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Course Numbering System

100-499: Undergraduate courses for which no graduate credit may be given.

500-599: Graduate courses designed expressly for areas of specialization in post-baccalaureate programs. Qualified undergraduate students may enroll by permission of the instructor.

600-699: Graduate courses designed expressly for advanced levels of specialization. Undergraduate students with a cumulative grade point average of 3.000 or better may enroll in these courses with an approved petition.

700-999: Advanced graduate level courses for which no undergraduate students may register. Shared resources courses, designated as 400/500 or 400/600, are designed when the topic coverage of both courses is the same. Separate course syllabuses are developed expressly differentiating the requirements and evaluative criteria between the undergraduate course and the graduate course. No type of cross-listing may be offered unless approved by the ESF faculty.

Courses

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PSE

PSE 132 Orientation Seminar: Paper Science and Engineering (1)
One hour lecture per week or three-hour lab/field trip per week. Introduction to campus resources available to ensure academic success. Introduction to paper engineering as a field of inquiry and career path. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 132 and PSE 132.

PSE 200 Introduction to Papermaking (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Historical and commercial consideration of the paper industry. Topics include wood handling, pulping, stock furnish, stock preparation and paper machine operation. Introductory discussions of papermaking technology, materials and paper making processes including environmental aspects. Fall.

PSE 201 The Art and Early History of Papermaking (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of studio per week. This papermaking course provides a historical (Asia - Far East) and artistic perspective in both lecture and studio formats. History lectures will include the influence of paper in non-western cultures as a practical medium for human communication and as a versatile medium for expression of various paper art forms. Studio sessions will vary but generally will focus on historical papermaking by hand using non-western techniques and those paper art forms of far eastern origin. More modern techniques in the creation of paper art forms will also be explored in studio sessions. Fall.

PSE 202 Pulp and Paper Laboratory Skills (1)
Three hours of laboratory per week provide a working knowledge of fundamental papermaking concepts. "Survival" skills learned enable students to perform well in subsequent PSE courses as well as summer employment. Operations and skills include: pulp preparation and analysis, papermaking, paper testing, report writing and team work. Spring.
Pre- or co-requisite: PSE 200 (concurrent registration).

PSE 223 Introduction to Lignocellulosics (4)
Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Topics included: structure and chemistry of lignocellulosic materials such as wood, including bark, agriculture residues, and grasses; major (cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin) and minor constituents (extractives, proteins, ash); biosynthesis, distribution, structure, properties, conversion into energy, chemicals, and other products. Spring.
Pre-requisite: One semester of organic chemistry.

PSE 296 Special Topics in Engineering (1 - 3)
Provides experimental, interdisciplinary, or special coursework at the freshman and sophomore levels within the field of environmental resources engineering. Subject matter and course format vary from semester to semester and section to section. Fall and Spring.

PSE 304 Mill Experience (2)
Twelve weeks full time pulp or paper mill employment approved by the Department between the junior and senior years. The student must submit a comprehensive report and give a presentation to fulfill this requirement. Fall, Spring and Summer.
Pre- or co-requisites: PSE 300, PSE 302.

PSE 305 Co-op Experience (2)
One semester full-time pulp or paper mill experience. Work experience as an engineering intern on company-assigned projects. Traditionally, the student works for a semester and adjacent summer also taking PSE 304. The student must submit a comprehensive report and give a presentation to fulfill this requirement. Fall and Spring.
Pre- or co-requisites: PSE 300, PSE 302.

PSE 350 Pulping and Bleaching Processes (3)
Two hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Discussion of the principles and fundamental chemistry applied in chemical pulping, chemical bleaching, and deinking processes. Transport and physical operations involved in fiber dispersion, washing, screening and refining. Conduct experiments in chemical pulping, chemical bleaching, de-inking, fiber refining and pulp evaluation. Spring.
Prerequisites: PSE 300, FCH 223 or PSE 223. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 350 and PSE 550.

PSE 351 Pulping and Bleaching Laboratory Skills (3)
One hour of lecture per week provides background and information necessary for the three hours of laboratory per week. Students learn basic principles of chemical pulping and bleaching in a practical research format. Relative success in laboratory pulping and bleaching is determined by comparing results using over twenty standard test methods. Spring.
Pre- or co-requisites: FCH 223, FCH 360, FCH 380 with PSE 350 (concurrent registration).

PSE 361 Engineering Thermodynamics (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Principles of classical thermodynamics applied to engineering practice. First and second laws; heat effects; property functions and their correlation; physical and chemical equilibrium; solutions and mixtures; power and refrigeration cycles. Thermodynamic analysis of processes and systems via case studies and computer simulation. Spring.
Prerequisites: MAT 296, FCH 152, PHY 211. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 361 and ERE 561.

PSE 370 Principles of Mass and Energy Balance (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Conservation of mass and energy applied to steady-state and dynamic process units and systems. Problem analysis and solution; computational techniques. Thermodynamic data and their use; real vs. perfect gases; steam properties; psychrometry. Fall.
Pre- or co-requisite(s): PHY 211, MAT 296 (or concurrent), FCH 152.

PSE 371 Fluid Mechanics (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Fluid statics. Principles of mass, energy and momentum balance. Bernoulliís equation. Application to pipe flows, flow measurement and porous media. Movement of particles in fluid media. Rheology of fluids and suspensions typical in the pulp and paper industry (pulps, black liquor, etc.). Filtration and sedimentation of fibrous and particulate suspensions. Characteristics of pumps. Flow systems with economic considerations. Fall.
Prerequisites: PHY 211, FCH 152, MAT 296 or APM296. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 371 and PSE 571.

PSE 436 Pulp and Paper Unit Operations (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Applications of momentum, heat, and mass transfer to operations in the pulp and paper industry. Topics include pulp flow, heater and heat exchanger design, black liquor evaporation, humidification, steam systems, paper and pulp drying, gas absorption, pulp washing, leaching, and extraction. Laboratory exercises include paper drying, pulp washing and cleaning, heat exchanger operations, and gas absorption for liquor preparation. Spring.
Prerequisites: PSE 361, PSE 370, PSE 371, BPE 335.

PSE 437 Equipment Troubleshooting and Maintenance (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory and/or recitation discussions per week, plus literature study of assigned topics. Provides students with fundamental knowledge in troubleshooting and maintenance of industrial machines, processes and systems used in pulp and paper, bioprocess, and chemical engineering field. Spring and/or Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 437 and PSE 637.

PSE 438 Biorenewable fibrous and nonfibrous products (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Three credit-hour advanced science course through the topics in the production and properties of lignocellulosic products. Topics cover fibrous products including different paper grades, nanocellulose and cellulose derivatives, and nonfibrous products including products of enzymatic and/or chemical conversion of biomass constituents. Spring and/or Fall.
Prerequisite(s): PSE465 Fiber and Paper Properties and/or PSE237 Introduction to Lignocellulosics or consent of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 438 and PSE 638.

PSE 450 Pulping and Bleaching Processes (3)
Two hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week plus a critical review of recent literature on assigned topics including a technical write-up and presentation. Discussion of principle and fundamental chemistry in pulping and bleaching processes. Conducted experiments in pulping, bleaching and pulp evaluation. Spring.
Prerequisites: PSE 350. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 450 and PSE 650.

