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Schedule of Classes
Fall Semester 2016
SUBJECT TO CHANGE UNTIL REGISTRATION BEGINS

Go to department: APM, BPE, BTC, CME, EFB, EHS, ENS, ERE, ESF, EST, EWP, FCH, FOR, FTC, GNE, LSA, MCR, PSE, SRE

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APM

APM 101 - Fundamentals of College Algebra (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Algebraic operations on polynomials and rational functions as expressions, in equations, or inequalities. Graphing of linear and polynomial equations. An emphasis is placed on algebraic operations of expressions with rational exponents. Fall.

APM 103 - Applied College Algebra and Trigonometry (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. This course is designed to enable non-science students to solve practical problems in their specific areas of study. Topics include algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions used in measurement and modeling. Applications include percents, scaling, slopes,and contour mapping. Spring, Fall.
Prerequisite(s): Math Placement or Consent of Instructor.

  • (3) Section 01 - Applied Algebra & Trigonometry (#20989)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 2:00 pm-3:20 pm Marshall 110 LA VIE
    Hybrid online course - contact instructor for details

APM 104 - College Algebra and Precalculus (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Course meets the SUNY general education requirement for mathematics. Elements of analytic geometry. Emphasis on the concepts of polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry and trigonometric functions and their application to design and life and management sciences. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite: Three years of high school mathematics.

APM 105 - Survey of Calculus and Its Applications I (4)

Four hours of lecture per week. Introduction to calculus for students in the life and management sciences. Elements of analytic geometry, functions and their graphs, with an emphasis on the concepts of limits, and differentiation techniques for algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions and their application to economics, and the life and management sciences. Some multivariable calculus including constrained optimization. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite: Precalculus or 3 1/2 years of high school mathematics. Note: Credit will not be granted for APM 105 after successful completion of MAT 284, MAT 285, or MAT 295 at SU.

  • (4) Section 01 - Survey Of Calc & Appl I (#19587)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Bray 321 LA VIE
      F 12:45 pm-1:40 pm Bray 313 LA VIE
  • (4) Section 02 - Survey Of Calc & Appl I (#19588)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Bray 313 CONAHAN
      F 9:30 am-10:25 am Bray 313 CONAHAN
  • (4) Section 04 - Survey Of Calc & Appl I (#20847)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 3:30 pm-4:50 pm Walter 210 CONAHAN
      F 10:35 am-11:30 am Marshall 110 CONAHAN
  • (4) Section 05 - Survey Of Calc & Appl I (#20446)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 5:00 pm-7:00 pm Marshall 111 THOMPSON,M
  • (4) Section 06 - Survey Of Calc & Appl I (#21383)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 3:30 pm-4:50 pm Bray 321 THOMPSON,M
      F 11:40 am-12:35 pm Marshall 111 THOMPSON,M

APM 106 - Survey of Calculus and Its Applications II (4)

Four hours of lecture per week. A continuation of calculus for students in the life and management sciences. Elements of analytic geometry. An introduction to integration and applications of the definite integral. Differentiation and integration of trigonometric functions. Applications of first order differential equations and partial derivatives. Spring.
Prerequisite: APM 105 or permission of the instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for APM 106 after successful completion of MAT 286 or MAT 296 at SU.

APM 205 - Calculus I for Science and Engineering (4)

Four hours of lecture/discussion per week. Analytic geometry, limits, derivatives of functions and equations, optimization, rates, graphs, differentials, mean-value theorem, and applications of the derivative. Fall.
Prerequisite: APM 104 or permission of instructor.

  • (4) Section 01 - Calculus I:Science & Engr (#20754)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Marshall 110 THOMPSON,M
      M 9:30 am-10:25 am Marshall 319 THOMPSON,M
  • (4) Section 03 - Calculus I:Science & Engr (#20755)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 3:30 pm-4:50 pm Marshall 110 ABDEL-AZIZ
      W 9:30 am-10:25 am Marshall 319 ABDEL-AZIZ

APM 206 - Calculus for Science and Engineering II (4)

Four hours of lecture/discussion per week. This course is a one semester continuation of differential calculus. Integral calculus is used to describe growth and size. Topics include: techniques of integration and their application, convergence of sequences and series, separable and first-order differential equations, and polar coordinates. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of a differential calculus course such as APM205 or MAT295.

  • (4) Section 01 - Calculus II:Science & Engr (#20990)
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      TuTh 3:30 pm-4:50 pm Bray 315 LA VIE
      F 9:30 am-10:25 am Marshall 110 LA VIE

APM 307 - Multivariable Calculus (4)

4 hours of lecture/discussion per week. Topics include vectors three dimensions, analytic geometry of three dimensions, parametric curves, partial derivatives, the gradient, optimization in several variables, multiple integration with change of variables across different coordinate systems, line integrals, and Green's Theorem. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisites: Completion of Differential and Integral Calculus with at least a C-; APM206 / MAT296, or the equivalent Note: Credit cannot be given for both APM307 and MAT397.

  • (4) Section 01 - Multivariable Calculus (#20991)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 9:30 am-10:50 am Marshall 110 THOMPSON,M
      M 2:15 pm-3:10 pm Bray 315 THOMPSON,M
  • (4) Section 02 - Multivariable Calculus (#20992)
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      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Bray 315 ABDEL-AZIZ
      F 10:35 am-11:30 am Walter 210 ABDEL-AZIZ

APM 391 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to concepts and methods of statistics as applied to problems in environmental science and forestry. Topics include inference (confidence intervals and hypothesis testing), sampling distributions, descriptive statistics, exploratory data analysis, comparison of population means and proportions, categorical data analysis, regression and correlation, and nonparametric methods. Fall or Spring.

  • (3) Section 01 - Intro/Probability&Stats (#20445)
    View Textbook Information
      MWF 10:35 am-11:30 am Marshall AUD KIERNAN
      Th 5:00 pm-5:55 pm Baker RTBA KIERNAN
  • (3) Section 02 - Intro/Probability&Stats (#20601)
    View Textbook Information
      MWF 10:35 am-11:30 am Marshall AUD KIERNAN
      F 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker RTBA KIERNAN
  • (3) Section 03 - Intro/Probability&Stats (#20602)
    View Textbook Information
      MWF 10:35 am-11:30 am Marshall AUD KIERNAN
      F 10:35 am-11:30 am Baker RTBA KIERNAN
  • (3) Section 04 - Intro/Probability&Stats (#20603)
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      MWF 10:35 am-11:30 am Marshall AUD KIERNAN
      F 11:40 am-12:35 pm Baker RTBA KIERNAN
  • (3) Section 05 - Intro/Probability&Stats (#20840)
    View Textbook Information
      MWF 10:35 am-11:30 am Marshall AUD KIERNAN
      F 12:45 pm-1:40 pm Baker RTBA KIERNAN

APM 395 - Probability and Statistics for Engineers (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. This course provides a rigorous introduction to calculus-based probability and statistical theory, with applications primarily drawn from engineering and the environmental sciences. Topics include: descriptive statistics and data presentation, probability, the theory and use of discrete and continuous probability distributions, confidence intervals, classical and distributional hypothesis testing, and regression analyses. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): One year of Calculus. Note: Credit will not be granted for both APM 395 and APM 595.

APM 510 - Statistical Analysis (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Applications of descriptive and inferential statistics to natural resource problems. Basic concepts and techniques of estimation, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing applied to one- and two-sample settings, paired designs, simple linear regression and correlation, contingency tables, and goodness of fit tests. Statistical software used to enhance data analysis skills. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing.

APM 595 - Probability and Statistics for Engineers (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. This course provides a rigorous introduction to calculus-based probability and statistical theory, with applications primarily drawn from engineering and the environmental sciences. Topics include: descriptive statistics and data presentation, probability, the theory and use of discrete and continuous probability distributions, confidence intervals, classical and distributional hypothesis testing, and regression analyses. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): One year of Calculus. Note: Credit will not be granted for both APM 395 and APM 595.

APM 625 - Sampling Methods (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Application of probability sampling methods to environmental science and forestry. Simple random, stratified, cluster, systematic, two-phase, line-intercept, point, variable radius plot, adaptive cluster, and other variable probability sampling designs; model-assisted ratio and regression estimators; inclusion probabilities; properties of estimators for design-based inference; Horvitz-Thompson estimation as a unifying theory. Fall.

APM 630 - Regression Analysis (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Topics include review of basic statistical concepts and matrix algebra, classical simple and multiple linear regression models, indicator or dummy variables in regression, residual analysis, transformation and logistic regression, weighted least squares, influence diagnostics, multicollinearity, nonlinear regression models, linear mixed models, statistical computing using SAS and interpretation of results. Fall.
Prerequisite: APM 391 or equivalent.

APM 645 - Nonparametric Statistics and Categorical Data Analysis (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Topics include: review of basic statistics, sign and ranked sign tests, median and Wilcoxon tests, binomial tests, x 2-test and contingency tables (with correspondence analysis), goodness-of-fit, nonparametric correlation and association analysis, nonparametric and robust regression, generalized linear models (Logistic and Poisson regression), and re-sampling methods (bootstrapping and cross-validation), statistical computing using SAS and interpretation of results. Fall.
Prerequisite: APM 391 or equivalent.

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BPE

BPE 132 - Introduction to Process Engineering I (1)

One hour lecture per week or three-hour lab/field trip per week. Introduction to process engineering as a field of study and career path. Topics covered include engineering ethics, laboratory and process safety, resumes and interviewing, and teamwork. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 132 and PSE 132.

BPE 300 - Introduction to Industrial Bioprocessing (3)

Three hours of lecture and discussions. Industrial examples of biotechnology and bioprocessing will be reviewed. Topics include applications of biotechnology and bioprocessing to the food, water and wastewater treatment, industrial biotechnology, biopharmaceutical, biochemical and biofuel industries. Through case studies of process flow sheets for different products students will develop an understanding of unit operations typically utilized in bioprocessing manufacturing operations. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): EFB 103 and EFB 104; co-requisite(s): FCH 221 and FCH 222.

  • (3) Section 01 - Intro/Industrial Bioprocessing (#21119)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:00 am-9:20 am Walter 210 IKUTA
      TuTh 8:00 am-9:20 am Walter 210 LIU

BPE 304 - Summer Internship in Bioprocess Engineering (2)

Students implement the theory and practice of their major by working for a company, typically during the summer preceding enrolling in the course. The internship should be a minimum of twelve weeks of full-time experience. Course expectations include a written report, an oral presentation, and a supervisor evaluation. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite: PSE 133 or BPE 133; PSE 200 or BPE 300; PSE 370; permission of instructor.

BPE 305 - Co-op Experience in Bioprocess Engineering (2)

One semester full-time bioprocessing experience as an engineering intern on company-assigned projects. Typically, the student works for a semester and adjacent summer also taking BPE 304. The student must submit a comprehensive report and give a presentation to fulfill this requirement. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite: PSE 370 or equivalent.

BPE 420 - Bioseparations (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Major unit operations used for the separation, purification and recovery of products from complex mixtures. Separation processes including sedimentation, filtration, centrifugation, membrane ultra-filtration, nanofiltration, ion exchange processes, chromatographic separations. Fall.
Prerequisite: BPE 310. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 420 and BPE 620.

BPE 421 - Bioprocess Kinetics and Systems Engineering (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Topics in biochemical kinetics and reaction engineering are discussed including their application to microbiological systems used for bioprocessing. Batch and continuous biochemical reactor designs. The role of agitation in gas and solids delivery and heat removal for inclusion in design decisions. Impact of engineering parameters and design decisions on operability and economics. Fall.
Prerequisite: BPE 335. Co-requisite: BPE 420. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 421 and BPE 621.

BPE 435 - Unit Process Operations (3)

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory and/or recitation, discussions per week. Topics include packed towers, tray columns, fluidized bed, fluid mechanic limitations, pressure drop, mass transfer coefficient, mass transfer limits, thermodynamic limits, equilibrium stage calculations, packed tower and tray column design and performance analysis. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): BPE 335/336.

  • (3) Section 01 - Unit Process Operations (#21120)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:00 am-8:55 am Walter 211 CHATTERJEE
      Tu 2:00 pm-4:00 pm Walter 407 CHATTERJEE

BPE 438 - Introduction to Biorefinery Processes (3)

Three hours of lecture and discussions per week. Topics covered include chemical and physical properties of biomass feedstocks; sustainable biomass production/utilization, chemical and biological processes of converting plant biomass to chemicals, liquid fuels, and materials. Focus on green chemistry and/or environmentally benign processes, with some discussions on political and social aspects of sustainability and renewability. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): Cell biology and BPE 335 Transport Phenomena. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 438 and BPE 638.

BPE 498 - Research Problem in Bioprocess Engineering (1-4)

Independent study. The student is assigned a research problem in bioprocess engineering. The student must make a systematic survey of available literature on the assigned problem. Emphasis is on application of correct research techniques rather than on discovery of results of commercial importance. The information obtained in the literature survey, along with the data developed as a result of the investigation, is to be presented as a technical report. Fall, Spring, and Summer.

Professor consent is required to register for this course.

BPE 510 - Introduction to Polymer Coatings (3)

Fundamental science of polymerization and film formation for a wide class of organic coatings, including acrylics, latexes, polyesters, amino resins, epoxies, alkyds, and silicon derivatives as well as the integration of appropriate binders and additives affecting coating quality. Reaction chemistries and their distinguishing characteristics for several cross-linking agents. Reaction kinetics are considered with emphasis on the influence of conditions during synthesis. Various organic coatings are compared based on desired mechanical and optical properties along with specific applications. The nature of defects and the resulting effect on product lifetime of coatings are examined. Online Academic Year and/or Summer Session.
Prerequisite(s): B.S. from an accredited institution with at least one semester of organic chemistry or permission of instructor.

BPE 511 - Radiation Curing Equipment, Instrumentation and Safety (3)

Technologies used for commercial radiation curing for energy-efficient and environmentally-responsible curing of resins, inks, coatings and adhesives pertinent to industry chemists, engineers, technicians, and managers. Ultra violet light (UV), electron beam (EB), radio frequency (RF) and Infrared (IR) generating systems, along with ancillary equipment used to quantify energy deposition. Basic equipment functions, interaction of radiation sources with specific substrates and chemistries, benefits and drawbacks of each technology, and safety and handling considerations. Emphasis is placed on effectively selecting and justifying equipment appropriate for specific applications. Online Academic Year and/or Summer Session.
Prerequisite(s): B.S. from an accredited institution with at least one semester of organic chemistry or permission of instructor.

BPE 536 - Radiation Curing of Polymer Technologies (3)

Broad treatment of development and use of radiation curing of polymer technologies as they apply to industry-related roles such as chemists, engineers, technicians, and managers. Properties and development of free-radical and cationic systems initiated by various radiation sources. Chemical and physical underpinnings of common radiation curable materials and mechanisms. Analysis techniques that monitor the cure reaction and the properties of cured material. Emphasis on the considerations and challenges in common applications of radiation curable polymer systems and associated costs, regulatory, and safety considerations. Online Academic Year and/or Summer Session.
Prerequisite(s): B.S. from an accredited institution with at least one semester of organic chemistry or permission of instructor.

BPE 596 - Special Topics (1-3)

Lectures, conferences, discussions and laboratory. Topics in environmental and resource engineering not covered in established courses. Designed for the beginning graduate student or selected upper-division undergraduate. Fall and/or Spring.

BPE 620 - Bioseparations (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Cell disruption, solid liquid separations, centrifugation, chromatographic techniques (gel filtration, affinity, ion exchange), and membrane processes. Extraction. Crystallization and drying. Aseptic filtration. Fall.
Prerequisite: BPE 501. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 620 and BPE 420.

BPE 621 - Bioreaction Engineering (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Bioprocess kinetics, reaction engineering, mass and energy balances, stoichiometry, enzyme kinetics, growth and product synthesis kinetics, mass transfer effects, bioreactor analysis and design, instrumentation and control, batch processing, bioreactor scale-up, agitation, oxygen delivery, heat removal and kinetics of sterilization (clean and sterilization in place (CIP and SIP). Spring.
Prerequisites: Mass and Heat Transfer, or Transport Phenomena. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 621 and PBE 421.

BPE 635 - Unit Process Operations (3)

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory and/or recitation, discussions. Topics include packed towers, tray columns, fluidized bed, fluid mechanic limitations, pressure drop, mass transfer coefficient, mass transfer limits, thermodynamic limits, equilibrium stage calculations, packed tower and tray column design and performance analysis. Fall.

  • (3) Section 01 - Unit Process Operations (#21121)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:00 am-8:55 am Walter 211 CHATTERJEE
      Tu 2:00 pm-4:00 pm Walter 407 CHATTERJEE

BPE 638 - Introduction to Biorefinery Processes (3)

Three hours of lecture and discussions per week. Topics covered include chemical and physical properties of biomass feedstocks; sustainable biomass production/utilization, chemical and biological processes of converting plant biomass to chemicals, liquid fuels, and materials. Focus on green chemistry and/or environmentally benign processes, with some discussions on political and social aspects of sustainability and renewability. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 438 and BPE 638.

BPE 658 - Advanced Biocatalysis (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. This course is intended for graduate students in Bioprocess Engineering. Topics covered in this course may include enzyme, microbial and/or mammalian cell catalyzed molecular transformations. Biotransformations occur, at the fundamental level, due to the particular enzymes. Interactions between enzyme and ligand / substrate hold the key on how the reaction is regulated. On the cell level, enzymes work in tandem to convert one or more key substrate into one or more desired product. The mechanism and progress in the understanding of molecular transformations in microbial and mammalian systems are selectively covered. Discussions will be on an advanced level especially for kinetics and reactor analysis. Fall.
Prerequisite: BPE 421 Bioprocess Kinetics and System Engineering, or permission of instructor.

BPE 797 - Seminar (1-3)

Discussion of assigned topics in the fields related to Bioprocess Engineering. Spring and Fall.

BPE 798 - Research in Bioprocess Engineering (1-12)

Independent research topics in Bioprocess Engineering. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

BPE 898 - Professional Experience/Synthesis (1-6)

A supervised, documented professional work experience in the Master of Professional Studies degree program. Fall, Spring, or Summer.
Pre- or co-requisite(s): Approval of proposed study plan by advisor, Faculty, and any sponsoring organization.

BPE 899 - Master's Thesis Research (1-12)

Research and independent study for the master's thesis. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

BPE 999 - Doctoral Thesis Research (1-12)

Research and independent study for the doctoral dissertation. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

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BTC

BTC 132 - Orientation Seminar (1)

One hour of lecture or discussion per week. Occasional tour of laboratories or field trips. Introduction to campus facilities, personnel, lower-division curriculum, and upper-division study options to facilitate transition of students into the program and assist them in making informed decisions on course selection and future career directions. Fall.

BTC 298 - Research Apprenticeship in Biotechnology (1-3)

Full- or part-time engagement as volunteer or employee on research project having a biotechnology focus consistent with the studentís educational and professional goals. Tenure at SUNY-ESF or outside institution. Faculty member in the BTC program will serve as studentís sponsor. Study plan outlining the apprenticeshipís educational goals completed prior to its commencement. Record of activities and performance assessment by faculty sponsor generated after apprenticeship termination. Grading satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Fall, Spring, Summer.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

BTC 401 - Molecular Biology Techniques (4)

Two hours lecture and six hours laboratory per week. Theories behind techniques in molecular biology are introduced in lecture. Laboratory includes the extraction and quantification of genomic and plasmid DNA, agarose gel electrophoresis, restriction digestion, ligation, bacterial transformation, DNA sequencing and PCR. Additional topics in molecular biology are presented by the students. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): EFB 307, 308, 325, or equivalents. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BTC 401 and EFB 601.

