR 132 Orientation Seminar: F&NRM (1)
Thirteen hours of lecture and six hours of field time. An introduction to forest and natural resource management and related career paths. Indoor and outdoor lectures expand student awareness of ESF’s educational opportunities, properties, and faculty in FNRM. Fall.

FOR 201 Introduction to Watershed Hydrology (2)
One hour of online lecture per week. Introductory survey of the distribution of water throughout the atmosphere, biosphere, and the physical earth. Topics include major storages and flows of water including precipitation, evaporation, runoff, urban stormwater, and soil storage, as well as water budgets and watershed management. Spring, fall, summer.

FOR 202 Introduction to Sociology (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. General introductory principles and methods of sociology including group dynamics and development, different structural arrangement of social groups, community development and adjustment processes, relationships with the natural environment. Fall and Spring.

FOR 203 Western Civilization and the Environment (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. General survey of the history of Western civilization from ancient societies through the seventeenth century, with attention to environmental and natural resource issues and perspectives. Analysis of the rise of the West. Historic and contemporary influences of the Western tradition. Fall and Spring.

FOR 204 Natural Resources in American History (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introductory survey of American history from colonization through the twentieth century, with attention to natural resources use, allocation, and management. Environmental history and introduction to historiography. Fall and Spring.

FOR 205 Principles of Accounting (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Principles and methods used in financial and managerial accounting. Includes interpretation and effective use of financial statements through study of the accounting model, the measurement processes, data classification and terminology. Fall and Spring.

FOR 207 Introduction to Economics (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Coverage of basic theory in microeconomics and macroeconomics. Application of theory and economic models to problems at the firm and national policy levels. Exploration of topics in money and banking, globalization and economic development. Fall and Spring.

FOR 208 Introduction to Sustainable Energy Resources (2)
Two hour of seminar/lecture/discussion per week concerning sustainable energy resources. Topics include: energy use and sources, sustainable use of energy resources, energy units and conversions, renewable energy, and financial analysis of energy projects. Fall.

FOR 232 Natural Resources Ecology (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week for the first 12 weeks. Then 1.5 hours of lecture/discussion per week plus a 4.25-hour field trip for the last four weeks. The course provides an introduction to basic principles of ecology as they relate to terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems, and to natural resources. General topics for study include consideration of the physical environment, primary net production and energy flow through trophic levels, genetics and adaptation, ecosystem structure and function, competition and community dynamics, characteristics of freshwater ecosystems, and biogeochemical cycling and human impacts from local to global levels. Spring.
Prerequisites: EFB 101/EFB 102 General Biology I w/lab, or equivalent (organismal biology).

FOR 296 Special Topics in Resource Management/Forestry (1 - 3)
Experimental, interdisciplinary or special coursework at the freshman or sophomore levels. Subject matter and course format vary from semester to semester. Fall or Spring.

FOR 298 Research Internship in Forest and Natural Resources Management (1 - 3)
Students will participate in research projects consistent with their educational and professional goals. A faculty member in the Department of Forest and Natural Resources Management will serve as the student’s faculty sponsor. The student in consultation with the faculty sponsor will prepare a study plan outlining the educational goals of the apprenticeship. The faculty sponsor will generate a performance assessment and record of activities at the end of the apprenticeship. Grading Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Fall, Spring, Summer.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor

FOR 304 Adirondack Field Studies (4)
Four-week field course with five hours of lecture and 30 hours of field laboratory per week. Introduction to silvics, forest ecology and natural and cultural history as a basis for understanding forest vegetation and other natural resources. Principles and methods for the measurement of spatial and vegetative attributes of forested landscapes. Course stresses development of field ability in common plant identification, overland navigation and timber, tree, forest and habitat measurements, and synthesis of field data. Summer.

FOR 312 Sociology of Natural Resources (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. The concepts and principles of sociology as applied to natural resource questions. Concepts of community, forest-dependent communities, shared identity, and social structures of resource-based groups. The forest as an integrated social and biological community. Spring.

FOR 321 Forest Ecology and Silviculture (3)
Two hours of classroom lecture with weekly three-hour trips and labs to forests across Central New York. Survey of forest tree and stand ecology (silvics) and silviculture concepts, applications and implications for treatment of forest stands for various values. Experiential learning emphasized through a strong field component of assessing vegetation, site quality and land use history variables, and treatment alternatives to create different forest conditions. For students outside forest resources management curriculum; not open to students taking FOR 332 and FOR 334. Fall.
Prerequisite: Botany or general biology. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 321 and FOR 521.

FOR 322 Natural Resources Measurements and Sampling (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory. Principles and methods used in the measurement and quantitative analysis of natural resources, including vegetation, water, soils, recreation and wildlife. The application of sampling designs for estimating populations and inventory planning, and statistical analysis for quantifying sampling error. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): FOR 304 or equivalent; APM 391 or equivalent

FOR 323 Forest Biometrics (3)
Three hours lecture per week. Statistical techniques for analyzing problems in forest resource management including hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, simple and multiple linear regressions, and weighted least squares regression. Spring.
Prerequisite: APM 391 or equivalent.

FOR 330 Studies in Silviculture (3)
Three hours of lecture per week, with reading assignments, exams, and projects. Students gain an appreciation of silviculture and its use for influencing the character, composition, and development of forest stands, and the conceptual framework for those practices. Projects provide opportunities to explore techniques for analyzing forest stands and developing prescriptions. Fall

FOR 332 Forest Ecology (4)
Three hours of lecture/discussion and three hours of laboratory per week. Structure, function and dynamics of forest ecosystems at multiple scales, from trees to landscapes, including human interactions. Topics include ecophysiology, disturbance, succession, carbon and nutrient cycling, forest management, invasive species and climate change. Field data collection and analysis. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): FOR 232, or EFB 101 and 102, or equivalent by permission of instructor.