PSE 456 Management in the Paper Industry (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Provides the student with inter-active contact with active executives in the paper and allied industries. The student will develop and present studies of business cases in discussion forum to the class. An understanding of how general managers operate to manage an entire organization will be presented by visiting experts, class participation, group presentations, written papers and examinations. Spring.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 456 and PSE 656.

PSE 465 Fiber and Paper Properties (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Evaluation, study, and discussion of the physical, optical, and chemical properties of fibers, non-fibrous paper additives, and paper. The interrelationships between papermaking fibers, nonfibrous additives, and manufacturing methods, and their effects on the final quality of paper are discussed in correlation with different test methods. Fall or Spring.
Prerequisite: PSE202 Introduction to Papermaking

PSE 466 Paper Pigment and Barrier Coating (3)
Two hours of lecture per week. Discussion and study of surface sizing, various pigment coating formulations, and introduction to polymers used in barrier coating. Study of equipment used in coating operations, fundamental principles, and parameters which control their use and the effects on final paper properties. Spring or Fall.
Prerequisite: PSE465 Fiber and Paper Properties

PSE 467 Papermaking Wet End Chemistry (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Provides the student with the fundamental principles of colloid and surface chemistry as they relate to the interaction of papermaking materials and chemical additives in the wet end of a papermachine system. The topics of retention of fine solids and dewatering are addressed in detail. Application of the various topics presented during the course are made during a pilot papermachine trial. Spring.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both: PSE 467 and BPE 310.

PSE 468 Papermaking Processes (6)
One hour of lecture, six hours of laboratory per week. Laboratory study of the papermaking process, with emphasis on operation of the semi-commercial Fourdrinier paper machine. Emphasis is on the fundamentals of pulping, stock preparation, paper machine operation, evaluation of the finished product, and the collection and analysis of data to develop material and energy balances. Results of each paper machine run are evaluated in seminar-type discussions. Spring.
Prerequisites: PSE 300, PSE 370, PSE 465. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 468 and PSE 668.

PSE 469 Functional and Nano Additives (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory and/or recitation discussions per week, plus literature study of assigned topics. Provides the student with fundamental knowledge of structure, occurrence and preparation of mineral materials, the concepts of mineralogy -with an emphasis on carbonates, silicates (clay, talcum), titanium dioxide, sulphates, aluminum compounds, as well as pigments. The use of mineral materials in paper making applications. Consideration of ecological and economic aspects in relation to the mineral applications. Spring and/or Fall.
Pre- or co-requisites: PSE 465. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 469 and PSE 669.

PSE 477 Process Control (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Presents an introduction to the principles of process control. Linear analysis, LaPlace transforms, and nonlinear simulation are presented and applied to feedback, and feedforward control. Examples of process simulation, accuracy and stability of control are drawn from paper industry processes. Fall.
Prerequisite: APM 485 or equivalent. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 477 and PSE 677.

PSE 480 Engineering Design Economics (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Steps of process design, engineering economic analysis, estimation of capital investment, operating costs, profitability measures, evaluation of alternatives, inflation. Modeling and computer simulation of process units and systems; use of software. Design exercises and case studies. Spring.
Prerequisites: PSE 370, MAT 296.

PSE 481 Engineering Design (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Design-project procedure; data sources and development. Application of simulation and computer-aided design to process synthesis and plant layout. Formulation and solution of original design problems. Fall.
Prerequisites: PSE 371, PSE 372, PSE 480. Pre- or co-requisite: PBE 335.

PSE 492 Research Practice (3)
One hour of lecture per week and six hours of laboratory and/or recitation discussions, plus literature study of assigned topics, with emphasis on managing and executing a research project in the pulp and paper, bioprocess, chemical and environmental sector. Provides the student with in-depth knowledge of literature and patent search, correct research techniques, research planning, data gathering techniques and reporting. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 492 and PSE 792. Student needs to register for PSE 498 in Spring for research project execution.

PSE 496 Special Topics (1 - 3)
Lectures, conferences and discussions. Specialized topics in chemistry, chemical engineering and physics as well as topics pertaining to management as related to the pulp, paper, paperboard and allied industries. Fall and Spring.

PSE 498 Research Problem (1 - 4)
The student is assigned a research problem in pulping, bleaching, refining, additives, quality control of paper or paper products, or chemical engineering. The student must make a systematic survey of available literature on the assigned problem. Emphasis is on application of correct research technique rather than on the results of commercial importance. The information obtained from the literature survey, along with the data developed as a result of the investigation, is to be presented as a technical report. Fall, Spring and Summer.

PSE 550 Fiber Processing (3)
Two hour of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Discussion of the principles and fundamental chemistry applied in chemical pulping, chemical bleaching, and deinking processes. Transport and physical operations involved in fiber dispersion, washing, screening and refining. Conduct experiments in chemical pulping, chemical bleaching, de-inking, fiber refining and pulp evaluation. Spring.
Prerequisites: Graduate student standing or consent of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 350 and PSE 550.

PSE 552 Fiber Materials Recycling and Processing (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory and/or recitation discussions per week, plus literature study of assigned topics. Topics include advanced process operation and calculations for deinking, dispersion, washing, cleaning and bleaching of recycled fiber raw materials including related chemistry used in the paper processing industry. Spring and or Fall.

PSE 570 Principles of Mass and Energy Balances (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Conservation of mass and energy applied to steady-state and dynamic process units and systems. Problem analysis and solution; computational techniques. Thermodynamic data and their use; real vs. perfect gases; steam properties; psychrometry. Computer simulation of steady and non-steady state process systems. Fall.
Prerequisites: Physics, Calculus, and General Chemistry. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 370 and PSE 570.

PSE 571 Fluid Mechanics (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Fluid statics. Principles of mass, energy and momentum balance. Bernoulliís equation. Application to pipe flows, flow measurement and porous media. Movement of particles in fluid media. Rheology of fluids and suspensions typical in the pulp and paper industry (pulps, black liquor, etc.) Filtration and sedimentation of fibrous and particulate suspensions. Characteristics of pumps. Flow systems with economic considerations. Analysis of some papermaking operations such as drainage, dewatering, vacuum dewatering and wet pressing. Fall.
Prerequisites: Physics, Chemistry, Calculus. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 371 and PSE 571.

PSE 596 Special Topics (1 - 3)
Lectures, conferences, discussions and laboratory. Topics in environmental and resource engineering not covered in established courses. Designed for the beginning graduate student or selected upper-division undergraduate. Fall and/or Spring.

PSE 637 Equipment Troubleshooting and Maintenance (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory and/or recitation discussions per week, plus literature study of assigned topics. Provides students with fundamental knowledge in troubleshooting and maintenance of industrial machines, processes and systems used in pulp and paper, bioprocess, and chemical engineering field. Spring and/or Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 437 and PSE 637.