  • (4) Section 01 - Molecular Biol Techniques (#20834)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:25 pm Marshall 212 NEWMAN,L
      TuTh 2:00 pm-5:00 pm Illick 424 NEWMAN,L
  • (4) Section 02 - Molecular Biol Techniques (#20836)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:25 pm Marshall 212 NEWMAN,L
      WF 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 424 NEWMAN,L

BTC 420 - Internship in Biotechnology (1-5)

Full- or part-time employment or volunteer work with an agency, institution, clinic, professional group, business, or individual involved in activities consistent with the student's educational and professional goals. The extent of the internship activities shall be commensurate with the credits undertaken. A resident faculty member must serve as the student's academic sponsor. A study plan outlining the internship's educational goals must be completed prior to its commencement. Grading will be based on a written report from the student and submitted to the sponsoring faculty member and on an evaluation of the student's performance written by the site supervisor to the sponsoring faculty member. Fall, Spring, Summer.
Prerequisite: Consent of a faculty sponsor.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

BTC 426 - Plant Tissue Culture Methods (3)

Two hours of lecture and discussion and three hours of laboratory per week. Introduction to plant tissue culture for biotechnology research and as a propagation method. Emphasis will be on learning laboratory instrumentation and techniques for establishing cell cultures, producing transgenic cell lines, and regenerating whole plants. Fall.
Prerequisites: One course in botany, microbiology, or genetics; or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for BTC 426 and FOR 626/EFB 626.

  • (3) Section 01 - Plant Tissue Culture Methods (#20564)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Marshall 110 MAYNARD
      Tu 12:30 pm-3:20 pm Marshall 217 MAYNARD
  • (3) Section 02 - Plant Tissue Culture Methods (#20661)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Marshall 110 MAYNARD
      W 12:45 pm-3:05 pm Marshall 217 MAYNARD
  • (3) Section 03 - Plant Tissue Culture Methods (#20662)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Marshall 110 MAYNARD
      Th 12:30 pm-3:20 pm Marshall 217 MAYNARD

BTC 498 - Research Problems in Biotechnology (1-9)

Laboratory research experience with research time agreed upon by student and instructor. Independent research experience covering biotechnological topics. Specific topics determined through consultation between student and appropriate faculty member. Tutorial conferences, discussions, and critiques scheduled as necessary. Grading determined by the instructor and could include, but not required, evaluation of skills learned, data obtained, and laboratory notebook record keeping. A final written report is required. Fall or Spring.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

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CME

CME 132 - Orientation Seminar: Sustainable Construction Management and Engineering (1)

One hour of lecture and discussion per week. Introduction to campus resources available to ensure academic success in the area of Sustainable Construction Management and Engineering. Fall.

CME 151 - Introduction to Financial Accounting (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Financial accounting concepts that aid entrepreneurs, managers, investors, and creditors in planning, operating, and analyzing a business. Emphasis is on interpretation of financial statements. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): none.

CME 226 - Statics and Mechanics of Materials (4)

Four hours of lecture/discussion per week. Equilibrium systems of forces in two and three dimensions. Analysis of structural components for stresses and deformations. Stability and design of beams and columns made of common engineering materials. Design methods and safety considerations. Spring and Fall.
Prerequisite: Calculus I, Physics I.

CME 255 - Plan Interpretation and Quantity Takeoff (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introductory course in construction plan interpretation and quantity takeoff. Will address how to read and interpret construction plans and introduce basic quantity takeoff skills. Fall.

CME 303 - Sustainable Construction Management and Engineering Internship (1-3)

Full or part-time employment with an organization that involves the student in an educational experience in a professional establishment. A resident faculty member must serve as the studentís academic sponsor. A study plan that describes the internshipís educational goals must be submitted prior to its commencement. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite: Upper-division status.

CME 305 - Sustainable Energy Systems for Buildings (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Exploration of construction management-related issues in creating a more sustainable energy use in our building stock. Integrating sustainable energy sources in construction as well as issues related to using energy more efficiently. Fall.

CME 327 - Site Investigations and Solutions (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Principles of geotechnical engineering, site investigation methods, methods for improving sites, and the role of geotechnical engineering in construction contracts. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): none

CME 331 - Construction Safety (3)

Occupational Safety and Health Practices in the construction industry with coverage of the U. S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Regulations (CFR 1910 and 1926 Standards). Detailed study of Construction Safety and Hazardous Communications programs, personal protective equipment, tools, electrical power, ladders, and scaffolding, floor and wall openings, cranes and power equipment. Special problems related to concrete work, erection and demolition. OSHA 30 Hr. card earned. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 331 and CME 531.

CME 335 - Cost Engineering (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Statistics, cost of money, rates of return, cash flow, budget development, cost tracking, productivity and progress, constructability and value engineering, change control and risk analysis. Fall.
Prerequisite: Upper division standing or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 335 and CME 535.

CME 342 - Light Construction (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. An introduction to the construction process with an emphasis on the unique aspects of light construction. Introduces construction management principles related to material properties, building science, structural design, estimating, and scheduling. Fall.

CME 387 - Renewable Materials for Sustainable Construction (3)

Three hours of discussion, lecture and demonstration per week. Properties and uses of major structural construction materials. Identification and knowledge of the major wood species and their applications in construction. Fall.

CME 444 - Materials Marketing (3)

Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Fundamentals of marketing forest products, building and construction industry materials, including products, markets, distribution, segmentation, pricing, promotion and sales. Specific focus is on the unique nature and issues of forest products and building materials; vertical and horizontal integration, distribution channels, market segmentation and product positioning strategies. Fall.
Prerequisite: FOR 207 Introduction to Economics or equivalent.

CME 453 - Construction Planning and Scheduling (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. The use of common types of schedules: Gantt, Activity on Node, Precedence Diagram, PERT and Linear. Identification of activities and performance duration analyses of these activities. Updating of schedules, resource planning and assignment, cost planning and scheduling are all covered. Schedule development is performed both manually and with industry-accepted software. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): CME 343 or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 453 and CME 653.

CME 488 - Professional Construction Project Management Presentation Seminar (2)

Two hours of lecture/seminar/preparation per week. A preparatory course for participation in a professional construction management proposal process including proposal development and professional presentation of the proposal. The course culminates in participation at a regional construction management competition sponsored by the Associated Schools of Construction Region 1. Fall.
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and permission of the instructor.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

  • (2) Section 01 - Prof Cons Project Mgt Pres Sem (#21089)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 2:15 pm-3:10 pm Baker 159 CROVELLA
    Professor consent is required to register for this section.

CME 495 - Undergraduate Experience in College Teaching (1-3)

Undergraduate students gain experience as teaching assistants. They assist the instructor with the teaching and learning experience, assist students with learning course concepts, and mentor students on how to succeed in an undergraduate course. Responsibilities vary by section and instructor. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. The student must have previously completed, with grade of B or better, the course in which they will assist.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

CME 496 - Special Topics (1-3)


CME 497 - Senior Ethics Seminar (1)

One hour of lecture/discussion per week. Student papers/ presentations are directed toward professional issues in ethics and career preparation, Fall.
Prerequisite(s): Senior status in SCME.

CME 498 - Research or Design Problem (1-3)

Conferences, library, laboratory and/or field research on a specific problem in wood products engineering. Written report required. Fall, Spring and Summer.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and advisor.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

CME 505 - Sustainable Energy Systems for Buildings (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Exploration of construction management-related issues in creating a more sustainable energy use in our building stock. Integrating sustainable energy sources in construction as well as issues related to using energy more efficiently. An experiment-based, analytical, or evaluative project is required. Fall
Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing, or upper‐division standing with approval of instructor. Note: Credit will not be given for both CME 305 and CME 505.

CME 531 - Construction Safety (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Occupational Safety and Health practices in the construction industry. An overview of the US Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Regulations, 29 CFR 1910 and 29 CFR 1926. Comprehensive review of: general safety and health requirements, hazard communication, confined space entry, lockout/tagout programs, workplace violence, personal protective equipment, fire protection, signs and barricades, rigging, small tools Ė hand and power, welding and cutting, electrical, fall protection, scaffolding, cranes, mobile equipment, excavation and trenching, steel erection, stairways and ladders and permissible exposure limits. A term paper is required. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 531 and CME 331.

CME 535 - Cost Engineering (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Statistics, cost of money, rates of return, cash flow, budget development, cost tracking, productivity and progress, constructability and value engineering, change control and risk analysis.
Prerequisite: Upper division standing or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 535 and CME 335.

CME 587 - Renewable Materials for Sustainable Construction (3)

Three hours of discussion, lecture and demonstration per week. Properties and uses of wood and other renewable materials as a major construction materials. Identification and knowledge of the major wood species and their applications in construction. Evaluation of current practices and materials. Fall.

CME 596 - Special Topics (1-3)


CME 653 - Construction Planning and Scheduling (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. The use of Gantt, Activity on Node, Precedence Diagram, PERT and Linear schedules. Identification of activities and duration analyses of these activities. Update schedules, plan and assign resources, plan cost and schedule. Schedule development is performed both manually and with industry accepted software. A term paper describing how the relevant topics of the course fit a specific industry application and an additional project utilizing the software are required. Fall.
Prerequisites: Estimating experience and/or equivalent scheduling experience. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 653 and CME 453.

CME 686 - Wood-Water Relationships (3)

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Relationship between wood moisture content and the environment, electrical and thermal properties, theories of moisture sorption, hygroscopic swelling and shrinking, thermodynamics of moisture sorption, mechanism of moisture movement as it relates to activation theory. Laboratory exercises will complement the theoretical topics discussed in the lecture. Fall.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CME 796 - Advanced Topics (1-3)


CME 797 - Seminar (1-3)

Discussion of assigned topics in the fields related to Sustainable Construction Management and Wood Science. Spring and Fall.

CME 798 - RESEARCH IN SUSTAINABLE CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT AND WOOD SCIENCE (1-12)

Independent research topics in Sustainable Construction Management and Wood Science. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

CME 898 - Professional Experience/Synthesis (1-6)

A supervised, documented professional work experience in the Master of Professional Studies degree program. Fall, Spring, or Summer.
Pre- or co-requisite(s): Approval of proposed study plan by advisor, Faculty, and any sponsoring organization.

CME 899 - Master's Thesis Research (1-12)

Research and independent study for the master's thesis. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

CME 999 - Doctoral Thesis Research (1-12)

Research and independent study for the doctoral dissertation. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

TOP
EFB

EFB 101 - General Biology I: Organismal Biology and Ecology (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Introductory exploration of biological principles at ecosystem, population, and organismal levels. Emphasis on form, function, diversity, ecology and evolution of living organisms. Fall.
Co-requisite: EFB 102.

  • (3) Section 01 - Gen Bio I:Organismal Bio&Ecol (#20709)
    View Textbook Information
      MWF 8:25 am-9:20 am Marshall AUD FIERKE
  • (3) Section 02 - Gen Bio I:Organismal Bio&Ecol (#20734)
    View Textbook Information
      MWF 11:40 am-12:35 pm Marshall AUD FIERKE

EFB 102 - General Biology I Laboratory (1)

Three hours of laboratory per week. Major concepts of organismal biology and ecology will be reinforced with hands-on laboratory exercises and required field trips exploring the form, function, diversity, ecology, and evolution of living organisms. Fall.
Co-requisite: EFB 101.

EFB 120 - The Global Environment and the Evolution of Human Society (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. An integrated overview of large-scale environmental issues and their relation to the development of human societies and resource-use strategies over time. Focus is on population growth and societal pressures on physical and biotic resources. Topics include energy-use issues, causes and socio-economic implications of climate change, pollution, and loss of biodiversity. Fall and Spring.

EFB 132 - Orientation Seminar: Environmental and Forest Biology (1)

One hour of lecture, discussion and/or exercises per week. Introduction to campus resources available to ensure academic success. Introduction to EFB as a field of inquiry. Fall.

EFB 200 - Physics of Life (3)

Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Introduction to basic principles of physics from a perspective of biological function, structure and adaptation. Fall.

EFB 210 - Diversity of Life I (3)

Two hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory instruction per week. Introductory exploration of the diversity of life at local, regional and global scales. Hands-on laboratory exercises explore the form, function, diversity, ecology, and evolution of living organisms, focusing on viruses, fungi and plants. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): One year of introductory biology.

  • (3) Section 01 - Diversity of Life I (#21059)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Marshall AUD WEBER
      Tu 8:00 am-10:50 am Illick 314 ADAMS
  • (3) Section 02 - Diversity of Life I (#21060)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Marshall AUD WEBER
      Tu 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Illick 314 ADAMS
  • (3) Section 03 - Diversity of Life I (#21061)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Marshall AUD WEBER
      W 10:35 am-1:25 pm Illick 314 ADAMS
  • (3) Section 04 - Diversity of Life I (#21062)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Marshall AUD WEBER
      W 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 314 ADAMS
  • (3) Section 05 - Diversity of Life I (#21232)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Marshall AUD WEBER
      Th 8:00 am-10:50 am Illick 314 ADAMS
  • (3) Section 06 - Diversity of Life I (#21063)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Marshall AUD WEBER
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Illick 314 ADAMS
  • (3) Section 07 - Diversity of Life I (#21233)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Marshall AUD WEBER
      F 8:00 am-10:50 am Illick 314 ADAMS
  • (3) Section 08 - Diversity of Life I (#21384)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Marshall AUD WEBER
      F 12:45 pm-3:35 pm Illick 314 ADAMS

EFB 298 - Research Apprenticeship in Environmental Biology (1-3)

Full- or part-time engagement as volunteer or employee on research project having environmental biology focus consistent with the studentís educational and professional goals. Tenure at SUNYESF or outside institution. EFB-based faculty member serves as studentís sponsor. Study plan outlining the apprenticeshipís educational goals completed prior to its commencement. Record of activities and performance assessment by faculty sponsor generated after apprenticeship termination. Grading Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Fall, Spring, Summer.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

EFB 303 - Introductory Environmental Microbiology (4)

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. An introduction to the biology of microorganisms and viruses and a study of their interactions with other microbes and macroorganisms. Fall.

  • (4) Section 01 - Intro Envrn Microbiology (#19590)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 8:00 am-9:20 am Bray 313 GREEN
      Tu 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Illick 122 GREEN
  • (4) Section 02 - Intro Envrn Microbiology (#19591)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 8:00 am-9:20 am Bray 313 GREEN
      W 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 122 GREEN

EFB 307 - Principles of Genetics (3)

Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. A general course covering concepts of genetics and evolution basic to upper-division biology and biochemistry courses. Includes the inheritance and analysis of Mendelian and quantitative traits, the chemical nature of the gene and its action, genetic engineering, the genetic structure of populations and their evolution. Numerical methods for characterizing and analyzing genetic data are introduced. Fall.

EFB 308 - Principles of Genetics Laboratory (1)

Three hours of auto-tutorial laboratory per week. Experiments with plants and animals and computer simulation exercises demonstrate the basic principles of inheritance of Mendelian traits and changes in populations caused by major forces in evolution or by breeding procedures. Numerical methods for characterizing quantitative traits and for testing hypotheses are introduced. Fall.
Co-requisite: EFB 307.

EFB 312 - Introduction to Personal Environmental Interpretation Methods (3)

Two hours of lecture and 2 hours of recitation per week. One required Saturday field trip. Personal interpretation teaches a variety of face-to-face techniques used to connect the public with environmental science by providing an introduction to history of interpretation, popular interpretive and environmental education activities and curriculum, evaluation of programs, and lesson plans. Explores and illustrates the research and philosophy of environmental interpretation. Credit will not be granted for both EFB 312 and EFB 512. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): EFB 320, junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor

  • (3) Section 01 - Intro/Pers Env Interp Methods (#21262)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 10:35 am-11:30 am Illick 12 FOLTA
      M 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 12 FOLTA
  • (3) Section 02 - Intro/Pers Env Interp Methods (#21263)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 10:35 am-11:30 am Illick 12 FOLTA
      W 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 12 FOLTA
  • (3) Section 03 - Intro/Pers Env Interp Methods (#21264)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 10:35 am-11:30 am Illick 12 FOLTA
      Tu 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Illick 12 FOLTA

EFB 320 - General Ecology (4)

Three hours of lecture and one three-hour field trip/laboratory per week. An introduction to plant and animal ecology, including concepts and techniques in population ecology, community dynamics, physiological and behavioral ecology, biogeography, ecosystem ecology, nutrient cycling and energy flow. Ecological management applications, human ecological impacts and problems are considered. Fall.

  • (4) Section 01 - General Ecology (#19592)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Marshall AUD HORTON
      Tu 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Illick 220 HORTON
  • (4) Section 02 - General Ecology (#19593)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Marshall AUD HORTON
      Tu 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Illick 238 HORTON
  • (4) Section 03 - General Ecology (#19594)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Marshall AUD HORTON
      W 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 220 HORTON
  • (4) Section 04 - General Ecology (#19595)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Marshall AUD HORTON
      Tu 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Illick 251 HORTON
  • (4) Section 05 - General Ecology (#19596)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Marshall AUD HORTON
      W 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 306 HORTON
  • (4) Section 06 - General Ecology (#19597)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Marshall AUD HORTON
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Illick 220 HORTON
  • (4) Section 07 - General Ecology (#19598)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Marshall AUD HORTON
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Illick 112 HORTON
  • (4) Section 08 - General Ecology (#19599)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Marshall AUD HORTON
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Illick 306 HORTON
  • (4) Section 09 - General Ecology (#20814)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Marshall AUD HORTON
      F 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 220 HORTON
  • (4) Section 10 - General Ecology (#20815)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Marshall AUD HORTON
      F 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 306 HORTON

EFB 336 - Dendrology (3)

Two hours of lecture per week and one three-hour laboratory/field trip. Field study, identification, natural history and elementary silvics of important forest trees of North America. Fall.

  • (3) Section 01 - Dendrology I (#19600)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:25 am-9:20 am Marshall AUD LEOPOLD
      M 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 313 LEOPOLD
  • (3) Section 02 - Dendrology I (#19601)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:25 am-9:20 am Marshall AUD LEOPOLD
      M 2:15 pm-5:50 pm Illick 314 LEOPOLD
  • (3) Section 03 - Dendrology I (#19602)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:25 am-9:20 am Marshall AUD LEOPOLD
      Tu 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Illick 313 LEOPOLD
  • (3) Section 05 - Dendrology I (#19603)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:25 am-9:20 am Marshall AUD LEOPOLD
      W 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 313 LEOPOLD
  • (3) Section 06 - Dendrology I (#19604)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:25 am-9:20 am Marshall AUD LEOPOLD
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Illick 313 LEOPOLD
  • (3) Section 08 - Dendrology I (#19605)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:25 am-9:20 am Marshall AUD LEOPOLD
      F 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 313 LEOPOLD

EFB 351 - Forest Entomology (3)

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Basic insect diversity, ecology and pest management with an emphasis on insect pests of forested ecosystems. Designed for students in Environmental Biology, Forest Health and Forest Resources Management. Fall, even years.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 351 and EFB 551.

  • (3) Section 01 - Forest Entomology (#27572)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 11:40 am-12:35 pm Baker 148 TEALE
      M 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 117 TEALE
  • (3) Section 02 - Forest Entomology (#27573)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 11:40 am-12:35 pm Baker 148 TEALE
      Tu 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Illick 117 TEALE
  • (3) Section 03 - Forest Entomology (#27574)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 11:40 am-12:35 pm Baker 148 TEALE
      W 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 117 TEALE
  • (3) Section 04 - Forest Entomology (#27575)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 11:40 am-12:35 pm Baker 148 TEALE
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Illick 117 TEALE

EFB 360 - Epidemiology (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introduction to the study of disease in populations and factors influencing disease occurrence. Case studies explore population measures of disease, clinical measures and causation. Emphasizes quantitative approaches, study design, ethics, intervention and implementation. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): One year of Introductory Biology, one Statistics course or equivalent by permission.

  • (3) Section 01 - Epidemiology (#28183)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 10:35 am-11:30 am Illick 334 NEWMAN,L
      F 12:45 pm-1:40 pm Illick 334 NEWMAN,L

EFB 390 - Wildlife Ecology and Management (4)

Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation per week. A study of the ecological principles governing wild animal populations and their habitats, and the relationship of these principles to management programs and decisions. Directed primarily toward students majoring in wildlife science, conservation biology, and forest resources management. Fall.
Prerequisite or co-requisite: General ecology.

  • (4) Section 01 - Wildlife Ecology&Mgt (#20995)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:00 am-9:20 am Illick 5 FARRELL,S
    Additional 1 hour recitation TBA.
  • (4) Section 02 - Wildlife Ecology&Mgt (#20996)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:00 am-9:20 am Illick 5 FARRELL,S
    Additional 1 hour recitation TBA.
  • (4) Section 03 - Wildlife Ecology&Mgt (#20997)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:00 am-9:20 am Illick 5 FARRELL,S
    Additional 1 hour recitation TBA.
  • (4) Section 04 - Wildlife Ecology&Mgt (#20998)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:00 am-9:20 am Illick 5 FARRELL,S
    Additional 1 hour recitation TBA.
  • (4) Section 05 - Wildlife Ecology&Mgt (#21381)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:00 am-9:20 am Illick 5 FARRELL,S
    Additional 1 hour recitation TBA.