FOR 333 Natural Resources Managerial Economics (3)
Three hours of lecture per week and a mandatory one-day or two-day overnight field trip. Every natural resources manager must answer the question of how to use economic information to make better business and management decisions daily. Solutions require identifying alternative means of achieving given objective(s), then selecting the alternative that accomplishes this in the most resource efficient manner. Spring.
Required for Forest Resources Management, Natural Resources Management, and Sustainable Energy Management degree programs. This is a shared resource course with FOR533. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR333 and FOR533. Prerequisite: FOR 207 Introduction to Economics (or equivalent) and FOR 205 Principles of Accounting (pre- or co-requisite; or equivalent); or permission of instructor

FOR 334 Silviculture (4)
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. The practice of silviculture in managing stands to serve various landowner interests. Field trips and exercises provide opportunities to see examples of silvicultural methods under different management scenarios, and to learn and practice techniques for analyzing forest stands and developing prescriptions for their treatment. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 334 and FOR 534.

FOR 338 Meteorology (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. This is a shared resource course with FOR 538. An introduction to the atmospheric physical processes important to understanding weather and weather forecasting at the surface of the earth and macro-, synoptic-, meso-, and micro-climates. The emphasis is on synoptic and microscale phenomena. Students will learn how to access weather data on the Internet and use the data to forecast weather. At the microscale, emphasis is on describing conditions and projecting change. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 338 and FOR 538.

FOR 340 Watershed Hydrology (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Principles of physical hydrology, including the basic principles of watershed hydrology, from the relationship between watershed hydrology and the global water cycle, to the specifics of groundwater flow, stream flow generation, and water quality management at the watershed scale. Spring.
Prerequisites: FOR345 - Introduction to Soils Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 340 and FOR 540.

FOR 345 Introduction to Soils (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Introduction to the fundamentals of soil science in the context of soil as an ecosystem component. Fall.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: 1 semester of Introductory Chemistry. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 345 and FOR 545.

FOR 360 Principles of Management (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. This course focuses on the basic theories, concepts, principles and functions of modern management and administration, with an emphasis on the four functions of management: leading, planning, organizing, controlling. The four functions of management are applied to the public and private sectors, as well as for profit and not-for-profit organizations. Environmental management systems, corporate ethics and social responsibility and systematic problem solving are among the principal topics emphasized. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 360 and FOR 560.

FOR 370 Forest Management Decision Making and Planning (3)
Two hours of lecture/discussion and three hours of laboratory per week. Introduction to the components of forest management decision making and planning. The topics include forest regulation, growth and yield, and harvest scheduling given that a landowner’s goals may include more than just commercial timber production. Spring.
Prerequisites: FOR 322 and FOR 334. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 370 and FOR 570.

FOR 372 Fundamentals of Outdoor Recreation (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introduction to the programs and practices of federal, state and local agencies and private organizations involved in planning, administration and management of outdoor recreation areas. Emphasis is placed on common resource and social problems faced by area managers, and how they integrate solutions into their plans. Spring.

FOR 373 Forest Operations (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Overview of forest roads and timber harvesting; planning, construction, and maintenance of forest roads; economic and environmental characteristics of harvesting systems; safety and health; wood procurement systems; and the role of forest operations in the broader context of forest management. Fall.
Prerequisite: FOR 322 or FOR 334 or permission of instructor.

FOR 402 Professional Forestry Mentoring Program (1)
One-hour session per week supplemented by a one-day internship with a professional forester. Sessions will focus on contemporary issues in forestry including a historical perspective of the forestry profession, what it means to be a forester today, the role of certification and licensing, and professional ethics. It will serve to increase the professionalism of the forestry students. Fall.
Prerequisites: Junior status or permission of instructor.

FOR 403 Humans and the Environment: New Zealand (4)
Three and one-half week study-abroad program examines the natural and cultural history and resource management of New Zealand's South Island. Through class lecture/discussion and field excursions, students obtain an understanding of integrated resource management and sustainability in protected areas. Spring.

FOR 416 Sustainable Energy Policy (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Evaluation of the sustainable energy field as it relates to policy. Primary emphasis on the following topics: policy concerns that motivated the development and expansion of sustainable energy, a history of the policy interactions between sustainable energy pathways, and controversies that have arisen from these interactions and their effects. Spring.
Prerequisites: ENS 325, ENS 335, ENS 422

FOR 433 Silviculture Workshop (3)
Three hours of classroom or six hours field instruction, and three hours independent study per week. Advanced study of silviculture in managing stands to serve a variety of landowner objectives. Enhanced problem-solving skills related to stand analysis and prescription making. Field exercises provide practical experience in implementing silvicultural prescriptions. Spring.
Prerequisite: One prior course in silviculture.

FOR 442 Watershed Ecology and Management (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Introduction to watershed ecology and stream ecosystems. Interactions and linkages among upland, riparian and stream processes. Management and restoration associated with multiple uses of forest and rangelands. Explore influences of spatial and temporal scale, watershed and network position, disturbance regimes, and global change. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 442 and FOR 642.

FOR 454 Renewable Energy Finance and Analysis (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week concerning renewable energy finance and analysis. Topics include: the adoption and financing of renewable energy project within the context of overall economics of energy markets, financial analysis of renewable energy projects, the role of tax and subsidies in promoting the adoption of renewable sources of energy. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): FOR205 Principles of Accounting (or equivalent) and FOR333 Natural Resources Managerial Economics (or equivalent) or permission of the instructor

FOR 458 Advanced Topics in GIS (3)
Two hours of lectures and three hours of labs per week. Lecture, demonstration, discussion, and lab exercises. Apply advanced geoprocessing techniques in resource analysis and modeling. Students complete a capstone project. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): ESF300 or equivalent.

FOR 465 Natural Resources Policy (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Examination of US and NYS government roles in natural resource policy, and how government policies influence the management of public and private lands. Analysis of institutions, participants, and drivers of public lands, forest, water, wetlands, wildlife, fisheries, and fire policies. Fall.