PSE 638 Biorenewable Fibrous and Nonfibrous Products (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Three credit-hour advanced science course through the topics in the production and properties of biorenewable products for graduate students. Topics include fibrous products such as different paper grades; printing and writing paper, paper board, tissue, and specialty papers, and nanocellulose and cellulose derivatives and nonfibrous products such as hemicelluloses, lignin, pectins, extractives and products of enzymatic and chemical conversion of carbohydrates. Independent academic research component required. Spring and/or Fall.
Prerequisite(s): PSE 465 Fiber and paper Properties and/or, PSE 223 Introduction to Lignocellulosics or consent of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 438 and PSE 638.

PSE 650 Pulping and Bleaching Processes (3)
Two hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week plus a critical review of recent literature on assigned topics including a technical write-up and presentation. Discussion of principle and fundamental chemistry in pulping and bleaching processes. Conducted experiments in pulping, bleaching and pulp evaluation. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): Organic, physical and analytic chemistry. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 450 and PSE 650.

PSE 656 Management in the Paper Industry (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Provides the student with interactive contact with active executives in the paper and allied industries. The student will develop and present studies of business cases in discussion forum to the class. An understanding of how general managers operate to manage an entire organization will be presented by visiting experts, class participation, group presentations, written papers, and examinations. The student will critically review selected literature and present their findings. Spring.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 456 and PSE 656.

PSE 665 Fiber and Paper Properties (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Advanced science course in evaluation, study, and discussion of the physical, optical, and chemical properties of fibers, non-fibrous paper additives, and paper. The interrelationships between fibers and nonfibrous paper additives, and manufacturing methods, and their effects on the final paper quality of paper are discussed. Independent academic research required. Spring and/or Fall.
Prerequisite: PSE 202 Introduction to Papermaking. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 465 and PSE 665.

PSE 666 Paper Pigment and Barrier Coating (3)
Two hours of lecture per week. Advanced course in materials and processes used in surface sizing, pigment coating, and barrier coating for graduate students. Study of equipment used in coating operations, fundamentals and parameters, which control their use and effects on final paper properties. Independent literature research with report and presentation on a selected topic. Spring and/or Fall.
Prerequisite: PSE 465 Fiber and Paper Properties. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 466 and PSE 666.

PSE 667 Colloidal and Interface Science Applications in Papermaking (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Provides the student with the fundamental principles of Colloidal and Interface Science as it relates to the interaction of papermaking materials and chemical additives in the wet end of a paper machine system. The topics of retention of fine solids and dewatering are addressed in detail. Spring.
Pre- or co-requisite: Physical chemistry.

PSE 668 Papermaking Processes (6)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Study of the papermaking process from theoretical and practical standpoints featuring the operation of the pilot paper machines. Emphasis is on the fundamentals of stock preparation and paper machine operations, papermaking process and product design, evaluation of the finished product, and the collection and analysis of process data. An independent project is required in conjunction with the undergraduate paper machine runs. Spring.
Pre- or co-requisite(s): PSE 300, PSE 370, PSE 665. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 468 and PSE 668.

PSE 669 Functional and Nano Additives (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory and/or recitation discussions per week, plus literature study of assigned topics. Provides the student with fundamental knowledge of structure, occurrence and preparation of mineral materials, the concepts of mineralogy -with an emphasis on carbonates, silicates (clay, talcum), titanium dioxide, sulphates, aluminum compounds, as well as pigments. The use of mineral materials in paper making applications. Consideration of ecological and economic aspects in relation to the mineral applications. Spring and/or Fall.
Pre- or co-requisites: PSE465 Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 469 and PSE 669.

PSE 677 Process Control (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Presents an introduction to the principles of process control. Linear analysis, LaPlace transforms, and nonlinear simulation are presented and applied to feedback, and feedforward control. Examples of process simulation, accuracy and stability of control are drawn from paper industry processes. Process identification using numerical techniques and MATLAB. Fall.
Prerequisite: Differential Equations. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 477 and PSE 677.

PSE 792 Research Practice (3)
One hour of lecture per week and six hours of laboratory and/or recitation discussions, plus literature study of assigned topics. with emphasis on managing and executing a research project in the pulp and paper, bioprocess, chemical and environmental sector. Provides the student with in depth knowledge of literature and patent search, correct research techniques, research planning, data gathering techniques and reporting. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 492 and PSE 792. Student needs to register for PSE 798 in Spring for research project execution.

PSE 796 Advanced Topics (1 - 3)
Lectures, conferences, discussions and laboratory. Advanced topics in forest engineering, paper science and engineering, and wood products engineering. Fall and/or Spring.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSE 797 Seminar (1 - 3)
Discussion of assigned topics in the fields related to Paper Science Engineering. Spring and Fall.

PSE 798 Research in Paper Science Engineering (1 - 12)
Independent research topics in Paper Science Engineering. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

PSE 898 Professional Experience/Synthesis (1 - 6)
A supervised, documented professional work experience in the Master of Professional Studies degree program. Fall, Spring, or Summer.
Pre- or co-requisite(s): Approval of proposed study plan by advisor, Faculty, and any sponsoring organization.

PSE 899 Master's Thesis Research (1 - 12)
Research and independent study for the master's thesis. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

PSE 999 Doctoral Thesis Research (1 - 12)
Research and independent study for the doctoral dissertation. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

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BPE

BPE 132 Orientation Seminar: Bioprocess Engineering (1)
One hour lecture per week or three-hour lab/field trip per week. Introduction to campus resources available to ensure academic success. Introduction to bioprocess engineering as a field of inquiry and career path. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 132 and PSE 132.

BPE 230 China Experience (3)
Forty five hours (equivalent) of lecture and field studies. General survey of the history of China from ancient societies through the current time, with attention to cultural, ecological and natural resource issues focused on selected localities of China. The locality and/or hot spots will be selected from: the invention of paper; printing technology; renewable energy; anaerobic digesion of manual / plant biomass; wastewater treatment; Great Walls; Forbidden City; Three Gorges area; Canals; Chinese gardens; Sichuan; Dujianyang Irrigation Dam/Channels; Panda preservation; Hakka culture; Tibetan culture; plants and vegetation, etc. Analysis of the evolution of the Chinese culture. Historical and contemporary influences of China. Spring, Fall or Summer.

BPE 296 Special Topics in Engineering (1 - 3)
Provides experimental, interdisciplinary, or special coursework at the freshman and sophomore levels within the field of environmental resources engineering. Subject matter and course format vary from semester to semester and section to section. Fall and Spring.

BPE 300 Introduction to Industrial Bioprocessing (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussions. Industrial examples of biotechnology and bioprocessing will be reviewed. Topics include applications of biotechnology and bioprocessing to the food, water and wastewater treatment, industrial biotechnology, biopharmaceutical, biochemical and biofuel industries. Through case studies of process flow sheets for different products students will develop an understanding of unit operations typically utilized in bioprocessing manufacturing operations. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): EFB 103 and EFB 104; co-requisite(s): FCH 221 and FCH 222.

BPE 304 Summer Internship in Bioprocess Engineering (2)
Twelve weeks full time bioprocessing employment approved by the Department between the junior and senior years. The student must submit a comprehensive report and give a presentation to fulfill this requirement. Summer.
Prerequisite: PSE 370 or equivalent.

BPE 305 Co-op Experience in Bioprocess Engineering (2)
One semester full-time bioprocessing experience as an engineering intern on company-assigned projects. Typically, the student works for a semester and adjacent summer also taking BPE 304. The student must submit a comprehensive report and give a presentation to fulfill this requirement. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite: PSE 370 or equivalent.