EFB 400 - Toxic Health Hazards (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to contemporary concepts of toxicology and to scientific basis for regulations and personal decisions about toxic health hazards. For students in natural or social sciences of environmental relevance. Topics include xenobiotic load, co-evolution of plant/animal defenses, chemical interactions, animal tests and risk assessment. Fall.
Prerequisites: General biology and general chemistry. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 400 and EFB 600.

EFB 411 - Research Methods: Understanding the Adirondack Ecosystem (3)

Two hours of lecture/discussion and one three hour field trip per week. An introduction to biodiversity, forest and wildlife management, invasive species, climate science, and the role of humans in the context of the Adirondack Park. Biotic and abiotic drivers of the Adirondack ecosystem, field data collection methods and policy and sustainability are considered. Explores the role of science in natural resource decision-making and the uses and limitations of ecological data and planning tools. Requires concurrent registration with other Sustaining the Park courses. Fall, Newcomb Campus.
Prerequisite(s): General Biology or equivalent coursework Co-requisites: EST 401, EST 402, EST 403, EST 404

  • (3) Section 01 - Rsrch Methds:Adirondack Ecosys (#21293)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh Day TBA MCNULTY
    Adirondack Residential Semester

EFB 420 - Internship in Environmental and Forest Biology (1-5)

Full- or part-time engagement as volunteer or employee in professional experience having environmental biology focus. Tenure at outside institution under guidance of external supervisor, but with EFB-based faculty sponsor. Requires initial study plan outlining educational goals, plus record of activities and supervisorís assessment of studentís performance upon completion. Grading satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Fall, Spring, Summer.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

EFB 424 - Limnology: Study of Inland Waters (3)

Three hours of lecture per week, with some additional hands-on activities during the semester. An introduction to the geology, physics, chemistry and biology of inland waters (lotic and lentic). The course focuses on inland waters as integrated ecosystems and explores the effects of natural and anthropogenic perturbations on these systems. Fall.
Prerequisites: Senior status, introductory courses in physics and chemistry, and EFB 320, or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 424 and EFB 624.

EFB 427 - Plant Anatomy and Development (3)

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory instruction per week. This course offers a dynamic approach to the study of plant anatomy by understanding how cells, tissues and organs are formed using concepts and tools from genetics and molecular biology. Laboratory involves hands-on activities using current techniques. Fall.
Prerequisite: one year introductory biology. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 427 and EFB 627.

  • (3) Section 01 - Plant Anatomy & Development (#21350)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 10:35 am-11:30 am Illick 238 FERNANDO
      M 12:45 pm-3:35 pm Illick 424 FERNANDO
  • (3) Section 02 - Plant Anatomy & Development (#21351)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 10:35 am-11:30 am Illick 238 FERNANDO
      M 3:45 pm-6:35 pm Illick 424 FERNANDO

EFB 428 - Mycorrhizal Ecology (3)

Two hours of combined lecture/discussion and 3 hours of laboratory per week. Introduction to mycorrhizal symbioses, their role in plant nutrient uptake, and function in plant community dynamics. Emphasis is on important historical and current literature, and on learning methodological approaches used in mycorrhizal research. Fall, even years.
Prerequisites: General ecology or plant ecology, genetics. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 428 and EFB 628.

  • (3) Section 01 - Mycorrhizal Ecology (#27576)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 10:35 am-11:30 am Baker 432 HORTON
      F 9:30 am-12:30 pm Illick 306 HORTON

EFB 434 - Ecosystem Restoration Design (4)

A summer field course followed by a weekly seminar and workshop during the Fall. Will travel in Mesoamerica. Will examine degraded and restored ecosystems. Will travel on public transportation and stay in low-cost hostels. Will use contemporary problems as source material for course projects. Continuation of restoration project designs and analysis from the field trip will be part of the coursework after returning to Syracuse. The course will explore restoration strategies in many different ecosystems. Will consider restoration needs in less developed countries, and how that shapes design and evaluation. Course fee. Fall.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

EFB 435 - Flowering Plants: Diversity, Evolution, and Systematics (3)

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Diversity, evolution, and systematics of flowering plants with emphasis on flower structures and reproductive strategies. Flowering plant identification skills are built from examination of a broad diversity of species from major globallydistributed families with particular focus on flora of the Northeastern U.S. [Fall]
Prerequisite(s): General Biology I and II or equivalent and at least junior standing.

  • (3) Section 01 - Flowering Plnts:Div,Evol&Systm (#21280)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 12:45 pm-1:40 pm Marshall 110 DOVCIAK
      F 12:45 pm-3:35 pm Illick 238 DOVCIAK

EFB 444 - Biodiversity and Geography of Nature (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Earth history (plate tectonics, etc.), topography and geographic variation in environmental conditions influence species and communities. Major geographic patterns in biological diversity and strategies for conserving native species are presented. Fall, even years.
Prerequisite: EFB 320 or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 444 and EFB 644.

  • (3) Section 01 - Biodiversity&Geography/Nature (#27577)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 9:30 am-10:50 am Baker 148 LOMOLINO

EFB 453 - Parasitology (3)

Two hours of lecture/discussion per week, three hours laboratory per week. Diversity, ecology, and impact of parasites of ecological, medical, and veterinary importance. Emphasis on identification, life history, control, host-parasite interactions and evolution, population patterns, and parasite communities. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): One year of Introductory Biology, Ecology. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 453 and EFB 653.

  • (3) Section 01 - Parasitology (#21405)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 12:45 pm-1:40 pm Illick 238 WHIPPS
      F 12:45 pm-3:35 pm Illick 122 WHIPPS

EFB 462 - Animal Physiology: Environmental and Ecological (3)

Three hours of lecture, discussion and/or exercises per week. An introduction to the physiology of adaptation to the physical and biotic environments, including animal energetics, biology of body size and physiological constraints on animal life history. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 462 and EFB 662.

  • (3) Section 01 - Animal Physiol:Envrn&Ecol (#20443)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 9:30 am-10:50 am TURNER
    Course meets online with 4 in-person exams a semester

EFB 483 - Mammal Diversity (4)

Three hours of classroom instruction and three hours of laboratory per week. Describes the evolutionary development, ecology and diversity of mammals world-wide and within New York State. Laboratory exercises and discussions complement lectures, providing hands-on experience in identification, adaptive morphology, and techniques in field mammalogy. Fall.
Prerequisites: Junior standing in EFB.

  • (4) Section 01 - Mammal Diversity (#21399)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Illick 5 LOMOLINO
      M 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 238 LOMOLINO
  • (4) Section 02 - Mammal Diversity (#21400)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Illick 5 LOMOLINO
      F 9:30 am-12:20 pm Illick 238 LOMOLINO
  • (4) Section 03 - Mammal Diversity (#21401)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Illick 5 LOMOLINO
      W 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 238 LOMOLINO
  • (4) Section 04 - Mammal Diversity (#21402)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Illick 5 LOMOLINO
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Illick 238 LOMOLINO

EFB 487 - Fisheries Science and Management (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to biology, ecology, quantitative assessments, conservation, and management of fish species targeted in fisheries. Includes models and empirical studies of population dynamics, life history theory, bioenergetics, population sampling, growth, mortality, production, exploitation, ecological effects, and approaches to fisheries management. A practicum (EFB 488) is optional. Fall.
Prerequisite: Calculus and either Limnology or Ichthyology or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 487 and EFB 687.

EFB 488 - Fisheries Science Practicum (1)

Three hours of laboratory per week with 2 weekend field trips. Practical experience in fisheries science, including introduction to collecting techniques, data collection, analysis, and use of models. A nominal fee is charged to defray costs on weekend trips. Designed as a complement to EFB 487. Fall, even years.
Co-requisite: EFB 487 (may be taken in a previous year).

EFB 493 - Wildlife Habitats and Populations (4)

Three hours of lecture/discussion and one three-hour laboratory per week; one Saturday field trip required. Application of ecological concepts, including succession and population biology to wildlife management planning and program assessment. Students are exposed to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service habitat evaluation procedures and fundamentals of population modeling. Fall.
Prerequisites: EFB 491 or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 493 and EFB 693.

  • (4) Section 01 - Wildlife Habitats & Populatns (#19606)
    View Textbook Information
      MWF 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker 148 COHEN
      M 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Baker 314 COHEN
  • (4) Section 02 - Wildlife Habitats & Populatns (#20618)
    View Textbook Information
      MWF 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker 148 COHEN
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Baker 314 COHEN

EFB 494 - Senior Synthesis in Forest Health (1)

One hour of discussion or seminar per week. This course integrates student internships (EFB 420) or research experiences (EFB 498) with broader issues in forest health through readings and discussions of current literature and oral presentations. Students present a 1 hr seminar that details their internship or research experiences during the previous summer, and that relates this work to prior coursework and current issues in forest health. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): EFB 420 or EFB 498

EFB 495 - Undergraduate Experience in College Teaching (1-3)

An opportunity for qualified, senior undergraduate students to gain experience in fully supervised, college-level teaching of the type they can expect to perform in graduate school. Students assist the instructor in the preparation and presentation of laboratory or recitation material in an undergraduate course. A maximum of 6 credit hours of EFB 495, and 3 credit hours relating to any single assisted course, may apply toward graduation requirements. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisites: Previous completion of the course being assisted (with a grade of B or higher), a GPA at ESF of 3.0 or higher, and permission of instructor.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

EFB 496 - Topics in Environmental and Forest Biology (1-3)

Experimental, interdisciplinary or special coursework in biology for undergraduate students. Subject matter and method of presentation varies from semester to semester. May be repeated for additional credit. Fall, Spring, Maymester or Summer. For sections taught during Maymester or summer session, appropriate tuition and fees apply in addition to travel and lodging costs.

EFB 497 - Seminar (1)

One hour of presentations and discussion per week. A topic in environmental and forest biology will be emphasized and its importance to contemporary issues will be addressed. Fall or Spring.

EFB 498 - Research Problems in Environmental and Forest Biology (1-5)

Independent research by advanced undergraduate student in topic related to environmental biology, conducted at SUNY-ESF or outside institution. EFB-based faculty member serves as studentís research sponsor; EFB-based faculty member or scientist at outside institution serves as research supervisor. Final written report to academic sponsor serves as basis for grade. Fall, Spring, Summer.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

EFB 504 - Plant-Herbivore Interactions (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introduction to major plant defensive strategies and counter-adaptation by herbivores. Costs and consequences of herbivory and evaluation of contemporary plant defense models. Direct and indirect linkage of plant-herbivore interactions with higher trophic levels, and effects on population and community dynamics. Plant-herbivore interactions and anthropogenic global change. Fall (Even years).
Prerequisite(s): Introductory courses in ecology and evolution.

EFB 512 - Introduction to Personal Environmental Interpretation Methods (3)

Two hours of lecture and 2 hours of recitation per week. One required Saturday field trip. Personal interpretation teaches a variety of face-to-face techniques used to connect the public with environmental science by providing an introduction to history of interpretation, popular interpretive and environmental education activities and curriculum, evaluation of programs, and lesson plans. Explores and illustrates the research and philosophy of environmental interpretation. Discuss interpretive research, plan and lead lectures, and mentor/evaluate undergraduates. Credit will not be granted for both EFB 312 and EFB 512. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or permission of instructor.

  • (3) Section 01 - Intro/Pers Env Interp Methods (#21361)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 10:35 am-11:30 am Illick 12 FOLTA
      M 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 12 FOLTA

EFB 525 - Limnology Practicum (2)

Three hours of field work or laboratory analysis each week. Two additional field trips on weekends; time outside of class devoted to an independent project. Students will become proficient in standard field and laboratory analyses used in limnology; field trips to diverse local aquatic habitats; development of an independent project. Fall.
Prerequisites: EFB 424, 624 or equivalent must be taken concurrently or previously.

EFB 551 - Forest Entomology (3)

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Diversity, ecology and integrated management of insect pests of forested ecosystems. Additional topics include invasive species, climate change and current research topics. Intended for students in Environmental and Forest Biology and Forest Resources Management. Fall, even years.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 351 and EFB 55l.

  • (3) Section 01 - Forest Entomology (#27582)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 11:40 am-12:35 pm Baker 148 TEALE
      M 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 117 TEALE
  • (3) Section 02 - Forest Entomology (#27583)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 11:40 am-12:35 pm Baker 148 TEALE
      Tu 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Illick 117 TEALE
  • (3) Section 03 - Forest Entomology (#27584)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 11:40 am-12:35 pm Baker 148 TEALE
      W 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 117 TEALE
  • (3) Section 04 - Forest Entomology (#27585)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 11:40 am-12:35 pm Baker 148 TEALE
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Illick 117 TEALE

EFB 554 - Aquatic Entomology (3)

Two hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory/field work per week and a weekend field trip. An introduction to the identification, life histories and ecology of aquatic insects, with emphasis on genera found in the Northeastern United States. Includes a consideration of the functional role of insects in aquatic systems, and current avenues of research. Intended for seniors and graduate students pursuing interests in entomology, fisheries and wildlife, forestry, limnology and general ecology. Fall.
Prerequisite: One course in entomology or permission of instructor.

  • (3) Section 01 - Aquatic Entomology (#20591)
    View Textbook Information
      WF 12:45 pm-2:05 pm Illick 112 RINGLER
      W 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 112 RINGLER

EFB 600 - Toxic Health Hazards (4)

Three hours of lecture and one hour discussion/seminar per week. Introduction to contemporary concepts of toxicology and to scientific basis for regulations and personal decisions about toxic health hazards. For students in natural or social sciences of environmental relevance. Topics include xenobiotic load, co-evolution of plant/animal defenses, chemical interactions, animal tests and risk assessment. Additional reading assignments and discussions. Fall.
Prerequisites: General biology and general chemistry. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 400 and EFB 600.

EFB 601 - Molecular Biology Techniques (4)

Two hours lecture and six hours laboratory per week. Theories behind techniques in molecular biology are introduced in lecture. Laboratory includes the extraction and quantification of genomic and plasmid DNA, agarose gel electrophoresis, restriction digestion, ligation, bacterial transformation, DNA sequencing and PCR. Additional topics in molecular biology are presented by the students. Fall.
Prerequisites: EFB 307, EFB 308, EFB 325 or equivalents. Note: Credit will not be granted for both BTC 401 and EFB 601.

  • (4) Section 01 - Molecular Biol Techniques (#20835)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:25 pm Marshall 212 NEWMAN,L
      WF 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Illick 424 NEWMAN,L

EFB 624 - Limnology: Study of Inland Waters (3)

Three hours of lecture per week, with additional hands-on activities during the semester. An introduction to the geology, physics, chemistry and biology of inland waters (lotic and lentic); effects of natural and anthropogenic perturbations are explored. Students develop a case study or exercise on a limnological issue. Fall.
Prerequisites: Introductory courses in physics, chemistry, and ecology, or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 424 and EFB 624.

EFB 626 - Plant Tissue Culture Methods (3)

Two hours of lecture and discussion and three hours of laboratory per week. Introduction to plant tissue culture for biotechnology research and as a propagation method. Emphasis will be on learning laboratory instrumentation and techniques for establishing cell cultures, producing transgenic cell lines, and regenerating whole plants. In addition to the scheduled lab exercises, an independent micropropagation or transformation project will be required. Fall.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for BTC 426 and FOR/EFB 626.

  • (3) Section 01 - Plant Tissue Culture Methods (#20565)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Marshall 110 MAYNARD
      Tu 12:30 pm-3:20 pm Marshall 217 MAYNARD
  • (3) Section 02 - Plant Tissue Culture Methods (#20659)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Marshall 110 MAYNARD
      W 12:45 pm-3:35 pm Marshall 217 MAYNARD
  • (3) Section 03 - Plant Tissue Culture Methods (#20660)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Marshall 110 MAYNARD
      Th 12:30 pm-3:20 pm Marshall 217 MAYNARD

EFB 627 - Plant Anatomy and Development (3)

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory instruction per week. This course offers a dynamic approach to the study of plant structure by understanding how cells, tissues and organs are formed using concepts and tools from genetics and molecular biology. Laboratory involves hands-on activities using current techniques. Students will give oral presentation on a topic relevant to the course. Fall.
Prerequisite: one year introductory biology. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 427 and EFB 627.

  • (3) Section 01 - Plant Anatomy & Development (#21352)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 10:35 am-11:30 am Illick 238 FERNANDO
      M 12:45 pm-3:35 pm Illick 424 FERNANDO
  • (3) Section 02 - Plant Anatomy & Development (#21353)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 10:35 am-11:30 am Illick 238 FERNANDO
      M 3:45 pm-6:35 pm Illick 424 FERNANDO

EFB 628 - Mycorrhizal Ecology (3)

Two hours of combined lecture/discussion and three hours of laboratory per week. Introduction to mycorrhizal symbioses, their role in plant nutrient uptake and function in plant community dynamics. Emphasis is on important historical and current literature, and on learning methodological approaches used in mycorrhizal research. Students will present and lead discussions on papers from the primary literature. An independent project is required. Fall, even years.
Prerequisites: General ecology or plant ecology, genetics. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 428 and EFB 628.

  • (3) Section 01 - Mycorrhizal Ecology (#27586)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 10:35 am-11:30 am Baker 432 HORTON
      F 9:30 am-12:30 pm Illick 306 HORTON

EFB 634 - Ecosystem Restoration Design (4)

A summer field course followed by a weekly seminar and workshop during the Fall. Will travel in Mesoamerica. Will examine degraded and restored ecosystems. Will travel on public transportation and stay in low-cost hostels. Will use contemporary problems as source material for course projects. Each student will work individually with the instructor to develop an approach to explore a novel research direction for ecosystem restoration. Continuation of restoration project project designs and analysis from the field trip will be part of the coursework after returning to Syracuse. The course will explore restoration strategies in many different ecosystems. Will consider restoration needs in less developed countries, and how that shapes design and evaluation. Course fee. Fall
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

EFB 635 - Flowering Plants: Diversity, Evolution, and Systematics (3)

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Diversity, evolution, and systematics of flowering plants with emphasis on flower structures and reproductive strategies. Flowering plant identification skills are built from examination of a broad diversity of species from major globally-distributed families with particular focus on flora of the Northeastern U.S. Students prepare professional presentations and lead discussion on current research issues in flowering plant diversity, evolution, and systematics. [Fall]
Prerequisite(s): General Biology I and II or permission of instructor.

  • (3) Section 01 - Flowering Plnts:Div,Evol&Systm (#21281)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 12:45 pm-1:40 pm Marshall 110 DOVCIAK
      F 12:45 pm-3:35 pm Illick 238 DOVCIAK

EFB 644 - Biogeography (4)

Three hours of lecture per week. Earth history (plate tectonics, etc.), topography and geographic variation in environmental conditions influence species and communities. Major geographic patterns in biological diversity and strategies for conserving native species are presented. Students design and conduct independent biogeographic study utilizing information available in the literature. Fall, even years.
Prerequisite: General ecology or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 444 and EFB 644.

EFB 653 - Parasitology (3)

Two hours of lecture/discussion per week, three hours laboratory per week. Diversity, ecology, and impact of parasites of ecological, medical, and veterinary importance. Emphasis on identification, life history, control, host-parasite interactions and evolution, population patterns, and parasite communities. Students write a review paper and present on a parasitic disease. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): One year of Introductory Biology, Ecology. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 453 and EFB 653.

  • (3) Section 01 - Parasitology (#21406)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 12:45 pm-1:40 pm Illick 238 WHIPPS
      F 12:45 pm-3:35 pm Illick 122 WHIPPS

EFB 662 - Animal Physiology: Environmental and Ecological (3)

Three hours of lecture, discussion and exercises per week, and an independent project. An introduction to the physiology of adaptation to the physical and biotic environments, including animal energetics, biology of body size, and physiological constraints on animal life history. Fall and Spring.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 462 and EFB 662.