FOR 475 Recreation Behavior and Management (3)
Three hours of lecture per week and a one-day field trip. Applies sociological and psychological concepts to: 1) individual preferences for recreation activities and settings, 2) description of recreation visitor behavior, 3) sources of management problems, 4) developing direct and indirect visitor management strategies, and 5) recreation planning decisions necessary to manage recreation settings and experiences. Students have the opportunity to apply concepts to personal recreation experiences. A one-day field trip is required. Fall.
Prerequisite: FOR 372 or equivalent, enrollment in the Natural Resource Management major or Recreation Resources and Protected Area Management minor, or permission of instructor.

FOR 476 Ecotourism and Nature Tourism (3)
Three hours of instruction per week. Overview of ecotourism and nature tourism programs and efforts around the world. Community, business, and organizational structures necessary for managing ecotourism and nature tourism programs are discussed, as are related environmental, social, and economic impacts. One-day field trip. Fall.
Prerequisite: FOR 372. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 476 and FOR 676.

FOR 478 Wilderness and Wildlands Management (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. One, two-day, overnight field trip. Review of the state and federal legislation and agency policies that frame the planning and management of public lands designated as wilderness or wildlands. Emphasizes stewardship and management for protection of natural resources and human values. Concepts include carrying capacity, preservation of ecological conditions and processes, visitor management, dispersed recreation management, human values and benefits, and planning frameworks. Fall.
Prerequisite: FOR 372 or equivalent. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 478 and FOR 678.

FOR 480 Urban Forestry (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Evaluation and management of urban greenspace resources, with emphasis on urban trees, in the context of other values and management processes in urban areas. Class practice in evaluating urban greenspace and tree resources. Fall.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status in any Forest and Natural Resources Management programs or permission of instructor for juniors and seniors in other programs. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 480 and FOR 680.

FOR 481 Introduction to Arboriculture (3)
Two hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Overview of the practice of arboriculture. Emphasis will be on site evaluation for species selection, planting, pruning, fertilization and removal of trees in an urban environment. Spring.
Prerequisite: Botany or Ecology.

FOR 485 Business and Managerial Law (3)
Three hours lecture/discussion per week. An introduction to the law governing business and management. Examination of sources of law, court systems and trials, constitutional foundations, criminal law, contracts, employer and employee law, business organization law, torts, personal property and motor vehicle law, landlord and tenant law, home ownership law, and wills and estates. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the Construction Management, Natural Resources Management, or Sustainable Energy Management majors, or permission of instructor.

FOR 487 Environmental Law and Policy (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introduction to the approaches used in US environmental law. Analysis of common law and statutory designs and strategies used to address environmental problems. Examination of common law environmental remedies, Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Endangered Species Act, hazardous waste, and other environmental laws. Fall.
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 487 and FOR 687.

FOR 489 Natural Resources Law and Policy (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. An introduction to the law governing the management of natural resources. Examination of the history and constitutional basis of natural resources law, wildlife and biodiversity law, protected lands law, water law, marine fisheries law, rangelands law, minerals law, and forest law. Spring.
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 489 and FOR 689.

FOR 490 Integrated Resources Management (3)
One hour of lecture, three hours of laboratory, and three hours of supervised work per week. This capstone course emphasizes the assimilation, integration, and interpretation of the biophysical and socioeconomic sciences. It provides students with the opportunity to integrate skills and knowledge accumulated from professional and supporting coursework. A written comprehensive management plan, also presented orally in the field and classroom, provides the central vehicle by which students demonstrate their abilities as future natural resource managers. Spring.
Prerequisite: Senior status in Forest and Natural Resources Management.

FOR 491 Sustainable Energy Management Capstone (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. This capstone course emphasizes the assimilation, integration, and interpretation of the physical and socioeconomic sciences. It provides students with the opportunity to integrate skills and knowledge accumulated from professional and supporting coursework. A written comprehensive energy resource plan, also presented orally classroom, provides the central vehicle by which students demonstrate their abilities as future energy resource managers. Spring.
Prerequisites: ENS 325, ENS 335, ENS 422, and FOR 333, or Permission of Instructor

FOR 495 Undergraduate Teaching Assistance (1 - 3)
Undergraduate students gain experience as teaching assistants. They assist the instructor with the teaching and learning experience, assist students with learning course concepts, and mentor students on how to succeed in an undergraduate course. Responsibilities vary by section and instructor. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Prior completion of course to be assisted with grade of B or better.

FOR 496 Special Topics in Resource Management/Forestry (1 - 3)
Experimental and developmental courses in new areas of resource management/forestry or areas not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Topics may include but are not limited to the biological, physical, and social dimensions and the many and varied resources of forest lands and forestry. Specific detailed course descriptions for each course taught under the FOR 496 designation are available for student perusal. Fall, Spring and Summer.

FOR 498 Independent Study in Forest Resources Management (1 - 6)
Independent research or study in resource management/forestry for selected undergraduate students. Selection of subject area, nature of the research or study, and number of credit hours determined by student in conference with appropriate faculty member; initiative in taking FOR 498 rests with the student. Final written report is required for record. Fall, Spring and Summer.
Prerequisite: Cumulative GPA of at least 2.50 and approval of the adviser and instructor.

FOR 499 Internship in Forest and Natural Resources Management (1 - 12)
Full- or part-time engagement as volunteer or employee working for off-campus resource management/forestry/renewable energy organization under guidance of external supervisor. Record of activities and final written report is required for record. Junior or senior status, cumulative GPA of at least 2.5, and written approval of a study plan by faculty advisor and field supervisor must be submitted prior to its commencement. Fall, Spring and Summer.
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status. Must have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5.

FOR 501 Introduction to Environmental Resources Management (2)
Two-week, field-based examination of forest, water, wildlife, recreation, and mineral resources and their management in New York State and surrounding states, framed by public administration, political science, economic, human dimension, and biophysical concepts. Emphasis is on experiential learning via a series of field trips. Fall (mid-August).
Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the ERM MPS degree program.