BPE 310 Colloid and Interface Science (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. This course will cover the basic principles of colloidal and interfacial science as applied to bioprocesses. It will provide a foundation and theoretical understanding that will be applied in bioseparations, transport phenomena, biochemical/bioprocess engineering and other advanced courses in the bioprocess engineering curriculum. Fall.
Prerequisites: PSE 370, PSE 361, FCH 150, FCH 152. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 310 and PSE 467.

BPE 335 Transport Phenomena (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Principles of heat and mass transfer as applied to the bioprocess industries. Topics include conduction, convective heat and mass transfer, diffusion of both steady-state and transient situations, analogies for heat and mass transfer, boundary layers, porous media transport, heat and mass transfer analyses. Discussion of specific bioprocess examples. Spring.
Prerequisites: PSE 370, PSE 371. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 335 and ERE 534.

BPE 336 Transport Phenomena Laboratory (1)
Three hours of laboratory per week. Introduction to report writing and laboratory safety. Experiments on fluid mechanics, heat transfer, diffusion, and convective mass transfer as applied to the bioprocess industries. Data analysis and data presentation in oral and written form are required. Spring.
Prerequisites: PSE 370 and PSE 371 or equivalents. Co-requisite: BPE 335 (or prerequisite).

BPE 420 Bioseparations (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Major unit operations used for the separation, purification and recovery of products from complex mixtures. Separation processes including sedimentation, filtration, centrifugation, membrane ultra-filtration, nanofiltration, ion exchange processes, chromatographic separations. Fall.
Prerequisite: BPE 310. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 420 and BPE 620.

BPE 421 Bioprocess Kinetics and Systems Engineering (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Topics in biochemical kinetics and reaction engineering are discussed including their application to microbiological systems used for bioprocessing. Batch and continuous biochemical reactor designs. The role of agitation in gas and solids delivery and heat removal for inclusion in design decisions. Impact of engineering parameters and design decisions on operability and economics. Fall.
Prerequisite: BPE 335. Co-requisite: BPE 420. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 421 and BPE 621.

BPE 435 Unit Process Operations (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory and/or recitation, discussions per week. Topics include packed towers, tray columns, fluidized bed, fluid mechanic limitations, pressure drop, mass transfer coefficient, mass transfer limits, thermodynamic limits, equilibrium stage calculations, packed tower and tray column design and performance analysis. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): BPE 335/336.

BPE 438 Introduction to Biorefinery Processes (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussions per week. Topics covered include chemical and physical properties of biomass feedstocks; sustainable biomass production/utilization, chemical and biological processes of converting plant biomass to chemicals, liquid fuels, and materials. Focus on green chemistry and/or environmentally benign processes, with some discussions on political and social aspects of sustainability and renewability. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): Cell biology and BPE 335 Transport Phenomena. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 438 and BPE 638.

BPE 440 Bioprocess and Systems Laboratory (3)
One hour of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. Measurement and analysis of bioprocess systems, including steady-state and dynamic modeling of systems. Investigation of various bioprocesses including fermentation, enzymatic reactions, and reactive processes involving lignocellulosic materials. Spring.
Prerequisite: BPE 420 and BPE 421.

BPE 441 Biomass Energy (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Historical, current and future uses of biomass as a source of renewable energy for the production of bioenergy, biofuels and bioproducts. Characteristics of biomass, their conversion to different forms of energy and end products, and an assessment of their sustainability. Spring.
Prerequisite: ESC 325, ESC 335 or permission of instructor; one semester of freshman chemistry or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 441 and BPE 641.

BPE 481 Bioprocess Engineering Design (3)
2.5 hours of lecture and 1.5 hours of studio per week. Design project and procedure; open-ended design options; mass/energy balances; unit operations; safety considerations; and economic analysis. Process simulation and computer-aided design for process synthesis and plant layout. Formulation and solution of original design problem(s) under realistic (e.g., socioeconomic, process, environmental, safety) constraints. Spring.
Prerequisites: PSE 480, BPE 420, BPE 421, BPE 435, or equivalents. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 481 and BPE 681.

BPE 496 Special Topics (1 - 3)
Lectures, readings, problems and discussions. Topics in environmental or resource engineering as announced. Fall and/or Spring.

BPE 498 Research Problem in Bioprocess Engineering (1 - 4)
Independent study. The student is assigned a research problem in bioprocess engineering. The student must make a systematic survey of available literature on the assigned problem. Emphasis is on application of correct research techniques rather than on discovery of results of commercial importance. The information obtained in the literature survey, along with the data developed as a result of the investigation, is to be presented as a technical report. Fall, Spring, and Summer.

BPE 501 Bioprocess Microbiology (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory/discussion per week. Topics include general microbiology, enzymology, enzyme kinetics, biochemistry, metabolic regulation, microbial growth and product formation (with general stoichiometry), media formulation and bioprocess design including batch, fed-batch, and continuous modes, techniques for product recovery and purification, and mammalian cell lines/culture. Microbiological growth media, batching, and the operation of bench-top bioreactors and various analytical instrumentation. Fall.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; basic understanding of chemistry and biology; appropriate quantitative skills.

BPE 503 Bioprocess Plant Design (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Topics covered include integration of process and support systems and equipment; concepts of facility design integrating Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), equipment and systems cleanability, people flow, product protection, capital investment, and operating costs. This course will focus towards facility design in the bioprocess industry. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): BPE 620, BPE 621

BPE 510 Introduction to Polymer Coatings (3)
Fundamental science of polymerization and film formation for a wide class of organic coatings, including acrylics, latexes, polyesters, amino resins, epoxies, alkyds, and silicon derivatives as well as the integration of appropriate binders and additives affecting coating quality. Reaction chemistries and their distinguishing characteristics for several cross-linking agents. Reaction kinetics are considered with emphasis on the influence of conditions during synthesis. Various organic coatings are compared based on desired mechanical and optical properties along with specific applications. The nature of defects and the resulting effect on product lifetime of coatings are examined. Online Academic Year and/or Summer Session.
Prerequisite(s): B.S. from an accredited institution with at least one semester of organic chemistry or permission of instructor.

BPE 511 Radiation Curing Equipment, Instrumentation and Safety (3)
Technologies used for commercial radiation curing for energy-efficient and environmentally-responsible curing of resins, inks, coatings and adhesives pertinent to industry chemists, engineers, technicians, and managers. Ultra violet light (UV), electron beam (EB), radio frequency (RF) and Infrared (IR) generating systems, along with ancillary equipment used to quantify energy deposition. Basic equipment functions, interaction of radiation sources with specific substrates and chemistries, benefits and drawbacks of each technology, and safety and handling considerations. Emphasis is placed on effectively selecting and justifying equipment appropriate for specific applications. Online Academic Year and/or Summer Session.
Prerequisite(s): B.S. from an accredited institution with at least one semester of organic chemistry or permission of instructor.