  • (3) Section 01 - Animal Physiol:Envrn&Ecol (#20444)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 9:30 am-10:50 am TURNER
    Course meets online with 4 in-person exams a semester

EFB 681 - Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration and Enhancement (2)

One and three-quarter hours of lecture and discussion per week and three field experiences. Guiding principles for ecological restoration of freshwater aquatic ecosystems focusing on effects of nutrient loading, sedimentation, flow alteration, and habitat loss. Factors leading to loss of aquatic resources and effectiveness of techniques to restore habitat and fauna are analyzed. Student presentation of a relevant topic and field excursions to perturbed areas and recent restoration projects are required. Fall, odd years.
Prerequisites: none. Directed toward graduate students in areas involving aquatic sciences and management.

EFB 687 - Fisheries Science and Management (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to the biology, ecology, quantitative assessments, conservation, and management of fish species targeted in fisheries. Includes models and empirical studies of population dynamics, life history theory, population growth, mortality, production, exploitation, and management. Critical synthesis project required. Fall.
Prerequisites: Calculus and either Limnology or Ichthyology or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 487 and EFB 687.

EFB 693 - Wildlife Habitats and Populations (4)

Three hours of lecture/discussion and one three-hour laboratory per week; one Saturday field trip required. Application of ecological concepts including succession and population biology to wildlife management planning and program assessment. Students are exposed to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service habitat evaluation procedures and fundamentals of population modeling. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both EFB 493 and EFB 693.

  • (4) Section 01 - Wildlife Habitats & Populatns (#19621)
    View Textbook Information
      MWF 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker 148 COHEN
      M 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Baker 314 COHEN
  • (4) Section 02 - Mgt Wildlife Habitat&Pop (#20619)
    View Textbook Information
      MWF 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker 148 COHEN
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Baker 314 COHEN

EFB 796 - Topics in Environmental and Forest Biology (1-3)

Special instruction, conference, advanced study, and research in selected subject areas. A written report required. Check Schedule of Courses for details. Fall and Spring.

  • (3) Section 01 - Evaluation/Envrn Education (#21130)
    View Textbook Information
      TBA Day TBA FOLTA
  • (1) Section 05 - Plant Physiology Recitation II (#21283)
    View Textbook Information
      Tu 9:30 am-10:25 am Illick 334 NEWMAN,L
  • (3) Section 08 - Grow What You Eat (#27626)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Illick 530 ETTINGER
      F 8:00 am-11:00 am Illick 530 ETTINGER
  • (3) Section 10 - Human-Wildlife Conflict (#21407)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 9:30 am-10:50 am Bray 300 FOLTA,J
  • (1-3) Section 16 - Intro to WinBUGS for Ecologsts (#21305)
    View Textbook Information
      Th 12:30 pm-3:20 pm Baker 437 COHEN
    Professor consent is required to register for this section.
  • (1) Section 20 - Wldlfe Habitats&Pops:Class Prj (#21314)
    View Textbook Information
      TBA Day TBA COHEN
    Preq: EFB 493 or EFB 693
  • (3) Section 27 - Quantitative Meth&Models in R (#21370)
    View Textbook Information
      Tu 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Bray 313 FRAIR
    Preq:Grad-level stats classes. Students should be in at least the 2nd yr of prog & have their own data set to analyze
    Professor consent is required to register for this section.
      Tu 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Bray 313 STELLA

EFB 797 - Seminar in Environmental and Forest Biology (1)

Seminar discussions of subjects of interest and importance in environmental and forest biology. Seminar offerings are available in most subdisciplinary areas. Check Schedule of Courses for details. Fall and Spring.

  • (1) Section 01 - Adaptive Peaks Grad Seminar (#20558)
    View Textbook Information
      Th 3:30 pm-4:50 pm Illick 5 FARRELL,S
      Th 3:30 pm-4:50 pm Illick 5 PATERSON
      Th 3:30 pm-4:50 pm Illick 12 FARRELL,S
      Th 3:30 pm-4:50 pm Illick 12 PATERSON
  • (1) Section 03 - Foraging Behavior & Ecology (#27616)
    View Textbook Information
      F 2:15 pm-3:05 pm Illick 334 FRAIR
  • (1) Section 06 - Visitor Eductn/Wldlfe Mgt Tool (#27665)
    View Textbook Information
      TBA Day TBA FOLTA
      TBA Day TBA FOLTA,J
  • (1) Section 07 - Traditional Ecological Knowldg (#27696)
    View Textbook Information
      TBA Day TBA PATTERSON
  • (1) Section 08 - Seminar on College Teaching (#28000)
    View Textbook Information
      M 3:00 pm-4:00 pm 237 SPUCHES
  • (1) Section 10 - Impcts,Mgt&Mit/Emrng Tree Dis (#28075)
    View Textbook Information
      TBA Day TBA POWELL
  • (1) Section 20 - EFB Core Course (#21316)
    View Textbook Information
      Tu 3:30 pm-4:30 pm Illick 334 FIERKE

EFB 798 - Research Problems in Environmental and Forest Biology (1-12)

Individual advanced study of selected special problems in environmental and forest biology. Offered by arrangement with individual faculty. A written report required. Fall and Spring.

EFB 898 - Professional Experience (1-12)

Professional experience which applies, enriches and/or complements formal coursework. Graded on an "S/U" basis. Fall, Spring and Summer.

EFB 899 - Masterís Thesis or Project Research (1-12)

Investigation leading to the completion of a research-oriented thesis or to an application-oriented project. Graded on an "S/U" basis. Fall, Spring and Summer.

EFB 999 - Doctoral Thesis Research (1-12)

Investigation leading to the completion of the doctoral thesis. Graded on an "S/U" basis. Fall, Spring and Summer.

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EHS

EHS 250 - Foundations of Environmental Health (1)

One hour of lecture/discussion per week. Introduction to environmental health concepts. Course will introduce students to environmental risk, epidemiology, toxicology, policy, and regulation; agents of disease and human health risks including vector-borne pathogens, toxic metals, pesticides, and radiation. Course will also cover applications of environmental health with a focus on water and air quality, food safety, waste management and occupational health. Fall
Prerequisites: One year each of Biology with lab (EFB 101 and 102, EFB 103 and 104), General Chemistry with lab (FCH 150 and 151, FCH 152 and 153) and Calculus (APM 105 and 106).

EHS 420 - Professional Internship in Environmental Health (1-5)

40 hours of work with the sponsor per credit. Full or part time position as an employee or volunteer in a profession setting with an environmental health focus. Internship will be structured in collaboration between ESF faculty advisor and on-site supervisor. Requires a plan outlining learning goals and objectives, weekly record of activities, supervisors assessment and final report by student. Fall, Spring, Summer

EHS 480 - Hazardous Waste Management (3)

Three 50 minute lectures per week. In-depth examination of hazardous wastes from source to disposal and chemical fate; covers medical, nuclear, industrial sources and reduction, prevention, containment, transportation, remediation. History, risk assessment, regulation and safety are included. Fall.
Credit will not be granted for both EHS 680 and EHS 480 Pre and co-requisite(s): Pre or co-requisite of EHS250 and prerequisite of one year of Organic Chemistry (FCH 221/222 and 223/224 or equivalent)

EHS 680 - Hazardous Waste Management (4)

Three 50 minute lectures per week plus a one hour recitation. In-depth examination of hazardous wastes from source to disposal and chemical fate; covers medical, nuclear, industrial sources and reduction, prevention, containment, transportation, remediation. History, risk assessment, regulation and safety are included. Fall
Permission of instructor required. Credit will not be granted for both EHS 680 and EHS 480
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

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ENS

ENS 132 - Orientation Seminar: Environmental Science (1)

One hour of lecture or discussion each week. Introduction to campus facilities, personnel, lower-division curriculum, and upper-division study options within the Environmental Science program. Fall.

  • (1) Section 01 - Orientation Seminar:EnvSci (#21113)
    View Textbook Information
      W 5:15 pm-6:10 pm Baker 145 BRIGGS
      W 5:15 pm-6:10 pm Baker 145 MOORE
  • (1) Section 02 - Orientation Seminar:EnvSci (#27783)
    View Textbook Information
      W 5:15 pm-6:05 pm TBA RTBA NEWMAN,L
      W 5:15 pm-6:05 pm TBA RTBA MOORE

ENS 470 - Environmental Risk Assessment (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Identification of environmental hazards to human and other life forms; application of statistical tools and methods required for quantifying risk and their applicability and limitations; regulatory requirements governing risk assessment reporting; and effective public communication of environmental risks. Fall.
Prerequisite: APM 106, APM 391, EFB 103, FCH 152

  • (3) Section 01 - Environmental Risk Assessment (#21440)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Baker 432 PATERSON

ENS 494 - Environmental Science Capstone (1)

1 hour of lecture/discussion per week. Support and instruction for completion and presentation of the senior synthesis project for Environmental Science. Topics include research skills and literature review, data analysis, scientific writing including editing, and oral presentation. Research or internship must be nearly or fully completed.

  • (1) Section 01 - Capstone Seminar (#21176)
    View Textbook Information
      W 10:35 am-11:30 am Baker 141 BRIGGS
      W 10:35 am-11:30 am Baker 141 MOORE

ENS 496 - Spec Topics/Envrnmntl Science (1-3)


ENS 498 - Research Problems in Environmental Science (1-5)

Independent research in topics in environmental science for undergraduate students. Selection of subject area determined by the student in conjunction with an appropriate faculty member. Tutorial conferences, discussions and critiques scheduled as necessary. Final written report required for departmental record. Fall, Spring and/or Summer.
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

ENS 798 - Problems in Environmental Science and Policy (1-12)

Individualized, special study of environmental science and policy subjects and issues. Comprehensive oral or written report required for some problems. Fall, Spring and Summer.

ENS 898 - Professional Experience (1-12)

Professional experience which applies, enriches and/or complements formal coursework. Graded on an "S/U" basis. Fall, Spring and Summer.

ENS 899 - Masterís Thesis Research (1-12)

Research and independent study for the masterís degree and thesis. Fall, Spring and Summer.

ENS 999 - Doctoral Thesis Research (1-12)

Research and independent study for the doctoral degree and dissertation. Fall, Spring and Summer.

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ERE

ERE 132 - Introduction to Environmental Resources Engineering (1)

Three hours of lab per week. Introduction to department and campus resources available to ensure academic success for ERE majors. Introduction to engineering science and design as a profession through readings, assignments, presentations, discussion, and field trips. Fall.

ERE 335 - Numerical and Computing Methods (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introduction to numerical and computing methods for engineers. Writing computer code to analyze and solve engineering problems using state-of-the-art software packages. Fall.
Prerequisite: MAT 485.

ERE 339 - Fluid Mechanics (4)

Three hours of lecture per week plus one lab session. An introduction to fluid mechanics within the context of civil and environmental engineering. This includes hydrostatics, Bernoulliís Equation, control volume analysis, drag, dynamic similitude, pipe flow, and open channel flow with some brief coverage of hydraulic machines and flow in porous media. Fall.
Prerequisites: APM206 and GNE172 or equivalents

  • (4) Section 01 - Fluid Mechanics (#21333)
    View Textbook Information
      MWF 10:35 am-11:30 am Bray 313 SHAW,S
      M 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Marshall 319 SHAW,S

ERE 371 - Surveying for Engineers (3)

Two hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. The principles of plane surveying and position determination for engineers. Subject matter areas include introduction to the theory of measurement and errors, reference surfaces, coordinate systems and datums, horizontal and vertical measurements, traversing and computations, the analysis and treatment of systematic and random errors, foundations of global positioning systems. Laboratory fieldwork and computations culminate in a topographic map. Fall.
Prerequisite: Calculus.

  • (3) Section 01 - Surveying For Engineers (#19707)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker 145 QUACKENBUSH
    Construction Management students only or permission of instructor
      M 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Baker 105 QUACKENBUSH
  • (3) Section 02 - Surveying For Engineers (#19708)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker 145 QUACKENBUSH
    ERE or Env. Science students only or permission of instructor
      Tu 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Baker 105 QUACKENBUSH
  • (3) Section 03 - Surveying For Engineers (#20617)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker 145 QUACKENBUSH
    ERE or Env. Science students only or permission of instructor
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Baker 105 QUACKENBUSH

ERE 412 - River Form and Process (3)

Three hours of lecture per week including river field sites. Field-based data collection methods for river classification. Bankfull flow estimates. Classified river form, suggested evolution sequences and governing fluvial processes. Computational river hydraulics, sediment transport, and issues of channel stability and restoration. Fall.
Prerequisites: ERE340, ERE371, APM395. Note: Credit will not be granted for both ERE 412 and ERE 612.

  • (3) Section 01 - River Form and Process (#21131)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker 432 ENDRENY
      Tu 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Baker 434 ENDRENY

ERE 468 - Solid and Hazardous Waste Engineering (3)

Three hours of lecture and discussion. Introduction to solid and hazardous waste regulations. Analysis and design of solid and hazardous waste management systems, including generation, storage, transport, recycling, biological, physical, chemical and thermal treatment; energy recovery; land disposal; environmental protection systems and monitoring. Field trips. Fall.
Pre- or Co-requisites: ERE 340 and ERE 440. Note: Credit will not be granted for both ERE 468 and ERE 568.

ERE 480 - Fate and Transport of Contaminants in Environmental Systems (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Content covers the movement and reactions associated with contaminants released into environmental systems. The concepts will be applied in a field trip and review of the design, construction and operation of a constructed wetland used in the tertiary treatment of municipal wastewater. Fall.
Prerequisites: General Chemistry I and II, Calculus I and II and Ecological Engineering or equivalent.

  • (3) Section 01 - Fate&Trsprt/Contamnts/Env Sys (#21489)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Baker 159 MURPHY,C

ERE 488 - Engineering Project Management (1)

Project management strategies for the engineering profession. Readings, exercises and discussion emphasizing professional responsibility and ethical practices; project management; technical communication and teamwork. Team-based scoping and planning of engineering design projects. Fall.
Prerequisite: Senior status ERE students only.

ERE 496 - Special Topics (1-3)

Lectures, readings, problems and discussions. Topics in environmental or resource engineering as announced. Fall and/or Spring.

ERE 498 - Research Problem in Environmental Resources Engineering (1-3)

Independent research in topics in environmental resources engineering for the highly motivated undergraduate student. Selection of subject area determined by the student in conference with appropriate faculty member. Tutorial conferences, discussions and critiques scheduled as necessary. Fall, Spring.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

ERE 527 - Stormwater Management (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. One Saturday field trip. Techniques for urban stormwater and erosion control and analysis of associated water quality impacts. Review of applicable regulations and design standards. Students will engage in individual and team-oriented activities such as lecture, discussion, observation, computation, reading and writing. In addition, students are required to participate in a Saturday field trip where examples of stormwater management facilities will be reviewed. Students will, in small teams, generate a design for a stormwater management alternative at a local site. Fall.
Prerequisite: FEG 340 or equivalent as determined by instructor.

ERE 530 - Numerical and Computing Methods (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Programming skills and computing techniques using state-of-the-art software packages. Applications of programming and computing methods for solving geospatial, ecological, and/or water resource engineering problems. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): Differential Equations.

ERE 545 - Environmental Soil Physics (3)

2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab per week. Soil water content and potential, steady water flow in saturated soil, heat flow in soil, transient water flow. Field methods to obtain data for analysis and modeling. Application of analytical and numerical solutions to describe heat and water fluxes in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum, unsaturated zone hydrology, and solute transport. Fall.
Prerequisite: PHY 211, APM 485, ERE 339, or equivalent

  • (3) Section 01 - Environmental Soil Physics (#27593)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:00 am-9:20 am Baker 432 DALEY
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Baker 434 DALEY

ERE 551 - GIS for Engineers (3)

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Introduction to fundamental concepts in geographic information systems (GISs) with a focus on engineering applications. Fundamental concepts and development of geographic information systems including models and georeferencing systems used to represent and characterize spatial data. Data processing including collection and preprocessing, data management, spatial analysis and manipulation, and data output. Necessity and utility of spatial data in engineering design analysis. Fall.
Prerequisite: Calculus. Co-requisite: ERE 371 or equivalent.

  • (3) Section 01 - GIS for Engineers (#20761)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 11:40 am-12:35 pm Bray 313 QUACKENBUSH
      W 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Baker 309 QUACKENBUSH

ERE 553 - Introduction to Spatial Information (1)

Three hours of lecture per week for the first third of the semester. An introduction to spatial terminology and methods for determining and expressing position. Examination of accuracy and precision in the context of horizontal measurements. Issues with subsequent use of measurements for producing maps and performing analysis. Fall.

  • (1) Section 01 - Intro to Spatial Information (#20924)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker 145 QUACKENBUSH
    Meets first half of semester

ERE 568 - Solid and Hazardous Waste Engineering (3)

Three hours of lecture and discussion. Introduction to solid and hazardous waste regulations. Analysis and design of solid and hazardous waste management systems, including generation, storage, transport, recycling, biological, physical, chemical and thermal treatment; energy recovery; land disposal; environmental protection systems and monitoring. Field trips. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both ERE 468 and ERE 568.

ERE 612 - River Form and Process (3)

Three hours of lecture per week including river field sites. Field-based data collection methods for river classification. Bankfull flow estimates. Classified river form, suggested evolution sequences and governing fluvial processes. Computational river hydraulics, sediment transport, and issues of channel stability and restoration. Fall.
Prerequisites: Engineering Hydrology and Hydraulics, Engineering Probability and Statistics. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FEG 412 and ERE 612.

  • (3) Section 01 - River Form and Process (#21137)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker 432 ENDRENY
      Tu 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Baker 434 ENDRENY

ERE 621 - Spatial Analysis (3)

Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Spatial statistics and modeling as applied to various data formats: single point data, continuous data and area data. First and second order effects, complete spatial randomness, tessellation, kernel, covariograms and variograms, kriging, distance measures, correlation/correlogram. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): APM391, FEG335 or permission of instructor.

ERE 798 - Research in Environmental and Resource Engineering (1-12)

Independent research topics in Environmental Resources Engineering. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

ERE 898 - Professional Experience/Synthesis (1-6)

A supervised, documented professional work experience in the Master of Professional Studies degree program. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Prerequisite: Approval of proposed study plan by advisor, Department, and any sponsoring organization.

ERE 899 - Masterís Thesis Research (1-12)

Research and independent study for the masterís degree and thesis. Fall, Spring and Summer.

ERE 999 - Doctoral Thesis Research (1-12)

Research and independent study for the doctoral degree and dissertation. Fall, Spring and Summer.

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ESF

ESF 109 - Honors Seminar in Environmental Science and Forestry (1)

One hour of lecture/discussion per week. Sequential presentations by ESF faculty and staff members. Exploration of science, engineering, design, management and social science applied to regional, national and global issues. A written report and presentation is required. Fall.
Prerequisite: Admission to the lower division Honors Program.

ESF 132 - Seminar/New Students (1)


ESF 200 - Information Literacy (1)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week for five weeks. Introductory course for students of all levels and all curricula to the basic research process for information retrieval and management. Emphasis on electronic bibliographic and Internet research tools. Fall and Spring.

ESF 209 - Honors Seminar in Environmental Science and Forestry (1)

One hour of presentation and discussion per week. Sequential presentations by students, or faculty, or both. Exploration of science, engineering, design, management and/or social science applied to regional, national and global environmental issues. A presentation and/or a written report may be required. Fall.
Prerequisite: Admission to the lower division Honors Program.

ESF 296 - Spec Topics/Envrn Sci & Fsty (1-3)


ESF 300 - Introduction to Geospatial Information Technologies (3)

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. A theoretical and practical course providing an introduction to the uses and limitations of geospatial information technologies, including geographic information systems (GIS), global positioning systems (GPS) and remote sensing, for environmental science and natural resources management applications. Fall and Spring.

  • (3) Section 01 - Intro/Geospatial Info Tech (#20663)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 11:40 am-12:35 pm Illick 5 STORRINGS,M
      W 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Baker 314 STORRINGS,M
  • (3) Section 02 - Intro/Geospatial Info Tech (#20664)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 11:40 am-12:35 pm Illick 5 STORRINGS,M
      W 5:15 pm-8:05 pm Baker 314 STORRINGS,M
  • (3) Section 03 - Intro/Geospatial Info Tech (#20665)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 11:40 am-12:35 pm Illick 5 STORRINGS,M
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Baker 310 STORRINGS,M
  • (3) Section 04 - Intro/Geospatial Info Tech (#20838)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 11:40 am-12:35 pm Illick 5 STORRINGS,M
      F 12:45 pm-3:35 pm Baker 437 STORRINGS,M

ESF 499 - Honors Thesis/Project (1-5)

Guided independent study in a topic related to the student's undergraduate major, resulting in a thesis/project. Students will give an honors presentation of their work. Fall and Spring.