FOR 513 Adirondack Forest Ecology and Management (2 - 3)
One-week, field-based examination of sustainable forest management in the Adirondacks, framed by concepts and issues associated with plant and wildlife ecology, silviculture, and forest management. Contemporary research on central Adirondack forests is featured based on work at the Huntington Wildlife Forest. Emphasis is on experiential learning via a series of trips to, and laboratories in, the forest. Fall (late summer).
Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 513 and FOR 513.

FOR 519 Green Entrepreneurship (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Explore challenges and goals of creating a start-up venture in environmental science or technology. Recognize trends in the marketplace, and where commercial opportunities can be created. Analyze feasibility and potential to create a sustainable venture. Other topic areas include critical success factors and key start-up issues unique to environmental science and technology firms. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): FOR 207 Introduction to Economics or equivalent; or permission of instructor.

FOR 521 Forest Ecology and Silviculture (3)
Two hours of classroom lecture with weekly three-hour trips and labs to forests across Central New York. Study of the conceptual underpinnings and application of forest ecology via explorations of the environmental complex and silvicultural systems. Experiential learning is emphasized through a strong field component of assessing vegetation, site and land use history variables, and treatment alternatives to create different forest conditions. Provides a study of trees as individuals and communities, and how we can manipulate them both using planned methods and techniques to affect sustained production of a wide variety of forest ecosystem benefits, services, and values. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): Botany or general biology. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 321 and FOR 521. Note: Not open to students taking FOR 534.

FOR 522 Forest Mensuration (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Principles and methods used in the measurement of standing trees, forest stands, forest products and growth. The application of sampling designs and analysis for forest valuation and inventory planning. Graduate students will be required to complete two additional term projects in addition to those required of undergraduate students. Fall.
Prerequisites: FOR 304 or equivalent. Co-requisites: APM 391 or equivalent. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 322 and FOR 522.

FOR 523 Tropical Ecology (3)
Preparatory lectures(1.5 hr/wk) coupled with intensive spring break field study on a tropical island in the Caribbean. Principles of tropical ecology, resource management, and island biogeography are presented. Field trips to a variety of tropical ecosystems including rain forest, coral reefs, crater lakes, montane rain forest with comparison to north temperate ecosystems. Additional fee covers costs of travel, lodging. Spring. Prerequisite(s): General Ecology
Prerequisite: General Ecology.

FOR 524 Forest Biometrics (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Statistical methods and techniques including hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, simple and multiple linear regressions used for analyzing forest resource management problems and developing forest growth and yield models. Graduate students will be required to write a research paper in addition to those required of undergraduate students. Spring.
Prerequisite: APM 391 or equivalent. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 323 and FOR 524.

FOR 530 Studies in Silviculture (3)
Three hours of lecture per week, with reading assignments, exams, and projects. Students gain an appreciation of silviculture and its use for influencing the character, composition, and development of forest stands, and the conceptual framework for those practices. Projects provide opportunities to explore techniques for analyzing forest stands and developing prescriptions. Fall

FOR 532 Forest Ecology (4)
Four hours of lecture/discussion and three hours of laboratory per week. Structure, function and dynamics of forest ecosystems at multiple scales, from trees to landscapes, including human interactions. Topics include ecophysiology, disturbance, succession, carbon and nutrient cycling, forest management, invasive species and climate change. Field data collection and analysis. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate coursework in biology/ecology; or by permission of instructor

FOR 533 Natural Resources Managerial Economics (3)
Three hours of lecture per week and a mandatory one-day or two-day overnight field trip. Every natural resources manager must answer the question of how to use economic information to make better business and management decisions daily. Solutions require systematically analyzing economic tools and models to identify alternative means of achieving given objective(s), then selecting the alternative that accomplishes this in the most resource efficient manner. Spring.
Required in the Master of Forestry degree program. This is a shared resource course with FOR333. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR333 and FOR533. Prerequisite(s): Microeconomics (e.g., FOR207 Introduction to Economics or equivalent); Calculus (e.g., APM105 Survey of Calculus and Its Applications I or equivalent); Principles of Accounting (pre- or co-requisite; e.g., FOR205 Principles of Accounting or equivalent); or permission of instructor

FOR 534 Silvicultural Practice (4)
Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. The practice of silviculture in managing stands to serve various landowner interests, and explore the conceptual framework for those practices. Field trips and exercises provide opportunities to see examples of silvicultural methods under different management scenarios and to learn and practice techniques for analyzing forest stands and developing prescriptions for their treatment. Laboratory projects include reports that explore the conceptual and technical rationale for silvicultural decisions. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 334 and FOR 534.

FOR 535 Advanced Forest Soils (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week concerning the current state-of-the-art in forest soils. Effect of intensive forest management on soil, soil-site-species relationships, forest fertilization tree nutrition. Application of forest soils information to silviculture. Spring.
Prerequisite: FOR 332 or beginning courses in soils and silviculture.

FOR 538 Meteorology (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. An introduction to the atmospheric physical processes important to understanding weather and weather forecasting at the surface of the earth and macro-, synoptic-, meso-, and micro-climates. The emphasis is on synoptic and micro-scale phenomena. Students will learn how to access weather data on the Internet and use that data to forecast weather. At the micro-scale, emphasis is on describing conditions and projecting change. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 338 and FOR 538.

FOR 540 Watershed Hydrology (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. This course provides students with a detailed understnading of watershed hydrology, water quality and water management at the watershed scale, and offer the students the opportunity to gain in depth knowledge on one topic of particular interest to them through completion of a term project, and the development of a teaching/research presentation and interactive discussion with students in the class. Spring.
Prerequisites: FOR345 - Introduction to Soils Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 340 and FOR 540.

FOR 545 Introduction to Soils (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Introduction to the fundamentals of soil science in the context of soil as an ecosystem component. Fall.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: one semester of Introductory Chemistry or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 345 and FOR 545.

FOR 546 Forest Soil Genesis, Classification, and Mapping (3)
Three hours of lecture per week during the first two-thirds of the semester. The last third of the semester is devoted to fieldwork and production of a soil map. Models of soil genesis, application of the U.S. system of soil taxonomy, and soil mapping. Spring.
Prerequisite: Introductory course in soil science.