BPE 535 Transport Phenomena (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Principles of heat and mass transfer as applied to the bioprocess industries. Topics include conduction, convective heat and mass transfer, diffusion of both steady-state and transient situations, analogies for heat and mass transfer, boundary layers, porous media transport, heat and mass transfer analysis. Discussion of specific bioprocess examples. Spring.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 335 and BPE 535.

BPE 536 Radiation Curing of Polymer Technologies (3)
Broad treatment of development and use of radiation curing of polymer technologies as they apply to industry-related roles such as chemists, engineers, technicians, and managers. Properties and development of free-radical and cationic systems initiated by various radiation sources. Chemical and physical underpinnings of common radiation curable materials and mechanisms. Analysis techniques that monitor the cure reaction and the properties of cured material. Emphasis on the considerations and challenges in common applications of radiation curable polymer systems and associated costs, regulatory, and safety considerations. Online Academic Year and/or Summer Session.
Prerequisite(s): B.S. from an accredited institution with at least one semester of organic chemistry or permission of instructor.

BPE 596 Special Topics (1 - 3)
Lectures, conferences, discussions and laboratory. Topics in environmental and resource engineering not covered in established courses. Designed for the beginning graduate student or selected upper-division undergraduate. Fall and/or Spring.

BPE 620 Bioseparations (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Cell disruption, solid liquid separations, centrifugation, chromatographic techniques (gel filtration, affinity, ion exchange), and membrane processes. Extraction. Crystallization and drying. Aseptic filtration. Fall.
Prerequisite: BPE 501. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 620 and BPE 420.

BPE 621 Bioreaction Engineering (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Bioprocess kinetics, reaction engineering, mass and energy balances, stoichiometry, enzyme kinetics, growth and product synthesis kinetics, mass transfer effects, bioreactor analysis and design, instrumentation and control, batch processing, bioreactor scale-up, agitation, oxygen delivery, heat removal and kinetics of sterilization (clean and sterilization in place (CIP and SIP). Spring.
Prerequisites: Mass and Heat Transfer, or Transport Phenomena. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 621 and PBE 421.

BPE 635 Unit Process Operations (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory and/or recitation, discussions. Topics include packed towers, tray columns, fluidized bed, fluid mechanic limitations, pressure drop, mass transfer coefficient, mass transfer limits, thermodynamic limits, equilibrium stage calculations, packed tower and tray column design and performance analysis. Fall.

BPE 638 Introduction to Biorefinery Processes (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussions per week. Topics covered include chemical and physical properties of biomass feedstocks; sustainable biomass production/utilization, chemical and biological processes of converting plant biomass to chemicals, liquid fuels, and materials. Focus on green chemistry and/or environmentally benign processes, with some discussions on political and social aspects of sustainability and renewability. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 438 and BPE 638.

BPE 640 Bioprocess Kinetics Experiments and Data Analysis (3)
One hour of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. Planing and execution of laboratory exercises. Measurement and analysis of adsorption, chemical and biological transformations,including batch and/or continuous systems. Adsorption and chemical transformation or catalytic reactions may include solid catalyst(s), acid catalyst(s), base catalysts(s) or other agents. Biological transformtaion may include enzyme, bacteria, fungi or yeast. Bioprocess kinetics and mass transfer effects. Coaching fellow students on experimental procedures and safety requirements. Parametric analysis. Report writing and seminar presentation. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 440 and BPE 640.

BPE 641 Biomass Energy (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Historical, current and future uses of biomass as a source of renewable energy for the production of bioenergy, biofuels and bioproducts. Characteristics of biomass, their conversion to different forms of energy and end products and an assessment of their sustainability. Spring.
Prerequisite: ESC 525, ESC 535 or permission of instructor; one semester of freshman chemistry or permission of instructor.

BPE 681 Bioprocess Plant Design (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Topics covered include integration of process and support systems and equipment; concepts of facility design integrating Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), equipment and systems cleanability, people flow, product protection, capital investment, and operating costs. This course will focus towards facility design in the biopharmaceutical industry. Spring.
Prerequisites: BPE 620, BPE 621 or equivalents.

BPE 796 Advanced Topics (1 - 3)
Lectures, conferences, discussions and laboratory. Advanced topics in forest engineering, paper science and engineering, and wood products engineering. Fall and/or Spring.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BPE 797 Seminar (1 - 3)
Discussion of assigned topics in the fields related to Bioprocess Engineering. Spring and Fall.

BPE 798 Research in Bioprocess Engineering (1 - 12)
Independent research topics in Bioprocess Engineering. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

BPE 898 Professional Experience/Synthesis (1 - 6)
A supervised, documented professional work experience in the Master of Professional Studies degree program. Fall, Spring, or Summer.
Pre- or co-requisite(s): Approval of proposed study plan by advisor, Faculty, and any sponsoring organization.

BPE 899 Master's Thesis Research (1 - 12)
Research and independent study for the master's thesis. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

BPE 999 Doctoral Thesis Research (1 - 12)
Research and independent study for the doctoral dissertation. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

TOP

ERE

ERE 132 Orientation Seminar: Environmental Resources Engineering (1)
One hour of lecture, discussion and/or exercises per week. Introduction to department and campus resources available to ensure academic success for Environmental Resources Engineering majors. Introduction to engineering as a design profession. Fall.

ERE 133 Introduction to Engineering Design (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of group instruction per week. An introduction to the engineering profession, including design, communication, ethical and professional behavior, teamwork and data analysis. Learning is reinforced through study, conduct and critique of design exercises related to environmental resources engineering. Spring.

ERE 275 Ecological Engineering I (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of group instruction per week. Overview of ecological engineering theory and practice. Key concepts, empirical models, and case studies of ecological engineering. Living machines, treatment wetlands, bioremediation, municipal composting, agroforestry, traditional ecological knowledge, emergy analysis, and ecosystem restoration. Spring.
Prerequisites: one semester each of calculus, biology, chemistry, and ecology. Forest Engineering students only or by permission of instructor.

ERE 311 Ecological Engineering in the Tropics (3)
One hour of discussion per week with intensive spring break field study in a Caribbean country. Principles of ecological engineering for ecosystem restoration and pollution control. Field trips to pristine and degraded ecosystems including: humid tropical cloud forests, coastal mangrove, dry mountain forests, and coral reefs to identify target functions for nature and society, observe degradations, and develop sustainable restoration designs. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): one course in calculus, biology, and chemistry. Note: Credit will not be granted for both ERE 311 and ERE 511.

ERE 335 Numerical and Computing Methods (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introduction to numerical and computing methods for engineers. Writing computer code to analyze and solve engineering problems using state-of-the-art software packages. Fall.
Prerequisite: MAT 485.

ERE 339 Fluid Mechanics (4)
Three hours of lecture per week plus one lab session. An introduction to fluid mechanics within the context of civil and environmental engineering. This includes hydrostatics, Bernoulliís Equation, control volume analysis, drag, dynamic similitude, pipe flow, and open channel flow with some brief coverage of hydraulic machines and flow in porous media. Fall.
Prerequisites: APM206 and GNE172 or equivalents

ERE 340 Engineering Hydrology and Hydraulics (4)
Three hours of lecture and lab per week. Covers hydraulics processes of pipe network flow, open-channel flow, river flow controls, and porous media flow. Covers hydrologic controls and measurement of watershed processes including rainfall, evapotranspiration, infiltration, and runoff. ERE 540 covers greater theory and application through problem sets and project reports than ERE 340.
Prerequisites: ERE 335, ERE 339 and ERE 371 Note: Credit will not be granted for both ERE 340 and ERE 540

ERE 351 Basic Engineering Thermodynamics (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Principles of energy conservation and conversion: first and second laws. Relation to PVT behavior, property functions, equilibria and heat and mass transfer, and applications to energy and power systems. Introduction to engineering problem analysis and computer methods. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): Physics, general chemistry, and calculus.