ESF 797 - Graduate Seminar on Information Resources (1)

One hour of lecture/discussion per week. Searching for and evaluating information resources. Using citation management software. Preparing to write the research proposal and write and defend subsequent thesis/dissertation. Student presentations on information tools, thesis/dissertation research topics, formation of problem statement. Spring.

  • (1) Section 01 - Grad Seminar on Info Resources (#21330)
    View Textbook Information
      M 3:45 pm-4:45 pm Moon 110 ELLIS
      M 3:45 pm-4:45 pm Moon 110 CLEMONS

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EST

EST 132 - Introduction to Environmental Studies (3)

Three hours of lecture, discussion and analytical activities per week. Gateway course for EST majors. Introduction to the study of environmental problems in the social sciences and humanities. Topics: pollution, conservation, preservation, human health, ecosystem health, limits to growth, sustainability, ecosystems, population, energy, risk and traditional knowledge. Fall.

EST 200 - Cultural Ecology (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion/oral presentations per week. Students develop skills and fluency in preparing, delivering and evaluating multicultural and traditional environmental management and decision-making. Emphasis is on situations encountered in the environmental professions. Case studies pose ethical questions, which challenge students to apply theory and analysis to each case. Topics also include interactions of culture and environment, relationship between traditional and scientific knowledge and co-management as multicultural decision making. Self-evaluation and peer evaluations are emphasized. Fall or Spring.

  • (3) Section 02 - Cultural Ecology (#20579)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 10:35 am-11:30 am Marshall 319 KEENAN
      F 10:35 am-11:30 am Marshall 319 KEENAN
  • (3) Section 03 - Cultural Ecology (#20637)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 10:35 am-11:30 am Marshall 319 KEENAN
      F 11:40 am-12:35 pm Marshall 319 KEENAN

EST 220 - Urban Ecology (3)

Two hours lecture/discussion, three hours of outdoor laboratory per week. Explores the city from an ecosystems perspective. Addresses the role and importance of science, engineering, the design professions, and community participation in creating livable communities. Environmental equity and justice are addressed. Fall.

  • (3) Section 01 - Urban Ecology (#20488)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 11:40 am-12:35 pm Baker 141 STAFF
      M 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Baker 141 STAFF

EST 221 - Introduction to American Government (3)

Three contact hours per week. Describes American political system and its roles and functions in society. Examines how political processes change over time, including the role of rhetoric and argumentation in policy development. Explores critical analysis of political phenomena. Fall.

EST 245 - Foundations of Environmental Communication (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Survey of environmental communication, including nature representions in popular culture, and the role of mass media on public perceptions of environmental issues. Topics also include strategic communication, public participation in environmental decision-making, and environmental risk perception. Exposure to communication theory and social scientific and humanities-based approaches. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): none.

  • (3) Section 01 - Foundations/Envrn Communicatn (#20536)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:00 am-9:20 am Marshall 319 BETHUREM

EST 296 - Special Topics in Environmental Studies (1-3)

Experimental, interdisciplinary or special coursework at the freshman or sophomore levels. Subject matter and course format vary from semester to semester or offering on the basis of needs and objectives of the course. Fall or Spring.

EST 361 - History of the American Environmental Movement (3)

Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. The historic and cultural origins and evolution of this complex, multifaceted social phenomenon called the environmental movement and its influence on public policies, values and lifestyles. The events, personages, philosophies and historical/cultural processes that marked and continue to drive various, competing attitudes toward nature, even within the United States environmental movement. Fall.

  • (3) Section 01 - History/Am Envrn Movement (#19736)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 2:00 pm-3:20 pm Baker 148 SONNENFELD
    Preq: Sophomore status or consent of the instructor

EST 366 - Attitudes, Values and the Environment (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Historical roots of environmental attitudes, values, and ethics with special emphasis on how individual attitudes impact environmental issues. Perspectives on man's relationship and responsibility to nature. Value implications of ecological principles and concepts. Examples of current environmental issues are examined in this context. Fall, even years.
Prerequisites: Junior status or permission of instructor.

EST 400 - Senior Paper (3)

Individual study of an environmental topic resulting in a formal report that meets the requirements for an environmental studies synthesis experience. These requirements are identified in course meetings. Enrollment is restricted to environmental studies seniors. Fall and Spring.

EST 401 - Environmental Ethics and Culture: Perspectives on the Adirondack Park (3)

Introduction to the ethics of land-use conflicts in the Adirondacks, NY. This course links the philosophical history of ethics with contemporary principles of environmental ethics and advocacy. Topics include agency, ethics, value theory, morality and responsibility in the context of ongoing regional debates. Requires concurrent registration with other Sustaining the Park courses. Fall, Newcomb Campus.
Prerequisite(s): none. Co-requisites: EFB 411, EST 402, EST 403, EST 404.

  • (3) Section 01 - Envrn Ethics&Culture/ADK Park (#21294)
    View Textbook Information
      W Day TBA PATINELLI-DU
    Adirondack Residential Semester

EST 402 - Diverse Perspectives on a common landscape: Experiencing the Adirondack Park (3)

Two hours of lecture and three hours per week of immersion in Adirondack issues including introduction to diverse stakeholders and perspectives through non-governmental, agency, and community meetings; interaction with an array of regional experts through special panel discussions; and field trips to and private tours of historic and cultural sites and institutions. Requires concurrent registration with other Sustaining the Park courses. Fall, Newcomb Campus.
Prerequisite(s): none. Co-requisites: EFB 411, EST 401, EST 403, EST 404.

  • (3) Section 01 - Divrs Perspctvs:Experience ADK (#21295)
    View Textbook Information
      F Day TBA HAI
    Adirondack Residential Semester

EST 403 - Sustainable Development: An Adirondack Park Case Study (3)

A place based study of the concepts of sustainable development and their application. Students will learn of the role of historical precedence and current context in approaching planning and policy for a sustainable future. The course will combine lecture, discussion, student led seminars and writing that illustrates both skills in analysis and synthesis. Class will meet once a week for three hours for fourteen weeks at the ESF Newcomb campus, and may require occasional field trips. Requires concurrent registration with other Sustaining the Park courses. Fall, Newcomb Campus.
Prerequisites: none. Co-requisites: EFB 411, EST 401, EST 402, EST 404.

  • (3) Section 01 - Sustainable Devl:ADK Park Stdy (#21296)
    View Textbook Information
      MW Day TBA WHALEY
    Adirondack Residential Semester

EST 404 - Using Past Exp. to Inform Future Managmt: Synthesizing the Adirondack Park (3)

Three hours of lecture/seminar/discussion per week. Synthesis of experiences, content and insights gained during the ďSustaining the Adirondack ParkĒ residential semester, including Capstone research and production of an independent position paper and collaborative comprehensive management plan. Requires concurrent registration with other Sustaining the Park courses. Fall, Newcomb Campus.
Prerequisite(s): none. Co-requisites: EFB 411, EST 401, EST 402, EST 403.

  • (3) Section 01 - Past Exp/Synthesizing ADK Park (#21297)
    View Textbook Information
      M Day TBA HAI
    Adirondack Residential Semester

EST 426 - Community Planning and Sustainability (3)

Three hours of lecture and demonstration per week. Presents ecological planning and development concepts and theory guiding local and global initiatives for sustainable development. Overlapping themes are considered and linked: the relationship between landscape patterns reflecting wealth, poverty and environmental quality; the role of efficiency in reducing environmental impacts; and the questions of environmental equality, and the quality of development. Fall.

  • (3) Section 01 - Community Plng&Sustainability (#20605)
    View Textbook Information
      MWF 12:45 pm-1:40 pm Marshall 111 MARSHALL,W
      MWF 12:45 pm-1:40 pm Marshall 111 LICHTENSTEIN

EST 450 - Sustainable Enterprise (3)

Three hours of classroom/presentation per week. Economic, social, and environmental dimensions of sustainability and their interdependence. Influences on organizations to adopt sustainable approaches to operations and activities. Tools to validate organizational sustainability. Transdisciplinary emphasis. Fall.
Note: This course is cross-listed at SU School of Management as LPP/SHR 450.

EST 493 - Environmental Communication Workshop (3)

Three hours of cooperative learning activities, lecture and discussion per week. A workshop format on a specified environmental program or issue introduces the theories and skills of alternative dispute resolution approaches, public participation structures and dynamics, public policy decision making and implementation, risk communication, leadership styles, and small group dynamics. Spring.
Prerequisite: Senior status or permission of instructor.

EST 495 - Selected Readings in Environmental Studies (1-3)

An in-depth and independent exploration of selected readings from the environmentally related literature. Emphasis is placed on gaining insights and understanding from the readings, rather than producing an extensive bibliography. Fall, Spring and Summer.
Prerequisite: Approval of study plan by instructor.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

EST 496 - Special Topics in Environmental Studies (1-3)

Special topics of current interest to undergraduate students in environmental studies and related fields. A detailed course subject description will be presented as the topic area is identified and developed. Fall, Spring and Summer.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

EST 498 - Introductory Research Problems (1-3)

Guided individual study of an environmental topic. Emphasis is on the study procedure and the methods employed. Enrollment is possible at various times during the semester. Fall, Spring and Summer.
Prerequisite: Approval of study plan by instructor.

EST 499 - Environmental Studies Internship (1-12)

Internships provide students with a supervised field experience to apply and extend their academic abilities in a professional working environment. Enrollment is possible at various times during the semester. Fall, Spring and Summer.
Prerequisites: Environmental Studies senior status and written approval of an internship contract by major professor, curriculum director and field supervisor.

EST 600 - Foundations of Environmental Studies (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Examines frameworks for understanding and solving environmental problems. Familiarizes students with the epistemological foundations of environment-society relations. Considers multiple methodological and analytical strategies. Uses a case study method to exemplify key principles. Fall.
Prerequisites: Undergraduate courses in general ecology, environmental science and policy or communication theory.

EST 603 - Research Methods and Design (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Comprehensive survey of research methods and design for Environmental Studies. Topics covered include the scientific method; research design; quantitative, qualitative, and mixed research methods; sampling; data collection techniques; data analysis and interpretation; research ethics; and research proposal development. Fall.

EST 608 - Environmental Advocacy Campaigns and Conflict Resolution (3)

Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Addresses complex dynamics, strategies, and tactics of 1) organized campaigns by grassroots to international organizations to advocate for particular environmental policy and 2) processes that seek to resolve, manage, or prevent environmental conflicts when appropriate. Readings, simulations, projects, and case study analysis. Fall.

EST 640 - Environmental Thought and Ethics (3)

Three hours of discussion per week. Critical interdisciplinary introduction to philosophical, religious, cultural and historical dimensions of environmental affairs. How ecologically significant cultural assumptions, ideologies, representations, and institutionalized practices contribute to human meanings and relationships to other-than-human-nature. Special attention to the role of language and questions of environmental ethics and ontology. Fall.

  • (3) Section 01 - Envrn Thought and Ethics (#27594)
    View Textbook Information
      Tu 5:00 pm-7:50 pm Marshall 319 HIRSCH
    This course will be taught in a hybrid format. Please contact the instructor for details.

EST 645 - Mass Media and Environmental Affairs (3)

Three hours of discussion per week. Introduces the mass mediaís role in environmental affairs. Relationships between media organizations, technology, content, and audiences frame examination of how nature and environmental issues and problems are engaged by the media and with what consequences. News and current affairs, advertising and entertainment genres are considered. Fall.

EST 695 - Environmental Journalism (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. This course covers a range of topics related to journalism: interviewing, writing the lead, style, writing and organizing the story, layout, editing and revising, writing features and follow-up stories, covering speeches, etc. In addition, students explore how the media covers scientific and environmental issues. Students work on writing skills--from basic editing techniques to more sophisticated areas of style. Spring.

EST 696 - Special Topics in Environmental Studies (1-3)

One to three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Experimental and developmental courses in new areas of interest to environmental studies faculty and graduate students not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Fall and Spring.

  • (3-4) Section 01 - Int'l Env Policy Consultancy (#21269)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:00 am-9:20 am Baker 141 SONNENFELD
    Professor consent is required to register for this section.
  • (3) Section 03 - Nature, Recreation and Society (#27799)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:00 am-9:20 am Marshall 105 VIDON
  • (3) Section 04 - Environmental Justice (#27923)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 12:45 pm-2:05 pm Marshall 105 STAFF

EST 705 - Environmental Policy Analysis (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. This course covers current and classic literature in environmental policy analysis, as well as a variety of approaches to policy analysis that are relevant for working through complex environmental issues. While tools and methods for policy analysis will be treated, the overall intention of the course is to provide students with the scholarly background to think analytically, critically, and creatively across a variety of environmental policy contexts. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): A graduate-level course in environmental policy.

  • (3) Section 01 - Environmental Policy Analysis (#21349)
    View Textbook Information
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Marshall 212 HIRSCH
    This course will be taught in a hybrid format. Please contact the instructor for details.

EST 797 - Environmental Studies Seminar (1-3)

One to three hours of classroom instruction/discussion per week. Discussion of current topics and research related to environmental studies. Fall and Spring.

EST 798 - Problems in Environmental Studies (1-3)

One to three hours of supervised individual activity per week. Individualized, special study of environmental studies subjects and issues. Comprehensive oral or written report required for some problems. Fall, Spring and Summer.

EST 898 - Professional Experience (1-12)

Variable number of hours of professional experience per week. Professional experience which applies, enriches and/or complements formal coursework. Graded on an ďS/UĒ basis. Fall, Spring, and Summer.

EST 899 - Masterís Thesis Research (1-12)

One to 12 hours of supervised individual activity per week. Research and independent study for the masterís degree and thesis. Fall, Spring, and Summer.

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EWP

EWP 190 - Writing and the Environment (3)

Three hours of lecture, discussion, and workshops per week. Introduction to academic writing, reading, and research, reflecting college-level literacy skills of analysis, argument, and critical thinking. The course includes frequent informal writing assignments and three formal writing projects requiring revision. An oral presentation is required. Fall.

EWP 220 - Public Presentation Skills (2-3)

Development of skills and fluency needed by environmental professionals in preparing,delivering and evaluating effectiveness of expository and persuasive oral presentations. Communication theory, rhetorical analysis, and visualizations of complex and technical data, self and peer evaluation, listening skills. Fall/Spring

EWP 300 - Survey of Environmental Writing (3)

Three hours of classroom instruction per week. Students will explore forms of environmental writing including but not limited to journalism, poetry, memoir, field notes, historical research, natural histories and polemics. Students will analyze these writings rhetorically and create a range of texts including creative pieces, factually-based reporting, nature writing, and writing about science. Fall/Spring.
Prerequisites: EWP 190 and EWP 290.

  • (3) Section 02 - Survey/Environmental Writing (#21103)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 3:30 pm-4:50 pm Marshall 319 FITZSIMMONS

EWP 350 - Eco-Cinema: Perspectives & Practices (Honors) (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion and two-hour film screening each week. Environmental films are interpreted from cultural, historical, and political perspectives. The artistic process in filmmaking is emphasized. Students produce a short film or slide show with an environmental theme. Spring.
Prerequisites: EWP 190 and EWP 290 or Equivalent; Enrollment in Honors Program.

EWP 390 - Literature of Nature (3)

Three hours of discussion and lecture per week. Examination of views of nature and the environment as seen through works of 19th and 20th century writers, poets, and essayists. Readings, discussions, and written assignments explore aesthetics, socio-political climate, and prevailing attitudes toward the environment that formed the backdrop for readings. Fall and Spring.

EWP 401 - Capstone Experience (3)

Experiential learning for the Environmental Writing & Rhetoric (EWR) minor through a writing project based on a) a community-based internship b) tutoring or completing special project in the Writing Resource Center, or c) an independent creative writing project. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisites: Student must be registered for the EWR minor.

EWP 407 - Writing for Environmental & Science Professionals (3)

Three hours of lecture, discussion, and workshops per week. Focuses on principles and practice of writing skills required of environmental and science professionals. Emphasizes proficiency in determining purpose of a document; analyzing audience; selecting, developing and organizing information in an appropriate design; and writing clearly, precisely, and effectively. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite: EWP 290 and junior or senior status

  • (3) Section 02 - Writing/Env & Sci Professionls (#21338)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 5:00 pm-6:20 pm Bray 321 FITZSIMMONS
  • (3) Section 04 - Writing/Env & Sci Professionls (#21339)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 3:45 pm-5:05 pm Bray 313 WOLTMAN
    Environmental Science undergrads only
  • (3) Section 05 - Writing/Env & Sci Professionls (#21340)
    View Textbook Information
      M 5:15 pm-8:05 pm Illick 16 WAGNER,D
  • (3) Section 06 - Writing/Env & Sci Professionls (#21341)
    View Textbook Information
      MWF 10:35 am-11:30 am Illick 16 STAVENHAGEN
  • (3) Section 07 - Writing/Env & Sci Professionls (#21342)
    View Textbook Information
      MWF 9:30 am-10:25 am Bray 315 STAVENHAGEN
    LA students only

EWP 444 - Professional Writing/Paper & Bioprocess Engineering (2)

Three hours of lecture, discussion, and workshops per week for 10 Weeks. Emphasizes writing practices required of paper and bioprocess engineers, including proposals and technical reports. Develop proficiency in determining the purpose of a document; analyzing audience; selecting, developing and organizing information in an appropriate design; and writing clearly, precisely and effectively. Fall.

  • (2) Section 01 - Prof Writing/Paper&Bioproc Eng (#21344)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 12:30 pm-1:50 pm Moon 19 JAGER
    PBE students only; coordinated with ESF 200

EWP 495 - Environmental Journalism (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. This course covers a range of topics related to journalism: interviewing, writing the lead, style, writing and organizing the story, layout, editing and revising, writing features and follow-up stories, covering speeches, etc. In addition, students explore how the media covers scientific and environmental issues. Students work on writing skills--from basic editing techniques to more sophisticated areas of style. Spring.

EWP 496 - Special Topics in Writing, Literature, and Public Presentation Skills (1-3)

Special topics of current interest to undergraduate students in writing, literature, and public presentation skills. A detailed course description will be presented as the topics area is identified and developed. Fall and Spring.

EWP 498 - Independent Study in Writing, Literature and Public Presentation Skills (1-3)

Guided individual study of a topic in composition, literature and public presentation skills. Enrollment is possible at various times during the semester. Fall and Spring.

Professor consent is required to register for this course.

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FCH

FCH 110 - Survey of Chemical Principles (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. An introduction to chemistry organized around physical and chemical properties of matter. Emphasizes the atomic structure of elements, bonds in chemical compounds, atomic ratios in molecules as the basis for the stoichiometry of reactions, ionic and organic compounds, chemical reactivity, kinetics and thermodynamics. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): none

FCH 111 - Survey of Chemical Principles Laboratory (1)

FCH 111. Survey of Chemical Principles Laboratory. (1) Three hours of laboratory per week. Basic and applied laboratory techniques will be emphasized through experiments dealing with: the density of solids and liquids, stoichiometry, calorimetry, chemical reactivity, gas laws, kinetics,acid/base chemistry, and organic chemistry. (Fall)
Prerequisite(s): none Corequisite: FCH110

FCH 132 - Orientation Seminar: Chemistry (1)

One hour of lecture and discussion per week. Introduction to campus resources available to ensure academic success. Introduction to chemistry as a field of inquiry. Introduction to laboratory safety. Fall.

FCH 150 - General Chemistry I (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. This first semester general chemistry course is organized around the physical and chemical properties of matter. It introduces the atomic structure of elements, the kinds of bonds in chemical compounds, how atomic ratios in molecules form the basis for the stoichiometry of reactions, begins a treatment of thermodynamics and discusses the principles of chemical reactivity. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): APM 104 (may be taken concurrently) or equivalent (ex. Precalculus).