FOR 557 Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion/recitation per week. Fundamental concepts of Geographic Information Systems (GIS); raster and vector data models and geodatabase design; common raster and vector data analysis tools used in the fields of forest and natural resources management, environmental science,conservation biology, ecology, and landscape architecture; cartographic model construction; and map design. Completion of an independent project is required. Fall
Prerequisite(s): none

FOR 560 Principles of Management for Environmental Professionals (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. This course focuses on the basic theories, concepts, principles and functions of modem management and administration, with an emphasis on the four functions of management: leading. planning, organizing, controlling. The four functions of management are applied to the public and private sectors, as well as for profit and not-for-profit organizations. Environmental management systems, corporate ethics and social responsibility and systematic problem solving are among the principal topics emphasized. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): none.

FOR 570 Forest Management Decision Making and Planning (3)
Two hours of lecture/discussion and three hours of laboratory per week. Introduction to the components of forest management decision making and planning. The topics include forest regulation, growth and yield, and harvest scheduling given that a landowner’s goals may include more than just commercial timber production. Sensitivity analysis of parameters used in forest management planning. Spring.
Prerequisites: FOR 322/522 and FOR 334/534 or permission of the instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 370 and FOR 570.

FOR 573 Forest Operations (3)
Two hours lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Overview of forest roads and timber harvesting; planning, construction, and maintenance of forest roads; economic and environmental characteristics of harvesting systems; safety and health; wood procurement systems; and the role of forest operations in the broader context of forest management. Emphasis on application of knowledge, requiring a written report with a problem-solving focus. Fall.
Prerequisite: FOR 322 and FOR 334 or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 373 and FOR 573.

FOR 601 Environmental Resources Management Workshop (2)
Three-week examination of a current topic in environmental resources management. Synthesis course that applies environmental resources management knowledge and techniques through a group consulting assignment for a government or non-government environmental resource organization. Spring (late Spring).
Prerequisite(s): 501: Introduction to Environmental Resources Management and completion of majority of ERM MPS coursework.

FOR 607 Restoration Ecology (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Students investigate and apply major ecological concepts to ecosystem restoration, including abiotic and biotic resource limitation, ecophysiology, trophic webs, disturbance, climate change, and alternative ecosystem states. Diverse readings and interactive class discussions have broad relevance to restoration practitioners, conservation biologists, and environmental engineers. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): an ecology course or permission of instructor.

FOR 610 Environmental Resources Business (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of business accounting and finance and their application to environmental management. The course is small enterprise oriented with emphasis on practical applications and problem solving techniques. The primary objective is to provide the student with the tools to understand and solve the basic accounting and financial problems confronting businesses and organizations in the environmental management field. Topics covered include basic accounting techniques, financial analysis, time value of money, valuation of assets, capital budgeting techniques, capital structure theory. Spring.

FOR 620 Silvicultural Concepts and Applications (3)
Three hours of lecture or six hours of field studies and three hours of independent study per week. Advanced study of silviculture, including the conceptual basis for designing prescriptions to serve a variety of landowner objectives. Concurrent independent work on assigned projects enhances problem-solving skills related to stand analysis and prescription making. Reports articulate the conceptual basis for recommendations, and discuss likely outcomes based upon findings from research and computer simulations. Field exercises provide practical experience in implementing silvicultural prescriptions. Spring.
Prerequisite: previous studies in silviculture at the baccalaureate or higher level.

FOR 626 Plant Tissue Culture Methods (3)
Two hours of lecture and discussion and three hours of laboratory per week. Introduction to plant tissue culture for biotechnology research and as a propagation method. Emphasis will be on learning laboratory instrumentation and techniques for establishing cell cultures, producing transgenic cell lines, and regenerating whole plants. In addition to the scheduled lab exercises, an independent micropropagation or transformation project will be required. Fall.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BTC 426 and FOR/EFB 626.

FOR 635 Forest Soils and Their Analyses (3)
One hour of lecture, one hour of recitation, four hours of field and laboratory study of forest soils, emphasizing plant-soil relationships per week. Stress on quantification of plant-soil diagnostic techniques and their interpretation. Spring (odd years).
Prerequisite: FOR 446. Note: Background in physical and biological sciences recommended.

FOR 642 Watershed Ecology and Management (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Introduction to watershed ecology and stream ecosystems. Interactions and linkages among upland, riparian and stream processes. Management and restoration associated with multiple uses of forest and rangelands. Explore influences of spatial and temporal scale, watershed and network position, disturbance regimes, and global change. Students will apply course concepts to an independent research project. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 442 and FOR 642.

FOR 658 Advanced GIS (3)
Five hours of class meeting per week. Lecture, demonstration, discussion, and lab exercises. Students learn to apply and evaluate advanced geoprocessing techniques in resource analysis and modeling. Students complete and present a capstone project. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): FOR557 or equivalent. This is a shared resource course and credit will not be granted for both FOR 458 and FOR 658.

FOR 659 Advanced GIS (3)
Two hours of lectures and three hours of labs week. Lecture, demonstration, discussion, and lab exercises. Students learn to apply and evaluate advanced geoprocessing techniques in resource analysis and modeling. Students complete and present a capstone project. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): FOR557 or equivalent

FOR 665 Natural Resources Policy (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Analysis and application of political, policy formation, and policy administration theories to natural resources. Examination of drivers of U.S. natural resources policies. Analysis of private lands, public lands, forest, wildlife, endangered species, water, fire, and certification policies. Focus is on U.S. natural resources policies. Spring.
Prerequisite: graduate standing.

FOR 670 Resource and Environmental Economics (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. An introductory course in resource and environmental economics. Apply economic theories and models to analyze decisions concerning the use of forest, marine, and water resources and to analyze policy tools for mitigating pollution created as a result of production and consumption. Fall.
Prerequisite: A course in economics.

FOR 676 Ecotourism and Nature Tourism (3)
Three hours of instruction per week. Overview of ecotourism and nature tourism programs and efforts around the world. Community, business, and organizational structures necessary for managing ecotourism and nature tourism programs. Environmental, social, and economic impacts. One-day field trip. Graduate level readings, assignments, and exams. Fall.
Prerequisite: FOR 372. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 476 and FOR 676.