ERE 365 Principles of Remote Sensing (4)
Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory and discussion per week. A qualitative and quantitative introduction to the fundamentals of acquiring, analyzing and utilizing remote sensing data. Introductory concepts and methods in digital image processing and photogrammetry. Spring.
Prerequisite: ERE 371 Surveying for Engineers. Note: Credit will not be granted for both ERE 365 and ERE 565.

ERE 371 Surveying for Engineers (4)
Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. The principles of plane surveying and position determination for engineers. Subject matter areas include introduction to the theory of measurement and errors, reference surfaces, coordinate systems and datums, horizontal and vertical measurements, traversing and computations, construction surveying including circular and parabolic curves, property and public land surveys, the analysis and treatment of systematic and random errors, foundations and applications of global positioning systems. Laboratory fieldwork and computations culminate in a topographic map. Fall.
Prerequisite: Calculus.

ERE 385 Mechanical Design (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. The principles of operation and design of mechanical systems common in engineering. Solution of equipment design using such components as springs, gears, motors and transmissions. Strength, reliability and economy are considered. Design projects are oriented to current concerns in construction, environment, and manufacturing. Spring.
Prerequisite: ERE 221; Co-requisites: ERE 222, ERE 362.

ERE 405 Sustainable Engineering (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Will explore and attempt to develop solutions to societal and environmental problems in a changing world that is facing climate change, premium fuel depletion, and regional water shortages. Evaluation of system sustainability using a multidisciplinary framework. Introduction to sustainability metrics, including emergy evaluation and life cycle assessment. Application of emergy evaluation. Spring.

ERE 412 River Form and Process (3)
Three hours of lecture per week including river field sites. Field-based data collection methods for river classification. Bankfull flow estimates. Classified river form, suggested evolution sequences and governing fluvial processes. Computational river hydraulics, sediment transport, and issues of channel stability and restoration. Fall.
Prerequisites: ERE340, ERE371, APM395. Note: Credit will not be granted for both ERE 412 and ERE 612.

ERE 425 Ecosystem Restoration Design (3)
A summer field course followed by a weekly seminar and workshop during the Fall. Will travel in a less developed country. Will examine degraded and restored ecosystems. Will travel on public transportation and stay in low-cost hostels. Will use contemporary problems as source material for course projects. Continuation of restoration project designs and analysis from the field trip will be part of the coursework after returning to Syracuse. The course will explore restoration strategies in many different ecosystems. Will consider restoration needs in less developed countries, and how that shapes design and evaluation. Course fee. Fall.
Prerequisites: One course in calculus, biology, and chemistry, upper division standing, and permission of instructor

ERE 430 Engineering Decision Analysis (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Classical engineering economics: time value of money, nominal and effective interest, and present worth, annual worth, rate of return, and benefit-cost ratio comparison techniques. Identification and evaluation of alternative investment and borrowing decisions, including the role of inflation, depreciation, taxes and uncertainty. Investment theory including the potential risks and rewards associated with investments options. Simulation and optimization techniques to aid in management decisions. Fall.

ERE 440 Water Pollution Engineering (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Two laboratory exercises and one field trip. Introduction to physical, chemical and biological parameters of water and wastewater quality as well as principles of unit operations and processes for wastewater treatment and reuse. Study of design parameters and design procedures for wastewater treatment and reuse. Spring.
Prerequisites: FCH 152 General Chemistry II; FCH 153 General Chemistry II Lab; EFB 101 General Biology I; ERE 275 Ecological Engineering Co-requisite: APM 485 Differential Equations

ERE 444 Hydro-Meteorology (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Atmospheric physics, moisture dynamics, and thermodynamics emphasizing feedback loops with precipitation. Quantitative descriptions of stability and dynamics and the development of fronts, cyclones, and thunderstorms. Weather station sensors and data-logger programming. Testing of analysis products, numerical weather models, quantitative precipitation forecasts, and radar precipitation data. Spring.
Prerequisites: Physics 1, Calculus II, permission of instructor.

ERE 445 Hydrologic Modeling (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. An exploration of deterministic and stochastic hydrologic models, model development, and the use of computer programming to construct, calibrate, manipulate, and interpret hydrologic models. Theoretical and analytical approaches to describing hydrologic processes, including precipitation, evapotranspiration, infiltration, surface runoff, percolation, and groundwater discharge. Stochastic techniques include frequency, trend, and regression analyses. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): Introductory computer programming, Probability and Statistics, one year of Calculus. Note: Credit will not be granted for both ERE 445 and ERE 645.

ERE 448 Open Channel Hydraulics (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Advanced concepts in open channel hydraulics, including the energy and momentum principles, critical flow, uniform flow, flow profiles, and unsteady flow used suitable for engineering practice. Spring.
Prerequisite: FEG 340 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both ERE 448 and ERE 548.

ERE 450 Environmental Hydraulics (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Theories of open channel flows and dynamics. Hydraulic physical and computational models. Turbulent processes, advection and dispersion components of mixing. Physical and numerical analysis of unsteady flows. Interactions of channel hydraulics with sediment and air interfaces regulating ecosystem functions. Spring.
Prerequisites: FEG133, MAE341, FEG335, FEG340, ERE371, APM 395.

ERE 465 Environmental Systems Engineering (3)
Mathematical models of environmental systems are presented and combined with optimization procedures, decision theory, uncertainty analysis, and engineering economics to develop integrated approaches to the planning, design, and sustainable management of complex environmental systems. Students will be exposed to a variety of optimization algorithms for a wide range of environmental applications. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): APM206 Corequisity(s): APM395

ERE 468 Solid Waste Management (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Introduction to solid waste regulations, social economic, environmental and technical factors. Design of solid waste management systems, including collection, recycling, composting, energy recovery, land disposal, leachate treatment, and stormwater control. Field trips. Fall.
Prerequisites: chemistry, biology, soil science, engineering hydrology.

ERE 475 Ecological Engineering for Water Quality (3)
Three hours of lecture/seminar/discussion per week. Design and analysis of ecological treatment systems for water quality improvement. Hands-on construction, operation and/or monitoring of engineered ecosystems through group project activities beyond class meeting times in on-campus labs and a greenhouse. Focusing on constructed wetlands, with minor topics selected by students. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): ERE 440/643 or equivalent. Note: Credit will not be granted for both ERE 675 and ERE 475.

ERE 485 Fundamentals of Engineering Preparation (1)
Discussion of content and administation of the Fundamentals of Engineeering (FE) Exam, a comprehensive review of FE-type problems, and a targeted review of specific topics on the FE Exam. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or consent of instructor.