FCH 151 - General Chemistry Laboratory I (1)

Three hours of laboratory per week. Basic laboratory techniques will be emphasized through experiments dealing with the density of solids and liquids, atomic ratios and mass combining ratios, atomic structure and the periodic table, calorimetry, chemical reactivity, geometric structure of molecules, formation of coordination compounds, and paper chromatography. Fall.
Corequisite: FCH 150.

  • (1) Section 02 - General Chemistry I Lab (#20478)
    View Textbook Information
      M 12:45 pm-3:35 pm Jahn 130 ABRAMS
      F 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Baker 146 ABRAMS
  • (1) Section 03 - General Chemistry I Lab (#27800)
    View Textbook Information
      Th 3:30 pm-6:20 pm Jahn 130 ABRAMS
      F 2:15 pm-5:15 pm Baker 146 ABRAMS
  • (1) Section 05 - General Chemistry I Lab (#20481)
    View Textbook Information
      M 3:45 pm-6:35 pm Jahn 130 ABRAMS
      F 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Baker 146 ABRAMS
  • (1) Section 06 - General Chemistry I Lab (#20482)
    View Textbook Information
      Tu 8:00 am-10:50 am Jahn 138 ABRAMS
      F 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Baker 146 ABRAMS
  • (1) Section 07 - General Chemistry I Lab (#20483)
    View Textbook Information
      Tu 12:30 pm-3:20 pm Jahn 130 ABRAMS
      F 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Baker 146 ABRAMS
  • (1) Section 08 - General Chemistry I Lab (#21277)
    View Textbook Information
      Tu 3:30 pm-6:20 pm Jahn 130 ABRAMS
      F 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Baker 146 ABRAMS
  • (1) Section 09 - General Chemistry I Lab (#21485)
    View Textbook Information
      W 9:30 am-12:20 pm Jahn 138 ABRAMS
      F 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Baker 146 ABRAMS
  • (1) Section 10 - General Chemistry I Lab (#21486)
    View Textbook Information
      W 12:45 pm-3:35 pm Jahn 130 ABRAMS
      F 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Baker 146 ABRAMS
  • (1) Section 11 - General Chemistry I Lab (#20525)
    View Textbook Information
      W 3:45 pm-6:35 pm Jahn 138 ABRAMS
      F 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Baker 146 ABRAMS
  • (1) Section 12 - General Chemistry I Lab (#21427)
    View Textbook Information
      Th 8:00 am-10:50 am Jahn 130 ABRAMS
      F 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Baker 146 ABRAMS
  • (1) Section 13 - General Chemistry I Lab (#20526)
    View Textbook Information
      Th 12:30 pm-3:20 pm Jahn 130 ABRAMS
      F 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Baker 146 ABRAMS

FCH 221 - Organic Chemistry I (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. The structure, properties and fundamental reactivity of organic compounds will be studied with emphasis on the reaction mechanisms and stereochemistry. In combination with FCH 223, this course provides a full survey of common classes of carbon compounds. Fall.
Prerequisite: FCH 150, FCH 151, FCH 152, FCH 153.

FCH 222 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1)

Four hours of laboratory including pre-laboratory instruction per week. Laboratory safety. Melting and boiling points, distillation, recrystallization, thin-layer and column chromatography, isolation of natural products, organic synthesis and spectroscopy. Fall.
Co-requisite: FCH 221.

  • (1) Section 01 - Organic Chemistry Lab 1 (#19747)
    View Textbook Information
      W 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Jahn 138 BRINKLEY
      M 6:45 pm-7:45 pm Baker 146 BRINKLEY
  • (1) Section 02 - Organic Chemistry Lab 1 (#20805)
    View Textbook Information
      Tu 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Jahn 138 BRINKLEY
      M 6:45 pm-7:45 pm Baker 146 BRINKLEY
  • (1) Section 03 - Organic Chemistry Lab 1 (#19748)
    View Textbook Information
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Jahn 138 BRINKLEY
      M 6:45 pm-7:45 pm Baker 146 BRINKLEY

FCH 232 - Career Skills for Chemists (1)

One hour of lecture per week. The objective of this course is to introduce a variety of important skills required for student success and, ultimately, career development as a practicing chemist. These skills include: Information literacy (library literature searching), communication (writing, presenting), ethics in science and academic integrity, finding employment and internships (resume and letter writing, interviewing skills). In addition, student will learn more about the B.S. Chemistry curriculum to set the stage for their choice of an "option" (Biochem, Polymer Chem, Environmental Chem. or ACS certified option) within the Chemistry Major. Fall
Prerequisite(s): none

  • (1) Section 01 - Career Skills for Chemists (#21412)
    View Textbook Information
      W 5:15 pm-6:10 pm Baker 141 STIPANOVIC
      W 5:15 pm-6:10 pm Baker 141 TEECE

FCH 360 - Physical Chemistry I (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. An introduction to the properties of gases and liquids, the laws of thermodynamics, phases, phase transitions, solutions and colligative properties, electrochemistry, and reaction equilibria. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): MAT 295 and 296, and PHY 211 and 212, or their equivalents.

FCH 380 - Analytical Chemistry I: Gravimetric, Titrimetric and Potentiometric Analysis (3)

Two hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Equilibrium concepts and practical implementations of precipitation, complexation, acid-base and oxidation-reduction processes in quantitative chemical analysis. Fall.
Prerequisites: One year of General Chemistry (I, II) plus the associated lab courses

  • (3) Section 01 - Analytical Chemistry I (#20537)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker 141 STIPANOVIC
      M 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Jahn 138 STIPANOVIC

FCH 384 - Spectrometric Identification of Organic Compounds (1-2)

Two hours of lecture and discussion per week. The first-half semester (1 credit) will deal with common classes of organic compounds; the second-half semester (1 credit) will deal with more complex structures. The use of complementary information from mass, infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance and ultraviolet spectrometry will be applied to identification of organic natural products. Fall.
Prerequisites: One year of Organic Chemistry.

FCH 399 - Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences (3)

Three hours of lecture and discussions per week. Atmospheric composition, mass and structure; solar radiation and the global energy budget; atmospheric moisture budget, cloud and precipitation; photolysis, gas-phase oxidation, aqueous chemistry, and gas-to-particle conversion; physical and chemical mechanisms driving environment phenomena such as acid rain, the greenhouse effect, the ozone hole, remote and urban air pollution, and haze.
Prerequisite(s): General physics I, 1 year each of general chemistry and calculus. Co-requisite(s): General physics II.

FCH 410 - Inorganic Chemistry (3)

Three hours of lecture and/or studio per week. This course serves as an introduction to the bonding, structure and reactivity of transition metals and main group elements. Topics will include but are not limited to covalent molecular structures, coordination chemistry, organometallic chemistry, catalysis, bioinorganic chemistry and solid state materials. The studio component focuses on the inorganic chemistry of artistic materials and traditional inorganic chemistry experiments. Fall.
Prerequisite: One year of general chemistry, one year of organic chemistry.

FCH 495 - Introduction to Professional Chemistry (1)

The professional chemistís relationship with industry, government and universities. Employment opportunities for the chemist, professional organizations and unions will be discussed. The selection of a senior research topic and a literature survey will be required. Fall.
Prerequisite: Senior status.

  • (1) Section 01 - Intro/Professional Chem (#19750)
    View Textbook Information
      M 5:15 pm-6:10 pm Baker 141 BOYER
      M 5:15 pm-6:10 pm Baker 141 ABRAMS

FCH 496 - Special Problems in Chemistry (1-3)

An opportunity for a special problem, technique development, independent or unstructured study in an area related to the chemical profession. The work may be technical, professional, or interdisciplinary. Advisors outside this department may be solicited. A brief proposal must be presented for approval with specific arrangements outlined including faculty advisor and objectives of the study. A written report will be expected. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite: Upper-division status.

FCH 498 - Introduction to Research (1-5)

3-4 hours per credit per week of laboratory and library research and report writing. Solution of a selected research problem using specialized techniques. A written report on data, procedures, results and conclusions. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisites: None. This course is the Senior Research requirement for all FCH undergraduates, of which five (5) credits are required in total.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

FCH 511 - Atmospheric Chemistry (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Graduate-level course in atmospheric chemistry. Atmospheric structure and composition. Catalytic cycles of ozone destruction and formation. Kinetic analysis of atmospheric reactions in gas and aqueous phase. Aerosols. Global climate change. Oxidation of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides. Fall.
Prerequisite: One year of undergraduate chemistry or permission of instructor.

FCH 515 - Methods of Environmental Chemical Analysis (3)

One hour of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. An introduction to sampling, analytical and quality control procedures necessary to obtain reliable water quality data. All analyses will be performed on a single aquatic system with the purpose of developing a final report characterizing the water quality of that system. Fall.
Prerequisite: A course in quantitative chemical analysis.

  • (3) Section 01 - Meth/Envrn Chem Analysis (#20593)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 3:30 pm-4:25 pm Baker 141 HASSETT,JHN
      W 2:15 pm-6:05 pm Jahn 137 HASSETT,JHN

FCH 530 - Biochemistry I (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. General biochemistry with emphasis on the chemistry of amino acids, proteins, and nucleic acids. The first half of the course will cover the chemistry of amino acids, proteins, and protein structure. The second half of the course will be an introduction to nucleic acid structure and function. This course requires critical review of current topics in Biochemistry not required in FCH 430. Fall
Prerequisite: FCH150, FCH151, FCH221, FCH223 or equivalents.

FCH 531 - Biochemistry Laboratory (3)

Two hours lecture and 6 hours of laboratory per week on the basic techniques used in biochemical research with an emphasis on proteins and enzymes. Techniques include spectrometry, chromatography, electrophoresis, amino acid analysis, coupled assays, and the isolation and characterization of enzymes. This course requires critical review of current topics in Biochemistry not required in FCH 431. Fall.
Prerequisites: FCH150, FCH152, FCH221, and FCH223 or equivalents. Co-requisite: FCH530 or persmission of instructor

FCH 550 - Polymer Science: Synthesis and Mechanisms (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to the synthesis of polymers and the mechanism of polymerization processes. Fundamental principles of polymer chemistry. Step-growth polymerization and network formation (theory of gelation). Chain-growth homopolymerization and copolymerization by radical-, ionic-, and coordination type catalysts. Synthesis of block and graft copolymers. Structure of polymers and their application. Polymers and the environment, polymer recycling. Fall
Prerequisites: One year of organic chemistry and one year of physical chemistry.

FCH 551 - Polymer Techniques (3)

Two hours of lecture/discussion and four hours of laboratory per week; laboratory reports, final exam. Twelve experiments covering the main topics of polymer synthesis (four weeks), molecular weight determination (four weeks), and characterization (four weeks) are selected from areas such as the following: free-radical solution, bulk and emulsion polymerizations; ionic and condensation polymerizations, copolymerization and reactivity ratio determination; osmometry, viscometry, light scattering, gel permeation chromatography, polarized light microscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, dynamic mechanical analysis, stress-strain analysis; nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. The lecture component will include discussions of the laboratory activities as well as related topics such as the preparation of monomers, safe handling methods for monomers, polymers, solvents, catalysts, etc. Fall.
Prerequisites: One year of organic and one year of physical chemistry, or permission of instructor. Co-registration in FCH 552 is recommended.

  • (3) Section 01 - Polymer Techniques (#20596)
    View Textbook Information
      M 12:45 pm-1:40 pm Baker 432 GITSOV
      M 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Jahn 137 GITSOV

FCH 796 - Special Topics in Chemistry (1-3)

Lectures, conferences and discussion. Advanced topics in physical chemistry, organic chemistry or biochemistry. Fall and Spring.

FCH 797 - Graduate Seminar (1)

Presentation and discussion of a selected topic in chemistry. Topics to be selected by participating faculty each semester. Fall and Spring.

  • (1) Section 01 - Envrn & Biochem Seminar (#19755)
    View Textbook Information
      TBA Day TBA NOMURA
  • (1) Section 03 - First Year Grad Student Semin (#27684)
    View Textbook Information
      Th 2:00 pm-2:50 pm TBA RTBA DIBBLE
      Th 2:00 pm-2:50 pm TBA RTBA DONAGHY

FCH 798 - Research in Chemistry (1-12)

Independent research in chemistry. One written report required. Fall, Spring and Summer.

FCH 899 - Master's Thesis Research (1-12)

Research and independent study for the master's degree and thesis. Fall, Spring and Summer.

FCH 997 - Seminar (1)

Seminars scheduled weekly; an average of 20 to 30 seminars are given annually. Discussion of recent advances in chemistry. Credit is given only once to a student. Fall and Spring.

FCH 999 - Doctoral Thesis Research (1-12)

Research and independent study for the doctoral degree and dissertation. Fall, Spring and Summer.

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FOR

FOR 132 - Orientation Seminar: F&NRM (1)

Thirteen hours of lecture and six hours of field time. An introduction to forest and natural resource management and related career paths. Indoor and outdoor lectures expand student awareness of ESFís educational opportunities, properties, and faculty in FNRM. Fall.

FOR 202 - Introduction to Sociology (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. General introductory principles and methods of sociology including group dynamics and development, different structural arrangement of social groups, community development and adjustment processes, relationships with the natural environment. Fall and Spring.

FOR 203 - Western Civilization and the Environment (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. General survey of the history of Western civilization from ancient societies through the seventeenth century, with attention to environmental and natural resource issues and perspectives. Analysis of the rise of the West. Historic and contemporary influences of the Western tradition. Fall and Spring.

FOR 205 - Principles of Accounting (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Principles and methods used in financial and managerial accounting. Includes interpretation and effective use of financial statements through study of the accounting model, the measurement processes, data classification and terminology. Fall and Spring.

FOR 207 - Introduction to Economics (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Coverage of basic theory in microeconomics and macroeconomics. Application of theory and economic models to problems at the firm and national policy levels. Exploration of topics in money and banking, globalization and economic development. Fall and Spring.

FOR 296 - Special Topics in Resource Management/Forestry (1-3)

Experimental, interdisciplinary or special coursework at the freshman or sophomore levels. Subject matter and course format vary from semester to semester. Fall or Spring.

  • (1) Section 01 - Intro/Watershed Hydrology (#20809)
    View Textbook Information
      TBA Day TBA STAFF
    On-line course; non-matriculated students only

FOR 298 - Research Internship in Forest and Natural Resources Management (1-3)

Students will participate in research projects consistent with their educational and professional goals. A faculty member in the Department of Forest and Natural Resources Management will serve as the studentís faculty sponsor. The student in consultation with the faculty sponsor will prepare a study plan outlining the educational goals of the apprenticeship. The faculty sponsor will generate a performance assessment and record of activities at the end of the apprenticeship. Grading Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Fall, Spring, Summer.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor

FOR 321 - Forest Ecology and Silviculture (3)

Two hours of classroom lecture with weekly three-hour trips and labs to forests across Central New York. Survey of forest tree and stand ecology (silvics) and silviculture concepts, applications and implications for treatment of forest stands for various values. Experiential learning emphasized through a strong field component of assessing vegetation, site quality and land use history variables, and treatment alternatives to create different forest conditions. For students outside forest resources management curriculum; not open to students taking FOR 332 and FOR 334. Fall.
Prerequisite: Botany or general biology. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 321 and FOR 521.

  • (3) Section 01 - Forest Ecol&Silviculture (#19775)
    View Textbook Information
      M 11:40 am-12:35 pm Baker 146 NOWAK
      Tu 12:30 pm-5:15 pm Field Trip NOWAK
  • (3) Section 02 - Forest Ecology & Silviculture (#20657)
    View Textbook Information
      M 11:40 am-12:35 pm Baker 146 NOWAK
      W 12:45 pm-5:30 pm Field Trip NOWAK

FOR 322 - Natural Resources Measurements and Sampling (3)

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory. Principles and methods used in the measurement and quantitative analysis of natural resources, including vegetation, water, soils, recreation and wildlife. The application of sampling designs for estimating populations and inventory planning, and statistical analysis for quantifying sampling error. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): FOR 304 or equivalent; APM 391 or equivalent

  • (3) Section 01 - Nat Res Measuremnts & Sampling (#19776)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:00 am-8:55 am Marshall 212 BEVILACQUA
      Tu 12:30 pm-4:30 pm Baker 309
  • (3) Section 02 - Nat Res Measuremnts & Sampling (#21334)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:00 am-8:55 am Marshall 212 BEVILACQUA
      F 12:45 pm-4:30 pm Baker 309

FOR 330 - Studies in Silviculture (3)

Three hours of lecture per week, with reading assignments, exams, and projects. Students gain an appreciation of silviculture and its use for influencing the character, composition, and development of forest stands, and the conceptual framework for those practices. Projects provide opportunities to explore techniques for analyzing forest stands and developing prescriptions. Fall

FOR 332 - Forest Ecology (4)

Three hours of lecture/discussion and three hours of laboratory per week. Structure, function and dynamics of forest ecosystems at multiple scales, from trees to landscapes, including human interactions. Topics include ecophysiology, disturbance, succession, carbon and nutrient cycling, forest management, invasive species and climate change. Field data collection and analysis. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): FOR 232, or EFB 101 and 102, or equivalent by permission of instructor.

  • (4) Section 01 - Forest Ecology (#19777)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 9:30 am-10:50 am Bray 313 BEIER
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Bray 313

FOR 334 - Silviculture (4)

Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. The practice of silviculture in managing stands to serve various landowner interests. Field trips and exercises provide opportunities to see examples of silvicultural methods under different management scenarios, and to learn and practice techniques for analyzing forest stands and developing prescriptions for their treatment. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 334 and FOR 534.

  • (4) Section 01 - Silviculture (#19778)
    View Textbook Information
      MWF 11:40 am-12:35 pm Bray 315 NYLAND
      W 12:45 pm-5:30 pm TBA

FOR 345 - Introduction to Soils (3)

Two hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Introduction to the fundamentals of soil science in the context of soil as an ecosystem component. Fall.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: 1 semester of Introductory Chemistry. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 345 and FOR 545.

  • (3) Section 01 - Introduction to Soils (#19779)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker 146 BRIGGS
    Labs will meet in Baker during the first week of the semester
      M 12:45 pm-4:45 pm Marshall B-13
  • (3) Section 02 - Introduction to Soils (#19780)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker 146 BRIGGS
      Tu 12:30 pm-4:40 pm Marshall B-13
  • (3) Section 03 - Introduction to Soils (#19781)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker 146 BRIGGS
      W 12:45 pm-4:45 pm Marshall B-13
  • (3) Section 04 - Introduction to Soils (#21064)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker 146 BRIGGS
      Th 12:30 pm-4:40 pm Marshall B-13 BRIGGS
  • (3) Section 05 - Introduction to Soils (#21182)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker 146 BRIGGS
      F 12:45 pm-4:45 pm Marshall B-13 BRIGGS

FOR 360 - Principles of Management (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. This course focuses on the basic theories, concepts, principles and functions of modern management and administration, with an emphasis on the four functions of management: leading, planning, organizing, controlling. The four functions of management are applied to the public and private sectors, as well as for profit and not-for-profit organizations. Environmental management systems, corporate ethics and social responsibility and systematic problem solving are among the principal topics emphasized. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 360 and FOR 560.

FOR 373 - Sustainable Harvesting Practices (3)

Two hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Overview of forest roads and timber harvesting; planning, construction, and maintenance of forest roads; economic and environmental characteristics of harvesting systems; safety and health; wood procurement systems; and the role of forest operations in the broader context of forest management. Fall.
Prerequisite: FOR 322 or FOR 334 or permission of instructor.

  • (3) Section 01 - Sustainable Harvesting Pract (#20752)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 10:35 am-11:30 am Bray 315 GERMAIN
      M 12:45 pm-5:05 pm TBA

FOR 402 - Professional Forestry Mentoring Program (1)

One-hour session per week supplemented by a one-day internship with a professional forester. Sessions will focus on contemporary issues in forestry including a historical perspective of the forestry profession, what it means to be a forester today, the role of certification and licensing, and professional ethics. It will serve to increase the professionalism of the forestry students. Fall.
Prerequisites: Junior status or permission of instructor.

FOR 411 - Analytical and Technical Writing for Resource Managers (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Research, summary, and evaluation of scholarly and grey literature. Application of decision making process and written recommendation. Introduction to argument. Composition of a technical report related to management major. Proposal writing and development of brochures, posters, and/or presentations for defined audiences. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisites: EWP 290 or equivalent, and junior or senior status in FNRM

FOR 442 - Watershed Ecology and Management (3)

Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Introduction to watershed ecology and stream ecosystems. Interactions and linkages among upland, riparian and stream processes. Management and restoration associated with multiple uses of forest and rangelands. Explore influences of spatial and temporal scale, watershed and network position, disturbance regimes, and global change. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 442 and FOR 642.