FOR 678 Wilderness and Wildlands Management (3)
Three hours of lecture per week and one, two-day, overnight field trip. Reviews the state and federal legislation and agency policies that frame the planning and management of public lands designated as wilderness or wildlands. Emphasizes the use of wilderness research information for adaptive management approaches to stewardship of and planning for protection of natural resources and human values. Fall.
Prerequisite: FOR 372 or equivalent. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 478 and FOR 678.

FOR 680 Urban Forestry (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Evaluation and management of urban greenspace resources, with emphasis on urban trees, in the context of other values and management processes in urban areas. Class practice in evaluating urban greenspace and tree resources, development of a research paper on urban forestry. Fall.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 480 and FOR 680.

FOR 685 Business and Managerial Law (3)
Three hours lecture/discussion per week. An introduction to the law governing business and management. Examination of sources of law, constitutional foundations, ethics, court systems and trials, contracts, agency, consumer law, security interests, bankruptcy, entrepreneurship law, corporations, torts, criminal law, personal property, real property, and wills and estates. Spring.

FOR 687 Environmental Law and Policy (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introduction to the approaches used in US environmental law. Analysis of common law and statutory designs and strategies used to address environmental problems. Examination of common law environmental remedies, Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Endangered Species Act, hazardous waste, and other environmental laws. Analysis and application of primary and secondary legal sources to business and management problems. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 487 and FOR 687.

FOR 689 Natural Resources Law and Policy (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. An introduction to the law governing the management of natural resources. Examination of the history and constitutional basis of natural resources law, wildlife and biodiversity law, protected lands law, water law, marine fisheries law, rangelands law, minerals law, and forest law. Analysis and application of natural resources law research and commentary. Spring.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 489 and FOR 689.

FOR 690 Integrated Resources Management (3)
One hour of lecture, three hours of laboratory and three hours of supervised work per week.This capstone course emphasizes the assimilation, integration and interpretation of the biophysical and socioeconomic sciences. It provides students with the opportunity to integrate skills and knowledge accumulated from professional and supporting coursework. The final deliverable is a written management plan. Spring.

FOR 692 Capstone in Forest and Natural Resources Management (3)
Three hours of seminar discussions and presentations per week. Students will integrate and apply their knowledge of forest natural resources management to practical problems of their own design in their areas of interest, in consultation with clients whom they identify to be in need of their professional services. Class sessions include opportunities to develop advanced knowledge and professional skills, such as research, analysis, management, and communication. The final project outcomes are delivered through written reports and oral presentations. Fall.

FOR 694 Writing for Scientific Publication (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Students will improve their skills in technical reporting by preparing a manuscript suitable for submission to a scientific journal. Topics include selection of an appropriate journal, design of effective figures and tables, sequential preparation of sections of the manuscript, writing tips, peer review and ethical issues. Spring.

FOR 770 Ecological Economics and Policy (3)
Three hours of seminar per week. A transdisciplinary approach to understand the interface of human and ecological systems, includes concepts and methods of ecologists, economists, and social scientists. Focus is on historical, conceptual and epistemological foundations. Draws on contemporary economic and policy thought, evolutionary biology, ecology, systems theory, social psychology, and environmental ethics. Spring.
Prerequisite: Graduate coursework in ecology or economics; doctoral student standing, or permission of instructor.

FOR 796 Special Topics in Forest Resources Management (1 - 3)
Lectures, seminars, and discussion. Advanced topics in resource management and policy. Check schedule of classes for details of subject matter. Fall and/or Spring.

FOR 797 Seminar (1)
Individual presentation and group discussion concerning current topics of concern to natural resources or their management. Fall and Spring.

FOR 798 Research Problems in Forest and Natural Resources Management (1 - 12)
Special investigation and analysis of forest and natural resources management topics. A study plan and a final written report are required. Fall and Spring.

FOR 898 Professional Experience/Internship (1 - 6)
Professional experience/internship which applies, enriches, or complements formal coursework. All professional experiences/internships must have a signed experience/internship agreement on record with the advisor. Graded on an “S/U” basis. Fall, Spring, and Summer.

FOR 899 Master’s Thesis Research (1 - 12)
Investigation leading to the completion of a Master’s thesis. Graded on an “S/U” basis. Fall, Spring, and Summer.

FOR 999 Doctoral Thesis Research (1 - 12)
Investigation leading to the completion of the doctoral thesis. Graded on an "S/U" basis. Fall, Spring and Summer.

TOP

FTC

FTC 101 Trigonometry for Natural Resource Technicians (3)
Forty hours of lecture and sixteen hours of recitation conducted over a four-week period. A review of selected geometry and algebra topics, and an introduction to trigonometry and its applications. Emphasis on pythagorean theorem, quadratic equations, rectangular coordinate systems, right triangle trigonometry, oblique triangle trigonometry, the Law of Sines, the Law of Cosines and the graphing of trigonometric functions. Graphic calculator required. Summer.

FTC 105 Tree and Forest Biology (4)
A four-week summer program having 45 hours of lecture and 45 hours of lab. An introduction to the biology of trees and the diversity of animal life commonly found in forests. Field labs concentrate on biological relationships in Adirondack forests. Summer.
Pre- or co-requisite(s): Four credits in biology.

FTC 200 Dendrology (3)
Thirty eight hours of lecture, and forty hours of field laboratory. Characteristics, distribution, and uses of tree species in North America. Identifying plant species using common and scientific names, from leaf, twig, fruit, or bark samples. Habitats, species associates, and succession of plants, including some invasive species. Fall.