ERE 488 Engineering Project Management (1)
Project management strategies for the engineering profession. Readings, exercises and discussion emphasizing professional responsibility and ethical practices; project management; technical communication and teamwork. Team-based scoping and planning of engineering design projects. Fall.
Prerequisite: Senior status ERE students only.

ERE 489 Environmental Resources Engineering Planning and Design (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory. A capstone course to integrate engineering coursework with the engineering design process to solve interdisciplinary environmental problems. Semester-long project provides experience in problem analysis, teamwork, project management, engineering ethics, and professional communication. Spring.
Prerequisites: Senior standing in Environmental Resources Engineering, ERE 488

ERE 496 Special Topics (1 - 3)
Lectures, readings, problems and discussions. Topics in environmental or resource engineering as announced. Fall and/or Spring.

ERE 498 Research Problem in Environmental Resources Engineering (1 - 3)
Independent research in topics in environmental resources engineering for the highly motivated undergraduate student. Selection of subject area determined by the student in conference with appropriate faculty member. Tutorial conferences, discussions and critiques scheduled as necessary. Fall, Spring.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ERE 506 Hazardous Waste Management (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Systematic control of generation, storage, transport, treatment and disposal of hazardous waste. Applicable hazardous waste regulations. Pollutant transport mechanisms. Technology design to investigate, control emissions and remediate sites. Urban economic redevelopment impacts. Fall.
Pre- or co-requisite(s): Chemistry and biology. Permission of instructor for seniors in good standing.

ERE 511 Ecological Engineering in the Tropics (3)
One hour of discussion per week with intensive spring break field study in a Caribbean country. Principles of ecological engineering for ecosystem restoration and pollution control. Field trips to pristine and degraded ecosystems including: humid tropical cloud forests, coastal mangrove, dry mountain forests, and coral reefs to identify target functions for nature and society, observe degradations, and develop sustainable restoration designs. ERE 511 students will perform the additional work of writing a 15-page research paper. Spring.
Prerequisites: 1 course in calculus, biology, and chemistry. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FEG 311 and ERE 511.

ERE 519 Green Entrepreneurship (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Explore challenges and goals of creating a start-up venture in environmental science or technology. Recognize trends in the marketplace, and where commercial opportunities can be created. Analyze feasibility and potential to create a sustainable venture. Other topic areas include critical success factors and key start-up issues unique to science and technology firms. Spring.
Pre- or Co-requisites: FOR 207 Introduction to Economics or equivalent; or permission of instructor.

ERE 527 Stormwater Management (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. One Saturday field trip. Techniques for urban stormwater and erosion control and analysis of associated water quality impacts. Review of applicable regulations and design standards. Students will engage in individual and team-oriented activities such as lecture, discussion, observation, computation, reading and writing. In addition, students are required to participate in a Saturday field trip where examples of stormwater management facilities will be reviewed. Students will, in small teams, generate a design for a stormwater management alternative at a local site. Fall.
Prerequisite: FEG 340 or equivalent as determined by instructor.

ERE 530 Numerical and Computing Methods (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Programming skills and computing techniques using state-of-the-art software packages. Applications of programming and computing methods for solving geospatial, ecological, and/or water resource engineering problems. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): Differential Equations.

ERE 534 Transport Phenomena (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Principles of heat and mass transfer as applied to the bioprocess industries. Topics include conduction, convective heat and mass transfer, diffusion of both steady-state and transient situations, analogies for heat and mass transfer, boundary layers, porous media transport, heat and mass transfer analysis. Discussion of specific bioprocess examples. Spring.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 335 and ERE 534.

ERE 540 Engineering Hydrology and Hydraulics (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Covers hydraulics processes of pipe network flow, open-channel flow,river flow controls, and porous media flow. Covers hydrologic controls and measurement of watershed processes including rainfall, evapotranspiration, infiltration, and runoff. ERE 540 covers greater theory and application through problem sets and project reports than ERE 340.
Prerequisites: ERE 335, ERE 339 and ERE 371. Note: Credit will not be granted for both ERE 340 and ERE 540

ERE 545 Environmental Soil Physics (3)
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab per week. Soil water content and potential, steady water flow in saturated soil, heat flow in soil, transient water flow. Field methods to obtain data for analysis and modeling. Application of analytical and numerical solutions to describe heat and water fluxes in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum, unsaturated zone hydrology, and solute transport. Fall.
Prerequisite: PHY 211, APM 485, ERE 339, or equivalent

ERE 548 Open Channel Hydraulics (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Advanced concepts in open channel hydraulics, including the energy and momentum principles, critical flow, uniform flow, flow profiles, and unsteady flow used suitable for engineering practice. Spring.
Pre-requisites: ERE 340 or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both ERE 448 and ERE 548.

ERE 551 GIS for Engineers (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Introduction to fundamental concepts in geographic information systems (GISs) with a focus on engineering applications. Fundamental concepts and development of geographic information systems including models and georeferencing systems used to represent and characterize spatial data. Data processing including collection and preprocessing, data management, spatial analysis and manipulation, and data output. Necessity and utility of spatial data in engineering design analysis. Fall.
Prerequisite: Calculus. Co-requisite: ERE 371 or equivalent.

ERE 553 Introduction to Spatial Information (1)
Three hours of lecture per week for the first third of the semester. An introduction to spatial terminology and methods for determining and expressing position. Examination of accuracy and precision in the context of horizontal measurements. Issues with subsequent use of measurements for producing maps and performing analysis. Fall.

ERE 561 Engineering Thermodynamics (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Principles of classical thermodynamics applied to engineering practice. First and second laws; heat effects; property functions and their correlation; physical and chemical equilibrium; solutions and mixtures; equations of state. Compressible flow. Electrolyte solutions. Thermodynamic analysis of processes and systems via case studies and computer simulation. Compressible flow and /or thermodynamics of electrolyte solutions. Fall.
Prerequisites: Physics and Calculus. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 361 and PSE 561.

ERE 565 Principles of Remote Sensing (4)
Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory and discussion per week. A qualitative and quantitative introduction to the fundamentals of acquiring, analyzing and utilizing remote sensing data. Introductory concepts and methods in digital image processing and photogrammetry. Spring.
Prerequisite: ERE 371 Surveying for Engineers or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FEG 365 and ERE 565.

ERE 566 Introduction to Global Positioning Systems (1)
Three hours of lecture per week for the last third of the semester. An introduction to the theory and practice of performing global positioning system (GPS) measurements. Comparison of accuracy potential for different GPS equipment and techniques. Exploration of error sources that reduce the accuracy of GPS measurements. Collection of GPS data. Fall.

ERE 605 Sustainable Engineering (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introduction to sustainability metrics,nsuch as emergy evaluation and life cycle assessment. application of emergy evaluation. Explore and evaluate potential solutions to societal and environmental problems in a changing world that is facing climate change, premium fuel depletion, and regional water shortages. Evaluation of system sustainability using a multidisciplinary framework. Spring.
Prerequisites: Ecological engineering or permission of instructor

ERE 612 River Form and Process (3)
Three hours of lecture per week including river field sites. Field-based data collection methods for river classification. Bankfull flow estimates. Classified river form, suggested evolution sequences and governing fluvial processes. Computational river hydraulics, sediment transport, and issues of channel stability and restoration. Fall.
Prerequisites: Engineering Hydrology and Hydraulics, Engineering Probability and Statistics. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FEG 412 and ERE 612.