FOR 458 - Advanced Topics in GIS (3)

Two hours of lectures and three hours of labs per week. Lecture, demonstration, discussion, and lab exercises. Apply advanced geoprocessing techniques in resource analysis and modeling. Students complete a capstone project. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): ESF300 or equivalent.

FOR 465 - Natural Resources Policy (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Examination of US and NYS government roles in natural resource policy, and how government policies influence the management of public and private lands. Analysis of institutions, participants, and drivers of public lands, forest, water, wetlands, wildlife, fisheries, and fire policies. Fall.

FOR 475 - Recreation Behavior and Management (3)

Three hours of lecture per week and a one-day field trip. Applies sociological and psychological concepts to: 1) individual preferences for recreation activities and settings, 2) description of recreation visitor behavior, 3) sources of management problems, 4) developing direct and indirect visitor management strategies, and 5) recreation planning decisions necessary to manage recreation settings and experiences. Students have the opportunity to apply concepts to personal recreation experiences. A one-day field trip is required. Fall.
Prerequisite: FOR 372 or equivalent, enrollment in the Natural Resource Management major or Recreation Resources and Protected Area Management minor, or permission of instructor.

FOR 476 - Ecotourism and Nature Tourism (3)

Three hours of instruction per week. Overview of ecotourism and nature tourism programs and efforts around the world. Community, business, and organizational structures necessary for managing ecotourism and nature tourism programs are discussed, as are related environmental, social, and economic impacts. One-day field trip. Fall.
Prerequisite: FOR 372. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 476 and FOR 676.

FOR 478 - Wilderness and Wildlands Management (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. One, two-day, overnight field trip. Review of the state and federal legislation and agency policies that frame the planning and management of public lands designated as wilderness or wildlands. Emphasizes stewardship and management for protection of natural resources and human values. Concepts include carrying capacity, preservation of ecological conditions and processes, visitor management, dispersed recreation management, human values and benefits, and planning frameworks. Fall.
Prerequisite: FOR 372 or equivalent. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 478 and FOR 678.

FOR 480 - Urban Forestry (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Evaluation and management of urban greenspace resources, with emphasis on urban trees, in the context of other values and management processes in urban areas. Class practice in evaluating urban greenspace and tree resources. Fall.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status in any Forest and Natural Resources Management programs or permission of instructor for juniors and seniors in other programs. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 480 and FOR 680.

FOR 487 - Environmental Law and Policy (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introduction to the approaches used in US environmental law. Analysis of common law and statutory designs and strategies used to address environmental problems. Examination of common law environmental remedies, Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Endangered Species Act, hazardous waste, and other environmental laws. Fall.
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 487 and FOR 687.

  • (3) Section 01 - Environmental Law and Policy (#20704)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:00 am-9:20 am Baker 148 MALMSHEIMER

FOR 495 - Undergraduate Teaching Assistance (1-3)

Undergraduate students gain experience as teaching assistants. They assist the instructor with the teaching and learning experience, assist students with learning course concepts, and mentor students on how to succeed in an undergraduate course. Responsibilities vary by section and instructor. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Prior completion of course to be assisted with grade of B or better.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

FOR 496 - Special Topics in Resource Management/Forestry (1-3)

Experimental and developmental courses in new areas of resource management/forestry or areas not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Topics may include but are not limited to the biological, physical, and social dimensions and the many and varied resources of forest lands and forestry. Specific detailed course descriptions for each course taught under the FOR 496 designation are available for student perusal. Fall, Spring and Summer.

FOR 498 - Independent Study in Forest Resources Management (1-6)

Independent research or study in resource management/forestry for selected undergraduate students. Selection of subject area, nature of the research or study, and number of credit hours determined by student in conference with appropriate faculty member; initiative in taking FOR 498 rests with the student. Final written report is required for record. Fall, Spring and Summer.
Prerequisite: Cumulative GPA of at least 2.50 and approval of the adviser and instructor.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

FOR 499 - Internship in Forest and Natural Resources Management (1-12)

Full- or part-time engagement as volunteer or employee working for off-campus resource management/forestry/renewable energy organization under guidance of external supervisor. Record of activities and final written report is required for record. Junior or senior status, cumulative GPA of at least 2.5, and written approval of a study plan by faculty advisor and field supervisor must be submitted prior to its commencement. Fall, Spring and Summer.
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status. Must have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

FOR 521 - Forest Ecology and Silviculture (3)

Two hours of classroom lecture with weekly three-hour trips and labs to forests across Central New York. Study of the conceptual underpinnings and application of forest ecology via explorations of the environmental complex and silvicultural systems. Experiential learning is emphasized through a strong field component of assessing vegetation, site and land use history variables, and treatment alternatives to create different forest conditions. Provides a study of trees as individuals and communities, and how we can manipulate them both using planned methods and techniques to affect sustained production of a wide variety of forest ecosystem benefits, services, and values. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): Botany or general biology. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 321 and FOR 521. Note: Not open to students taking FOR 534.

  • (3) Section 01 - Forest Ecology & Silviculture (#20621)
    View Textbook Information
      M 11:40 am-12:35 pm Baker 146 NOWAK
      Tu 12:30 pm-5:15 pm Field Trip NOWAK
  • (3) Section 02 - Forest Ecology & Silviculture (#20658)
    View Textbook Information
      M 11:40 am-12:35 pm Baker 146 NOWAK
      W 12:45 pm-5:30 pm Field Trip NOWAK

FOR 522 - Forest Mensuration (3)

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Principles and methods used in the measurement of standing trees, forest stands, forest products and growth. The application of sampling designs and analysis for forest valuation and inventory planning. Graduate students will be required to complete two additional term projects in addition to those required of undergraduate students. Fall.
Prerequisites: FOR 304 or equivalent. Co-requisites: APM 391 or equivalent. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 322 and FOR 522.

  • (3) Section 01 - Forest Mensuration (#20758)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 8:00 am-8:55 am Marshall 212 BEVILACQUA
      Tu 12:30 pm-4:00 pm Baker 309 BEVILACQUA

FOR 530 - Studies in Silviculture (3)

Three hours of lecture per week, with reading assignments, exams, and projects. Students gain an appreciation of silviculture and its use for influencing the character, composition, and development of forest stands, and the conceptual framework for those practices. Projects provide opportunities to explore techniques for analyzing forest stands and developing prescriptions. Fall

FOR 532 - Forest Ecology (4)

Four hours of lecture/discussion and three hours of laboratory per week. Structure, function and dynamics of forest ecosystems at multiple scales, from trees to landscapes, including human interactions. Topics include ecophysiology, disturbance, succession, carbon and nutrient cycling, forest management, invasive species and climate change. Field data collection and analysis. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate coursework in biology/ecology; or by permission of instructor

  • (4) Section 01 - Forest Ecology (#20759)
    View Textbook Information
      TuTh 9:30 am-10:50 am Bray 313 BEIER
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Bray 313 BEIER

FOR 534 - Silvicultural Practice (4)

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. The practice of silviculture in managing stands to serve various landowner interests, and explore the conceptual framework for those practices. Field trips and exercises provide opportunities to see examples of silvicultural methods under different management scenarios and to learn and practice techniques for analyzing forest stands and developing prescriptions for their treatment. Laboratory projects include reports that explore the conceptual and technical rationale for silvicultural decisions. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 334 and FOR 534.

  • (4) Section 01 - Silvicultural Practice (#20597)
    View Textbook Information
      MWF 11:40 am-12:35 pm Bray 315 NYLAND
    Professor consent is required to register for this section.
      W 12:45 pm-5:30 pm TBA NYLAND

FOR 545 - Introduction to Soils (3)

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Introduction to the fundamentals of soil science in the context of soil as an ecosystem component. Fall.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: one semester of Introductory Chemistry or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 345 and FOR 545.

  • (3) Section 01 - Introduction to Soils (#20598)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 9:30 am-10:25 am Baker 146 BRIGGS
    MUST ALSO ATTEND ONE OF THE LAB SECTIONS OF FOR345 Labs will meet in Baker during the first week of the semester
      TBA Day Marshall B-13

FOR 557 - Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems (3)

Three hours of lecture/discussion/recitation per week. Fundamental concepts of Geographic Information Systems (GIS); raster and vector data models and geodatabase design; common raster and vector data analysis tools used in the fields of forest and natural resources management, environmental science,conservation biology, ecology, and landscape architecture; cartographic model construction; and map design. Completion of an independent project is required. Fall
Prerequisite(s): none

FOR 560 - Principles of Management for Environmental Professionals (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. This course focuses on the basic theories, concepts, principles and functions of modem management and administration, with an emphasis on the four functions of management: leading. planning, organizing, controlling. The four functions of management are applied to the public and private sectors, as well as for profit and not-for-profit organizations. Environmental management systems, corporate ethics and social responsibility and systematic problem solving are among the principal topics emphasized. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): none.

FOR 573 - Sustainable Harvesting Practices (3)

Two hours lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Overview of forest roads and timber harvesting; planning, construction, and maintenance of forest roads; economic and environmental characteristics of harvesting systems; safety and health; wood procurement systems; and the role of forest operations in the broader context of forest management. Emphasis on application of knowledge, requiring a written report with a problem-solving focus. Fall.
Prerequisite: FOR 322 and FOR 334 or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 373 and FOR 573.

  • (3) Section 01 - Sustainable Harvesting Pract (#20760)
    View Textbook Information
      MW 10:35 am-11:30 am Bray 315 GERMAIN
      M 12:45 pm-5:05 pm TBA GERMAIN

FOR 642 - Watershed Ecology and Management (3)

Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Introduction to watershed ecology and stream ecosystems. Interactions and linkages among upland, riparian and stream processes. Management and restoration associated with multiple uses of forest and rangelands. Explore influences of spatial and temporal scale, watershed and network position, disturbance regimes, and global change. Students will apply course concepts to an independent research project. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 442 and FOR 642.

FOR 665 - Natural Resources Policy (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Analysis and application of political, policy formation, and policy administration theories to natural resources. Examination of drivers of U.S. natural resources policies. Analysis of private lands, public lands, forest, wildlife, endangered species, water, fire, and certification policies. Focus is on U.S. natural resources policies. Spring.
Prerequisite: graduate standing.

FOR 676 - Ecotourism and Nature Tourism (3)

Three hours of instruction per week. Overview of ecotourism and nature tourism programs and efforts around the world. Community, business, and organizational structures necessary for managing ecotourism and nature tourism programs. Environmental, social, and economic impacts. One-day field trip. Graduate level readings, assignments, and exams. Fall.
Prerequisite: FOR 372. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 476 and FOR 676.

FOR 678 - Wilderness and Wildlands Management (3)

Three hours of lecture per week and one, two-day, overnight field trip. Reviews the state and federal legislation and agency policies that frame the planning and management of public lands designated as wilderness or wildlands. Emphasizes the use of wilderness research information for adaptive management approaches to stewardship of and planning for protection of natural resources and human values. Fall.
Prerequisite: FOR 372 or equivalent. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 478 and FOR 678.

FOR 680 - Urban Forestry (3)

Three hours of lecture per week. Evaluation and management of urban greenspace resources, with emphasis on urban trees, in the context of other values and management processes in urban areas. Class practice in evaluating urban greenspace and tree resources, development of a research paper on urban forestry. Fall.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both FOR 480 and FOR 680.
Professor consent is required to register for this course.

FOR 692 - Capstone in Forest and Natural Resources Management (3)

Three hours of seminar discussions and presentations per week. Students will integrate and apply their knowledge of forest natural resources management to practical problems of their own design in their areas of interest, in consultation with clients whom they identify to be in need of their professional services. Class sessions include opportunities to develop advanced knowledge and professional skills, such as research, analysis, management, and communication. The final project outcomes are delivered through written reports and oral presentations. Fall.

  • (3) Section 01 - Capstone/For&Nat Res Mgt (#21046)
    View Textbook Information
      TBA Day TBA RTBA YANAI
    Professor consent is required to register for this section.

FOR 694 - Writing for Scientific Publication (3)

Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Students will improve their skills in technical reporting by preparing a manuscript suitable for submission to a scientific journal. Topics include selection of an appropriate journal, design of effective figures and tables, sequential preparation of sections of the manuscript, writing tips, peer review and ethical issues. Spring.

Professor consent is required to register for this course.

FOR 796 - Special Topics in Forest Resources Management (1-3)

Lectures, seminars, and discussion. Advanced topics in resource management and policy. Check schedule of classes for details of subject matter. Fall and/or Spring.

  • (3) Section 03 - Quantitative Meth&Models in R (#21369)
    View Textbook Information
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Bray 313 STELLA
    Preq:Grad-level stats classes. Students should be in at least the 2nd yr of prog & have their own data set to analyze
      Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Bray 313 FRAIR

FOR 797 - Seminar (1)

Individual presentation and group discussion concerning current topics of concern to natural resources or their management. Fall and Spring.

FOR 798 - Research Problems in Forest and Natural Resources Management (1-12)

Special investigation and analysis of forest and natural resources management topics. A study plan and a final written report are required. Fall and Spring.

FOR 898 - Professional Experience/Internship (1-6)

Professional experience/internship which applies, enriches, or complements formal coursework. All professional experiences/internships must have a signed experience/internship agreement on record with the advisor. Graded on an ďS/UĒ basis. Fall, Spring, and Summer.

FOR 899 - Masterís Thesis Research (1-12)

Investigation leading to the completion of a Masterís thesis. Graded on an ďS/UĒ basis. Fall, Spring, and Summer.

FOR 999 - Doctoral Thesis Research (1-12)

Investigation leading to the completion of the doctoral thesis. Graded on an "S/U" basis. Fall, Spring and Summer.

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FTC

FTC 200 - Dendrology (3)

Thirty eight hours of lecture, and forty hours of field laboratory. Characteristics, distribution, and uses of tree species in North America. Identifying plant species using common and scientific names, from leaf, twig, fruit, or bark samples. Habitats, species associates, and succession of plants, including some invasive species. Fall.

    FTC 202 - Introduction to Surveying (3)

    Twenty eight hours of lecture and 72 hours of laboratory and field exercises. The course is an introduction to the theory and practice of plane surveying. Emphasis is on developing individual skills and techniques through small crew projects where it is necessary to handle typical surveying equipment in actual field situations. Lecture topics include the theory of measurements and errors, field record keeping procedures, mathematics for plane surveying, introduction to field problems, introduction to map use and preparation, concepts of land tenure systems and basic computer aided drafting. Students tour the various offices found at the County courthouse and participate in a research exercise. Field projects include traversing using common foresterís and surveyorís tools and instruments, mapping including field and office procedure, and proficiency projects in handling various surveying instruments. Fall.

      FTC 204 - Introduction to Natural Resources Measurements (4)

      Forty-five hours of lecture and sixty hours of field/laboratory. A study of the tools and techniques used to measure primary forest products and inventory and/or measure natural resources, such as timber, water, biomass, carbon stocks, wildlife habitat, recreation use and impact, and plant diversity. Professional presentation of forest inventory data in the form of technical reports. Basic forest sampling methods are used and compared, and associated statistical methods are learned and applied. Fall.
      Prerequisite(s): none.

        FTC 205 - Computer Aided Drafting and Design 1 (2)

        Eighteen hours of lecture and 36 hours of laboratory time. An introductory course in computer aided drafting. Emphasis is on developing individual skills and techniques for making professional quality drawings and maps. Topics include the drawing, editing, layer management, dimensioning, survey computations, data reduction, contouring and Geographic Information Systems. Fall.
        Prerequisite(s): FTC 202 - Introduction to Surveying

          FTC 206 - Forest Ecology (4)

          Fifty-one hours of lecture and fifty-six hours of laboratory and field. Study of interactions between forest vegetation and the environment. Considers how sunlight, moisture, soils and climate impact species presence, composition and growth. Human dimension of forest ecology, including critical thinking and evaluation of environmental issues. Fall.

            FTC 207 - Communications and Safety (3)

            Twenty six hours lecture and fifty eight hours laboratory provides students with technical competence. Students develop study skills, handwriting skills, computer skills and communication skills including how to use library services. A resume and cover letter will be prepared for use in the job search process. Students receive training on the proper use and maintenance of forest hand tools and chainsaws. Students receive advanced training in the use and maintenance of chainsaws, and skidding equipment. First Aid and CPR/AED are covered as well as wilderness first aid. Prepares students for living in remote areas. Fall
            Prerequisite(s): none.

              FTC 208 - Remote Sensing and GIS Technology (3)

              Thirty hours of lecture and forty-five hours of laboratory. This course is an introduction to the use of remote sensing and geographic information systems in the field of natural resources. Students practice interpretation of aerial photographs and digital imagery to measure horizontal distances and azimuths and calculate ground area. Acquisition, creation and basic analysis of spatial data are also emphasized. Fall.
              Prerequisite(s): None.

                FTC 209 - Timber Harvesting (2)

                Eighteen hours of lecture and thirty six hours of laboratory or field instruction. Student learns basic harvesting methods with northeastern United States emphasis and its relationship to other forest uses. Student understand the role of best management practices in timber harvesting. A technical competence in timber sale contract administration and basic timber appraisal is gained. Fall.
                Co-requisite(s): FTC 204, FTC 207.

                  FTC 210 - Wildlife Techniques (2)

                  Eighteen hours of lecture and thirty-six hours field and laboratory time. Standard methods and techniques for measuring, monitoring, controlling and evaluating wildlife populations are discussed, demonstrated and/or practiced. Further practice in measuring and evaluating wildlife habitat. Identification of common birds, amphibians, reptiles and mammals by sight and sound. Fall.
                  Prerequisites: FTC 200, FTC 202, and FTC 204.

                    FTC 298 - Independent Study in Forest Technology (1-6)

                    Independent study in forest technology to apply, enhance or supplement forest technology or related natural resource education. Objectives and scope of the project are negotiated in a learning contract between the student and instructor(s), with course admission based on permission of the instructor(s). Limited to those who have attended the complete regular SFT program, or those who have graduated from another forest technology program or a related natural resource program, or to students enrolled in any ESF program other than SFT. A maximum of six credit hours may be taken by any student in total. Semesters as arranged. Fall, Spring or Summer.

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                      GNE

                      GNE 271 - Statics (3)

                      Three hours of lecture per week. Covers fundamentals of analysis of static systems including equilibrium of rigid bodies, distributed loads, and trusses. A portion of the class is spent on open-ended problem solving and engineering design. Fall.
                      Prerequisite: Physics I (Mechanics) and Calculus II

                      • (3) Section 01 - Statics (#21484)
                        View Textbook Information
                          MWF 12:45 pm-1:40 pm Marshall 319 SHAW,S
                        Preq: Physics I (mechanics) and integral and derivative calculus (typically through Calculus II)

                      GNE 330 - Professional Engineering Skills Seminar (0.5)

                      Two hour seminar approximately every other week. Professional skills needed by engineers to be successful in their profession including teamwork, ethics, communications, impact of engineering solutions, life-long learning, and contemporary issues. Seminar topics include industry outlook, professional organizations, networking, finance, management, personnel issues, among other topics. Topics will typically be covered on a three-year cycle. Fall and Spring.

                      GNE 410 - Structures (4)

                      Three hours of lecture, three hours of computation laboratory and discussion per week. Engineering principles in the analysis, planning design and construction of components and framed structures under various types of loadings. The proportioning of wood, steel and composite members and the design of statically determinate structural systems. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between theoretical stress analysis and codes and specifications for appropriate materials and structural design practices. Fall.
                      Prerequisite(s): GNE 273 and scientific computing.

                      GNE 461 - Air Pollution Engineering (3)

                      Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Study of physical, chemical, legislative, and meteorological aspects of air pollution and its control. Air quality and emission standards. Local and global effects of air pollution and atmospheric dispersion modeling. Design principles of air pollution control devices. Fall.
                      Prerequisites: 1 year of college-level physics, chemistry and calculus. Note: Credit will not be granted for both GNE 461 and GNE 661.