FTC 202 Introduction to Surveying (3)
Twenty eight hours of lecture and 72 hours of laboratory and field exercises. The course is an introduction to the theory and practice of plane surveying. Emphasis is on developing individual skills and techniques through small crew projects where it is necessary to handle typical surveying equipment in actual field situations. Lecture topics include the theory of measurements and errors, field record keeping procedures, mathematics for plane surveying, introduction to field problems, introduction to map use and preparation, concepts of land tenure systems and basic computer aided drafting. Students tour the various offices found at the County courthouse and participate in a research exercise. Field projects include traversing using common forester’s and surveyor’s tools and instruments, mapping including field and office procedure, and proficiency projects in handling various surveying instruments. Fall.

FTC 204 Introduction to Natural Resources Measurements (4)
Forty-five hours of lecture and sixty hours of field/laboratory. A study of the tools and techniques used to measure primary forest products and inventory and/or measure natural resources, such as timber, water, biomass, carbon stocks, wildlife habitat, recreation use and impact, and plant diversity. Professional presentation of forest inventory data in the form of technical reports. Basic forest sampling methods are used and compared, and associated statistical methods are learned and applied. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): none.

FTC 205 Computer Aided Drafting and Design 1 (2)
Eighteen hours of lecture and 36 hours of laboratory time. An introductory course in computer aided drafting. Emphasis is on developing individual skills and techniques for making professional quality drawings and maps. Topics include the drawing, editing, layer management, dimensioning, survey computations, data reduction, contouring and Geographic Information Systems. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): FTC 202 - Introduction to Surveying

FTC 206 Forest Ecology (4)
Fifty-one hours of lecture and fifty-six hours of laboratory and field. Study of interactions between forest vegetation and the environment. Considers how sunlight, moisture, soils and climate impact species presence, composition and growth. Human dimension of forest ecology, including critical thinking and evaluation of environmental issues. Fall.

FTC 207 Communications and Safety (3)
Twenty six hours lecture and fifty eight hours laboratory provides students with technical competence. Students develop study skills, handwriting skills, computer skills and communication skills including how to use library services. A resume and cover letter will be prepared for use in the job search process. Students receive training on the proper use and maintenance of forest hand tools and chainsaws. Students receive advanced training in the use and maintenance of chainsaws, and skidding equipment. First Aid and CPR/AED are covered as well as wilderness first aid. Prepares students for living in remote areas. Fall
Prerequisite(s): none.

FTC 208 Remote Sensing and GIS Technology (3)
Thirty hours of lecture and forty-five hours of laboratory. This course is an introduction to the use of remote sensing and geographic information systems in the field of natural resources. Students practice interpretation of aerial photographs and digital imagery to measure horizontal distances and azimuths and calculate ground area. Acquisition, creation and basic analysis of spatial data are also emphasized. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): None.

FTC 209 Timber Harvesting (2)
Eighteen hours of lecture and thirty six hours of laboratory or field instruction. Student learns basic harvesting methods with northeastern United States emphasis and its relationship to other forest uses. Student understand the role of best management practices in timber harvesting. A technical competence in timber sale contract administration and basic timber appraisal is gained. Fall.
Co-requisite(s): FTC 204, FTC 207.

FTC 210 Wildlife Techniques (2)
Eighteen hours of lecture and thirty-six hours field and laboratory time. Standard methods and techniques for measuring, monitoring, controlling and evaluating wildlife populations are discussed, demonstrated and/or practiced. Further practice in measuring and evaluating wildlife habitat. Identification of common birds, amphibians, reptiles and mammals by sight and sound. Fall.
Prerequisites: FTC 200, FTC 202, and FTC 204.

FTC 211 Silviculture (3)
Thirty hours lecture and seventy five hours field lab. Regeneration and tending of forest stands. Physical and chemical treatments used for growing forests in the northeastern states. Introduction to silviculture in the southern and western states. Methods for quantifying and predicting forest growth. Marking timber stands for harvesting. Establishing new stands. Spring.
Prerequisites: FTC 200, FTC 204, and FTC 206.

FTC 212 Adirondack Cultural Ecology (2)
Twenty two hours of lecture and twenty eight hours of field laboratory. Development of the Adirondack Park as influenced by the exploitation and eventual conservation of the region’s natural resources. An historical review and contemporary assessment of the political, economic, and sociologic issues that define and influence Adirondack culture. Guest speakers, public meeting attendance, and field trips within the Park reinforce cultural history and emphasize the role of individuals, organizations, and agencies in managing the unique blend of public and private lands that comprise the Park. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): none

FTC 213 Forest Inventory Practicum (2)
Six hours of lecture and sixty four hours of field/laboratory. A practical field problem requiring students to use professional methods of collecting, analyzing, and presenting forest inventory data. Inventory of the timber/biomass resource and the development of a forest type map are emphasized. Spring.
Prerequisites: FTC 200, FTC 202, FTC 204, and FTC 208.

FTC 214 Leadership and Organizational Performance (2)
Twenty-two hours of lecture and twenty-four hours of laboratory time. Provides students with technical competence and decision-making abilities. Students learn about company and agency organization; the selection, placement, training, and evaluation of workers; managing crews and the techniques of foremanship; and human relations in the workplace, with emphasis on the special personnel problems of the forest and surveying industries. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): FTC 207 Communications and Safety

FTC 217 Wildland Firefighting and Ecology (2)
Twenty-five hours of lecture and sixteen hours of laboratory and field. An introduction to fire science. Learn basic principles of fire ecology, behavior, danger rating and control. Practical experience conducting a prescribed burn. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): FTC 200, FTC 204, FTC 206, FTC 210.

FTC 219 Introduction to Forest Recreation (1)
Fourteen hours of lecture and twenty hours field and laboratory time. A study of forest-recreation resources, their importance to humans, and of the basic history, laws and principles underlying forest-recreation management in the United States. The technical aspects of recreation management are emphasized, as is the study of public-land management, including wilderness. Spring.
Pre-requisites: FTC 207.

FTC 221 Natural Resources Management (3)
Thirty-five hours of lecture and thirty hours of laboratory and field. Addresses common issues in organizing a forest property to meet stakeholder goals. Techniques of growth and resource measurement, monitoring, and evaluation are emphasized. Examples and case studies of forest management and production activities are presented. A final project involves the application of knowledge accumulated at the ESF Ranger School in a management plan for an assigned forest property. Spring.
Prerequisites: FTC 204, FTC 206 and FTC 208.