ERE 621 Spatial Analysis (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Spatial statistics and modeling as applied to various data formats: single point data, continuous data and area data. First and second order effects, complete spatial randomness, tessellation, kernel, covariograms and variograms, kriging, distance measures, correlation/correlogram. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): APM391, FEG335 or permission of instructor.

ERE 622 Digital Image Analysis (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Elements of digital image processing and analysis systems: Digital image representation, visual perception, sampling and quantization, pixel connectivity, Fourier transforms, image enhancement, filtering, image segmentation, edge detection, thresholding, representation schemes, descriptors, morphology, recognition and interpretation. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): APM391, FEG335 or permission of instructor.

ERE 625 Ecosystem Restoration Design (3)
A summer field course followed by a weekly seminar and workshop during the Fall. Will travel in a less developed country. Will examine degraded and restored ecosystems. Will travel on public transportation and stay in low-cost hostels. Will use contemporary problems as source material for course projects. Each student will work individually with the instructor to develop an approach to explore a novel research direction for ecosystem restoration. Continuation of restoration project designs and analysis from the field trip will be part of the coursework after returning to Syracuse. The course will explore restoration strategies in many different ecosystems. Will consider restoration needs in less developed countries, and how that shapes design and evaluation. Course fee. Fall.
Prerequisites: One course in calculus, biology, and chemistry, and permission of instructor

ERE 640 Water Pollution Engineering (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Two laboratory exercises, one field trip and group project. Introduction to physical, chemical and biological parameters of water and wastewater quality as well as principles of unit operations and processes for wastewater treatment and reuse. Study of the design parameters and design procedures for wastewater treatment and reuse. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): General chemistry, microbiology. Co-requisite: Differential equations. Note: Credit will not be granted for both ERE 440 and ERE 640.

ERE 641 Biomass Energy (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Historical, current and future uses of biomass as a source of renewable energy for the production of bioenergy, biofuels and bioproducts. Characteristics of biomass, their conversion to different forms of energy and end products and an assessment of their sustainability. Spring.
Prerequisite: ESC 525, ESC 535 or permission of instructor; one semester of freshman chemistry or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 441 and ERE 641.

ERE 643 Water Pollution Engineering (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Two laboratory exercises, one field trip and group project. Introduction to physical, chemical and biological parameters of water and wastewater quality as well as principles of unit operations and processes for wastewater treatment and reuse. Study of the design parameters and design procedures for wastewater treatment and reuse. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): General Chemistry, microbiology. Co-requisite: Differential equations. Note: Credit will not be granted for both ERE 440 and ERE 643.

ERE 644 Hydro-Meteorology (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Atmospheric physics, moisture dynamics, and thermodynamics emphasizing feedback loops with precipitation. Quantitative descriptions of stability and dynamics and the development of fronts, cyclones, and thunderstorms. Weather station sensors and data-logger programming. Testing of analysis products, numerical weather models, quantitative precipitation forecasts, and radar precipitation data. Spring. Prerequisites: Physics, Calculus II, permission of instructor
Prerequisites: Physics, Calculus II, permission of instructor.

ERE 645 Hydrologic Modeling (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. An exploration of deterministic and stochastic hydrologic models, model development, and the use of computer programming to construct, calibrate, manipulate, and interpret hydrologic models. Theoretical and analytical approaches to describing hydrologic processes, including precipitation, evapotranspiration, infiltration, surface runoff, percolation, and groundwater discharge. Stochastic techniques include frequency, trend, and regression analyses. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): Introductory computer programming, Probability and Statistics, 1 year of Calculus. Note: Credit will not be granted for both ERE 445 and ERE 645.

ERE 650 Environmental Hydraulics (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Theories of open channel flows and dynamics. Hydraulic physical and computational models. Turbulent processes, advection and dispersion components of mixing. Physical and numerical analysis of unsteady flows. Interactions of channel hydraulics with sediment and air interfaces regulating ecosystem functions. Spring.
Prerequisites: FEG133, MAE341, FEG335, FEG340, ERE371, APM 395, or equivalent.

ERE 665 Environmental Systems Engineering (3)
Mathematical models of environmental systems are presented and combined with optimization procedures, decision theory, uncertainty analysis, and engineering economics to develop integrated approaches to the planning, design, and sustainable management of complex environmental systems. Students will evaluate and present a variety of optimization algorithms for a wide range of environmental applications. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): APM206 Corequisity(s): APM395

ERE 674 Methods in Ecological Treatment Analysis (3)
Two hours of lecture/seminar/discussion and three hours of lab per week. Introduction to the components and design principles of engineered ecosystems for water quality improvement. Common lab exercises for a comprehensive analysis of an engineered ecosystem, including water quality, reaction kinetics, hydraulic characteristics, vegetation, soil and gravel, and microbial community. Discussion on experimental procedures and data analysis. Spring.

ERE 675 Ecological Engineering for Water Quality (3)
Three hours of lecture/seminar/discussion per week. Design and analysis of ecological treatment systems for water quality improvement. Hands-on construction, operation and/or monitoring of engineered ecosystems through group project activities beyond class meeting times in on-campus labs and a greenhouse. Focusing on constructed wetlands, with minor topics selected by students. This course is differed from ERE 475 by conducting a group project to address treatment mechanisms and synthesize experimental results and other groups' operational data. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): ERE 440/643 or equivalent. Note: Credit will not be granted for both ERE 475 and ERE 675.

ERE 692 Remote Sensing of the Environment (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Understanding of various remote sensing systems, their applications, and advanced digital image processing techniques. Analysis of satellite and airborne-acquired remote sensing data. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): FEG 365 or equivalent introduction to remote sensing.

ERE 693 GIS-Based Modeling (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Geographical, temporal, environmental modeling concepts using GIS-based modeling languages and techniques. Various modeling concepts and techniques including spatial interpolation, suitability/capability modeling, hydrologic modeling, diffusion modeling, calibration, optimization, accessibility modeling, and rainfall-runoff modeling. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): ERE 551 or equivalent.

ERE 797 Research Methods in Environmental Resources Engineering (1 - 3)
One to three hours of discussion/seminar per week. Introduction to research facilities, opportunities, and responsibilities of graduate scholarship. Discussion of ERE research topics, including journal reading, proposal formulation, funding, and engineering tools. Use of scholarly resources including e-journals, web, proposal development, and presentations. Fall and Spring.

ERE 798 Research in Environmental and Resource Engineering (1 - 12)
Independent research topics in Environmental Resources Engineering. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

ERE 898 Professional Experience/Synthesis (1 - 6)
A supervised, documented professional work experience in the Master of Professional Studies degree program. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Prerequisite: Approval of proposed study plan by advisor, Department, and any sponsoring organization.

ERE 899 Masterís Thesis Research (1 - 12)
Research and independent study for the masterís degree and thesis. Fall, Spring and Summer.

ERE 999 Doctoral Thesis Research (1 - 12)
Research and independent study for the doctoral degree and dissertation. Fall, Spring and Summer.


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State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry
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