FTC 224 Field Applications (1)
Forty hours field laboratory visiting various facilities, including private, state, industrial, nongovernmental organizations and other groups. Students will learn how these agencies address financial, political, and environmental concerns within their professional fields. Spring
Prerequisite(s): none

FTC 225 Timber Transportation and Utilization (3)
Forty three lecture hours and forty three laboratory hours. Students gain knowledge of graveled forest road administration, location, design, construction, and maintenance. Differences in wood structure, and their effects on wood products of various species are studied. Spring.
Prerequisites: FTC 208, and FTC 210. Co-requisite: 259.

FTC 234 Wildlife Conservation (3)
Thirty-eight hours of lecture and twenty hours field and laboratory time. An introduction to the history and evolution of wildlife-related policies and laws, and to the biological, ecological, economical and sociological principles underlying wildlife management and conservation efforts in the United States. Terrestrial vertebrate animals serve as the basis of discussions and case studies. Students improve their communication skills by presenting papers and speeches on wildlife-related topics. Spring.
Prerequisite: FTC 206.

FTC 236 Interpretive Techniques in Forest Recreation (2)
Twenty-eight hours of lecture and twenty-four hours field and laboratory time. Students complete NAI's Certified Interpretive Guide course, and more closely study the relationship between interpretation and recreation management. Students improve their communication skills by presenting papers, speeches and interpretive posters. Spring.
Pre-requisites: FTC 200, FTC 202, FTC 204, and FTC 208.

FTC 237 Introduction to Water and Soil Resources (3)
Thirty-seven hours of lecture and twenty-four hours of laboratory and field. Introduction to watershed ecology and soil science. Interactions among upland, riparian, stream and wetland systems, including the hydrologic cycle. Study and measurement of soil physical, chemical and biological characteristics and processes. Recognize soil and water resource management and protection issues associated with multiple uses of forest lands. Spring.
Prerequisites: FTC 202, FTC 206, and FTC 208.

FTC 238 Forest Insects and Disease (3)
Thirty-five hours of lecture and twenty-six hours of laboratory and field. An introduction to forest insects and diseases. Explore ecological roles and identify selected insects and pathogens based on morphology, signs and symptoms. Discuss integrated pest management and other control measures. Spring.
Prerequisites: FTC 200, and FTC 206.

FTC 239 GIS Applications (2)
Fifteen hours of lecture and forty-five hours of laboratory. Introduction to acquisition, manipulation, and creation of geospatial data using geographic information systems. Build geodatabases, use geoprocessing tools, work with attribute data in both Excel and ArcGIS. Plan and conduct a simple geospatial analysis project. Spring.
Prerequisites: FTC 202, and FTC 208.

FTC 251 Advanced Surveying Measurements and Computations (4)
Thirty hours of lecture and eighty-five hours of field and laboratory time. Advanced survey measurements and computational techniques including traverse calculations, rectangular coordinates, statistical analysis of surveying data, state plane coordinates, meridian determination, partition of land, trigonometric leveling and horizontal control are explored. Students will make the necessary surveying measurements in the field and be expected to complete various surveying measurements using a calculator and computer. Spring.
Prerequisite: FTC 202. Co-requisite: FTC 257.

FTC 253 Survey Law (3)
Thirty five hours of lecture and 30 hours of laboratory time. The course is a study of courthouse real property research, property boundary determination by various methods, case and statute law as it relates to real property and land surveying, legal research and the liability and professionalism of the practicing land surveyor. Spring.
Prerequisite: FTC 202.

FTC 255 Boundary Surveying (3)
Thirty hours of lecture and forty-five hours of field and laboratory time. A study of the procedures necessary to conduct a retracement survey including preliminary office procedures, field practices, and preparation of final survey documents. Students will complete a retracement survey and use the compiled data in a mock trial. Spring.
Prerequisite: FTC 202. Co-requisite: FTC 253.

FTC 256 Subdivision Surveys (2)
Twenty hours of lecture and 30 hours of laboratory time. An introduction to the preparation of a multi-lot subdivision of a parcel of real estate. Development of a subdivision in relation to topography, zoning requirements, utility services, existing and proposed roads or streets and client requests. Students learn to design minor storm drain facilities in relation to the subdivisions. The student will incorporate all of the above while using survey software. Spring.
Prerequisite: FTC 202. Co-requisite: FTC 259.

FTC 257 Construction and Topographic Surveys (3)
Twenty-five hours lecture and sixty hours field and laboratory. A study of the various methods and techniques used to perform construction and topographic surveys and develop topographic maps. Theory, mathematics, and layout of circular, spiral and vertical curves. Layout of various construction projects including buildings, roads, pipelines and bridges will be discussed. Earthwork, staking and cross-section calculations will also be covered. Students complete a topographic mapping project and develop maps using appropriate surveying and mapping software. Spring.
Co-requisites: FTC 252 and FTC 259.

FTC 259 Computer Aided Drafting and Design II (3)
Eighteen hours of lecture and seventy hours of laboratory time. An additional course in computer aided drafting and design. Emphasis is on developing individual skills and techniques for making professional quality drawings, maps and plats. Topics include the drawing, editing, layer management, dimensioning, survey computations, data reduction, surface modelling and GIS. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): FTC 202 - Introduction to Surveying, FTC 205 Computer aided Drafting and Design I.

FTC 298 Independent Study in Forest Technology (1 - 6)
Independent study in forest technology to apply, enhance or supplement forest technology or related natural resource education. Objectives and scope of the project are negotiated in a learning contract between the student and instructor(s), with course admission based on permission of the instructor(s). Limited to those who have attended the complete regular SFT program, or those who have graduated from another forest technology program or a related natural resource program, or to students enrolled in any ESF program other than SFT. A maximum of six credit hours may be taken by any student in total. Semesters as arranged. Fall, Spring or Summer.


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