                      GNE 530 - Professional Engineering Skills Seminar (0.5)

                      Two hour seminar approximately every other week. Professional skills needed by engineers to be successful in their profession including teamwork, ethics, communications, impact of engineering solutions, life-long learning, and contemporary issues. Seminar topics include industry outlook, professional organizations, networking, finance, management, personnel issues, among other topics. Topics will typically be covered on a three-year cycle. A project is required. Fall and Spring.

                      GNE 661 - Air Pollution Engineering (3)

                      Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Study of physical, chemical, legislative, and meteorological aspects of air pollution and its control. Air quality and emission standards. Local and global effects of air pollution and atmospheric dispersion modeling. Design principles of air pollution control devices. Fall.
                      Prerequisites: 1 year of college-level physics, chemistry and calculus. Note: Credit will not be granted for both GNE 461 and GNE 661.

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                      LSA

                      LSA 132 - Orientation Seminar: Landscape Architecture (1)

                      One hour of lecture, discussion and/or exercises per week. Occasional field trips. Orientation to campus resources available to ensure academic success. Introduction to the professional culture and some topics of interest to landscape architects. Fall.

                      LSA 182 - Drawing Studio (3)

                      Six hours of studio and one hour of lecture per week. This drawing course introduces the students to materials, techniques and components of drawing, architectural elements and figure drawing. Fall and Spring.
                      Prerequisite: Landscape architecture students or permission of instructor.

                      LSA 206 - Art, Culture and Landscape II (3)

                      Three hours of lecture per week. The course will examine the evolution of cultural expression in the arts and allied design professions. Lectures will emphasize the interrelationships between the arts and their relation to cultural contexts from the Renaissance to the present day. Spring.

                      LSA 220 - Introduction to Landscape Architecture (3)

                      Three hours of lecture per week. LSA 220 presents an overview and introduction to the profession of landscape architecture. It presents a survey of the development of the profession in the United States and how the profession responds to societal needs in providing services to various public and private clients. Emphasis is placed on understanding the significance of environmental, socio/cultural, physical/visual, and aesthetic factors in developing intervention strategies and designs. Contemporary landscape architectural issues, practitioners and work are presented. Fall.

                      • (3) Section 01 - Intro/Landscape Architect (#21049)
                        View Textbook Information
                          MW 5:15 pm-6:35 pm Marshall 110 FERNANDEZ
                          MW 5:15 pm-6:35 pm Marshall 110 HAWKS

                      LSA 226 - Foundation Design Studio I (4)

                      Five hours of studio and one hour of lecture per week. Studio time devoted to demonstrations, exercises and projects. Content focuses on skills and knowledge necessary to visualize and communicate 2-D and 3-D design ideas using appropriate traditional or digital graphic tools, techniques and technology. An emphasis is placed on the development of a working graphic and spatial design vocabulary and an introduction and application of fundamental design principles and the design process. Fall.
                      Prerequisite: LSA 182 or permission of instructor.

                      • (4) Section 01 - Foundation Design Studio I (#20585)
                        View Textbook Information
                          TuTh 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Marshall 103 HOGUE
                          TuTh 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Marshall 103 GAVITT

                      LSA 300 - Digital Methods and Graphics I (3)

                      Three hours of lecture per week. Through active participation, students learn to produce 2D digital graphics and documents (posters, reports, presentations and e-docs). Content includes image processing and vector drawing; document assembly for print, viewing and electronic distribution; and general concepts of digital workflow management. Credit will not be given for both LSA 300 and LSA 500. Fall.
                      Prerequisite: Undergraduate standing in Landscape Architecture, Natural History and Interpretation or permission.

                      • (3) Section 01 - Digital Methods & Graphics I (#21289)
                        View Textbook Information
                          M 8:25 am-9:20 am Marshall 409 REUTER
                          Tu 8:00 am-10:00 am Marshall 303 REUTER
                      • (3) Section 02 - Digital Methods & Graphics I (#21291)
                        View Textbook Information
                          M 8:25 am-9:20 am Marshall 409 REUTER
                          Th 8:00 am-10:00 am Marshall 303 REUTER

                      LSA 306 - History of Landscape Architecture II (3)

                      Three hours of lecture per week. Survey of landscape design in the modern era, emphasizing the 20th century through the emergence of contemporary practice. Lectures and readings on significant movements, works and designers in the cultural, social and environmental context of the period. Fall.
                      Prerequisites: LSA 305, or permission of instructor.

                      LSA 311 - Natural Processes in Design and Planning (3)

                      Three hours of lecture per week. An overview of basic principles and processes of physical and biological landscape systems with respect to their roles in landscape design and planning. Emphasizes landform, soil, slope, hydrology, climate, energy and general ecological issues as common elements influencing landscape design and the land use decision-making process. Sources and uses of environmental data are discussed. Fall.
                      Note: Credit will not be granted for both EST 311 and LSA 311.

                      LSA 312 - Place/Culture/Design (3)

                      Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introduction to the interpretation of common places (streets, plazas, shopping malls, neighborhoods, parks, etc.) as expressions of culture. The course uses an interdisciplinary cultural studies approach to analyze the cultural processes and practices that shape places and applies these understandings in the context of design professions. Course requirements include readings, discussions, projects, reports and examinations. Field trips may be scheduled. Fall.

                      LSA 321 - Ecological Applications in Planning and Design (3)

                      Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to concepts of ecology and landscape ecology related to sustainable land planning and design. Emphasis on using theory to guide planning and design decision making, with a goal of greater integration of ecological concepts into professional work. Fall.
                      Prerequisite(s): Junior standing in the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture program or permission of the instructor.

                      LSA 326 - Landscape Architectural Design Studio I (5)

                      Seven hours of studio and one hour of lecture per week. This course will instruct those enrolled in the processes of measuring various physical qualities of a site or landscape, and then how to apply knowledge of ecology, natural processes, and human behavior and culture to assess the viability of potential design uses and forms. The material addressed will include land measurement and measurement systems, physiography and landform, soils, hydrology, climate, and plant, animal and human ecology. A variety of manual and computer techniques for data collection, analysis and synthesis of natural and cultural systems information will be explored. The course will concentrate on the comparison of synthesis techniques and their use in land use and site design decision-making. Occasional local field trips will be utilized. Fall.
                      Prerequisites: LSA 182, LSA 226, LSA 227 and LSA 311 (or their equivalent) with grades of "C" or better, or permission of instructor.

                      • (5) Section 01 - Land Arch Dsgn Studio I (#20490)
                        View Textbook Information
                          MWF 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Marshall 103 BRYANT
                          MWF 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Marshall 103 HAWKS

                      LSA 333 - Plants Materials (2)

                      One hour of lecture followed by three hours of field identification lab per week. Course provides an introduction to the identification, site requirements, natural and cultural history, community ecology, and landscape value of native and exotic woody and herbaceous plant materials typical of landscape architectural practice. Field identification labs include on-campus site walks and trips to local gardens, arboreta and natural areas to demonstrate the use of plants in designed and ecological settings. Fall.

                      • (2) Section 01 - Plant Materials (#20813)
                        View Textbook Information
                          M 10:35 am-11:30 pm Marshall 212 FERLOW
                        LA sophomores only
                          M 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Marshall RTBA DAVIDHEISER
                      • (2) Section 02 - Plant Materials (#20948)
                        View Textbook Information
                          M 10:35 am-11:30 am Marshall 212 FERLOW
                        LA sophomores only
                          W 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Marshall RTBA DAVIDHEISER
                      • (2) Section 03 - Plant Materials (#21138)
                        View Textbook Information
                          M 10:35 am-11:30 am Marshall 212 FERLOW
                        FNRM students only
                          Th 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Marshall RTBA DAVIDHEISER

                      LSA 422 - Landscape Architectural Design Studio III (5)

                      Seven hours of studio and one hour of lecture per week. This course introduces and applies concepts urban and regional planning, environmental planning, and landscape ecology, in the context of large-scale landscape architectural, community, and urban design. Emphasis will be placed upon the application of appropriate technologies and strategies to foster environmentally and economically sustainable community forms, as well as greater environmental and social equity. Occasional field trips to illustrate various design solutions. (Student field trip and materials expenses $300-$400). Spring.
                      Prerequisites: LSA 327 with a minimum grade of "C" or better, or permission of instructor.

                      • (5) Section 01 - Land Arch Dsgn Studio III (#19834)
                        View Textbook Information
                          MWF 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Marshall 316 FERNANDEZ
                          MWF 2:15 pm-5:05 pm Marshall 316 GAVITT

                      LSA 424 - Preparation for Off-Campus Design Thesis Studio (1)

                      One hour of lecture and discussion per week. The initial orientation and exploration of suitable landscape architecture or environmental studies topics for study during LSA 460. Students will tentatively select topics, form off-campus groups and be assigned a faculty advisor. Fall.
                      Prerequisite: Senior BLA standing, or permission of instructor.

                      LSA 433 - Planting Design and Practice (3)

                      Two hours of lecture and three hours of lab/studio exercises per week. This course concentrates on the ecological, aesthetic and technical considerations of woody and herbaceous plant use in landscape architectural design. Concepts covered include ecological relationships among plants, cultural requirements of plants, nursery production, planting design and composition, planting plans and specifications, and plant establishment and maintenance. Course utilizes field trips to gardens, arboreta and natural areas to demonstrate planting design concepts. Fall.
                      Prerequisite: LSA 333 or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both LSA 433 and LSA 633.

                      • (3) Section 01 - Planting Design&Practice (#20480)
                        View Textbook Information
                          MW 11:40 am-12:35 pm Marshall 111 REEDER
                          MW 11:40 am-12:35 pm Marshall 111 BECK

                      LSA 458 - Off-Campus Design Thesis Studio: Faculty Advisor Visit, Weekly Reports and Field Studies (4)

                      Twelve hours of individual field study per week conducted in an international or domestic location. Short field studies executed through on-site observation, sketching and analysis exercises. Study progress is communicated through weekly reports to an advisor and presented during the advisorís visit, the fifth week of the Off-Campus semester. Summer or Fall.
                      Prerequisites: LSA 423 and LSA 425 with a minimum grade of ďCĒ. Co-requisites: LSA 459, LSA 460.

                      LSA 459 - Off-Campus Design Thesis Studio: Design Journal and Project Notebook (4)

                      Twelve hours of individual field study per week conducted in an international or domestic location. Field observations and travel experiences documented through daily graphic and narrative entries in a design journal/sketchbook. Thesis project studies and research documented through daily entries in a project notebook. Summer or Fall.
                      Prerequisites: LSA 423 and LSA 425 with a minimum grade of ďCĒ. Co-requisites: LSA 458, LSA 460.

                      LSA 460 - Off-Campus Design Thesis Studio: Thesis Project (7)

                      Twenty-one hours of individual field research and studio per week conducted in an international or domestic location. The completion of a thesis project as delineated in a proposal prepared by the student and approved by the Off-Campus faculty advisor in LSA 425. Summer or Fall.
                      Prerequisites: LSA 423 and LSA 425 with a minimum grade of "C". Co-requisites: LSA 458 and LSA 459.

                      LSA 480 - Seminar in Urban Design (3)

                      Three hours of seminar per week. This course is an exploration of literature and case studies that address the history, theories, principles and practice of 19th and 20th century North American and European urban design. The format includes readings, discussion and presentations, papers, and a three-day field trip. Fall.
                      Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both LSA 480 and LSA 680.
                      Professor consent is required to register for this course.

                      LSA 495 - Undergraduate Experience in College Teaching (1-3)

                      Undergraduate Experience in College Teaching. An opportunity for 4th year senior or 5th year students to gain experience in fully supervised, college-level teaching similar to what they can expect to perform as a graduate teaching assistant. Students assist the course instructor in the preparation and presentation of studio or lecture material in an undergraduate course. A maximum of 6 credit hours of LSA 495 and 3 credit hours relating to any single assisted course. Fall, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite(s): 4th year senior or 5th year standing, a grade of B or higher in course being assisted, consent of instructor and minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0.
                      Prerequisite(s): 4th year senior or 5th year standing, a grade of B or higher in course being assisted, consent of instructor and minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0.

                      LSA 496 - Special Topics in Landscape Architecture (1-6)

                      One to three hours of class meetings per week. Special topics of current interest to undergraduate students in landscape architecture and related fields. A detailed course subject description will be presented as a topic area is identified and developed. Fall and Spring.
                      Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for the same topic in LSA 496 and LSA 696.

                      • (3) Section 02 - Food Systems Planning & Design (#27720)
                        View Textbook Information
                          Tu 5:00 pm-7:50 pm Marshall 327 POTTEIGER

                      LSA 498 - Introductory Research Problem (1-3)

                      Guided study of a selection of problems relating to landscape architecture and environmental design. Emphasis on study procedure and methods employed. Enrollment at periodic intervals throughout the semester. Fall, Spring and Summer.
                      Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

                      LSA 499 - Undergraduate Landscape Architecture Internship (1-12)

                      LSA 499. Undergraduate Landscape Architecture Internship. Supervised office or field experience in a professional working environment. Fall, Spring and Summer. Prerequisites: BLA students only with an approved internship proposal.

                      LSA 500 - Digital Methods and Graphics I (3)

                      Three hours of lecture per week. Through active participation, students learn to produce 2D digital graphics and documents (posters, reports, presentations and e-docs). Content includes image processing and vector drawing; document assembly for print, viewing and electronic distribution; and coordination of workflow in team-based production settings. Credit will not be given for both LSA 300 and LSA 500. Fall.
                      Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Landscape Architecture, Environmental Interpretation or permission.

                      • (3) Section 01 - Digital Methods & Graphics I (#21290)
                        View Textbook Information
                          M 8:25 am-9:20 am Marshall 409 REUTER
                          W 8:00 am-10:00 am Marshall 303 REUTER

                      LSA 552 - Graphic Communication (3)

                      Two three-hour studios and one one-hour lecture per week. Studio time devoted to demonstrations, exercises, and projects focusing on sketching, drafting, drawing construction and rendering techniques used in the landscape architecture field. Introduction to drawing reproduction and technologies. Emphasis on skill development, use of graphics in the design process. Drawings, examinations and a final project constitute basis for grades. Fall.
                      Prerequisite: Graduate status in landscape architecture or permission of instructor.

                      LSA 600 - Design Studio I (4)

                      Nine hours of studio and one hour of lecture/discussion per week. The first in a sequence of studios focusing on the concepts, skills and methods of design. This course introduces students to the basic vocabulary of theoretical design principles, to the application and operation of these in the physical environment, and to the development of three-dimensional spatial concepts in community scale patterns. The requirements for the course include readings, examinations, field trips, design exercises and projects. Fall.
                      Prerequisite: Graduate status in landscape architecture or permission of instructor.

                      LSA 606 - History of Landscape Architecture II (3)

                      Three hours of lecture per week. Survey of landscape design in the modern era, emphasizing the 20th century. Lectures and readings on significant movements, works and designers in the cultural, social and environmental context of the period. Additional seminar, reading and writing component. Fall.
                      Prerequisites: MLA status or permission of instructor Note: Credit will not be given for both LSA 406 and LSA 606.

                      LSA 611 - Natural Processes in Planning and Design (3)

                      Two hours and 40 minutes of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. This course addresses basic principles and processes of physical landscape systems with respect to their roles in landscape design and planning. Sources and uses of environmental data are discussed and illustrated. An emphasis is placed on landform, soil, slope, hydrology, climate and general ecological issues as common elements influencing landscape design and the land use decision making process. Fall.
                      Prerequisite: Graduate status in landscape architecture or permission of instructor.

                      LSA 620 - Design Studio II--Advanced Site Design (4)

                      One hour of lecture and nine hours of studio per week. This course is the third in a sequence of landscape architectural design studios. It focuses on advanced issues in site design and on the integration of project programming and design development into the design process. Concentrations include detailed designing for site layout, grading, storm water management, interior and exterior planting, site furnishing, and site lighting. Design exploration and project communication techniques are pursued such as CAD, reprographics, and computer-based visual simulation. Course requirements include readings, field trips, exercises, and design projects. Fall.
                      Prerequisites: Graduate status in landscape architecture, LSA 601, LSA 611, LSA 615, or permission of instructor.

                      LSA 632 - Plants and Landscapes (2)

                      Five hours of instruction per week for eight weeks.This course provides an introduction to the identification and use of native and exotic plants typical of landscape architectural practice. It also introduces students to a range of landscape contexts ranging from natural areas to urban settings and establishes a foundation for the discussion of the social, historical and ecological themes and issues of each. Field trips required. Fall.
                      Prerequisite: Entering MLA status or permission of the instructor.

                      LSA 633 - Planting Design and Practice (3)

                      Two hours of lecture and three hours of lab/studio exercises per week. This course concentrates on the ecological, aesthetic and technical considerations of woody and herbaceous plant use in landscape architectural design. Concepts covered include ecological relationships among plants, cultural requirements of plants, nursery production, planting design and composition, planting plans and specifications, and plant establishment and maintenance. Course utilizes field trips to gardens, arboreta and natural areas to demonstrate planting design concepts. Students complete a final research project that explores current and emerging trends in the use of plant materials in landscape architectural design. Fall.
                      Prerequisite: LSA 632 or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both LSA 433 and LSA 633.

                      • (3) Section 01 - Planting Design&Practice (#20429)
                        View Textbook Information
                          MW 11:40 am-12:35 pm Marshall 111 REEDER
                          Tu 2:00 pm-4:50 pm Marshall 409 REEDER

                      LSA 650 - Behavioral Factors of Community Design (3)

                      Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. An introduction to the contribution of the behavioral sciences to community design and planning is provided. Readings and discussions concern both theoretical and methodological aspects. Case studies are used to illustrate a variety of current behavioral science applications. Course assignments familiarize the student with basic behavioral science methods including questionnaires, observations and interviews. A final project provides an opportunity to synthesize course materials. Fall or Spring.
                      Prerequisite: Graduate status in landscape architecture or permission of instructor.

                      • (3) Section 01 - Behavr Factor/Comm Desgn (#20491)
                        View Textbook Information
                          TuTh 8:00 am-9:20 am Bray 315 KING
                        PREREQ:MLA STATUS OR CONSENT

                      LSA 680 - Seminar in Urban Design (3)

                      Three hours of seminar per week. This course is an exploration of literature and case studies that address the history, theories, principles and practice of 19th and 20th century North American and European urban design. The format includes readings, discussion, oral presentations, papers and a three-day field trip. This course fulfills the seminar requirement for students in the Community Design and Planning area of study. Fall.
                      Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both LSA 480 and LSA 680.
                      Professor consent is required to register for this course.

                      LSA 696 - Special Topics in Landscape Architecture (1-6)

                      One to three hours of class meetings per week. Special topics of current interest to graduate students in landscape architecture and related fields. A detailed course subject description will be presented as a topic area is identified and developed. Additional readings, supplementary research and writing assignments. Fall and Spring.
                      Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for the same topic in LSA 496 and LSA 696.

                      • (3) Section 02 - Food Systems Planning & Design (#27721)
                        View Textbook Information
                          Tu 5:00 pm-7:50 pm Marshall 327 POTTEIGER

                      LSA 697 - Topics and Issues of Landscape Architecture (1)

                      Two hours of lecture and discussion every other week. Topics for discussion are selected to acquaint the entering graduate student with a generalized view and current issues facing landscape architects. Fall.
                      Pre- or co-requisite: Audit LSA 220 and graduate status in landscape architecture or permission of instructor.

                      LSA 699 - Landscape Architecture Internship (1-12)

                      Internships provide students with a supervised field experience to apply and extend their academic abilities in a professional working environment. Enrollment is possible at various times during the semester. Fall, Spring and Summer.
                      Prerequisites: Fast Track BLA/MS status and written approval of an internship contract by major professor, curriculum director and field supervisor.

                      LSA 700 - Design Studio V - Integrative Studio (4)

                      One hour of lecture and nine hours of studio per week. This studio requires the integration of design/planning processes, research methods and information, and technical skills through focus on large-scale, community-based or multicommunity-based projects. Studio work will require individual and teamwork, as well as consideration of multidisciplinary contributions and interdisciplinary work. This studio is the final studio for all MLA students. Fall.
                      Prerequisite: LSA 621 or permission of instructor.

                      LSA 760 - Off-Campus Experiential Studio (12)

                      This course involves research, internship or self-directed study abroad with faculty guidance. Activities include field analysis, research, documentation, or directed fieldwork based on faculty-approved student proposals. Immersion in the host culture is a required aspect of this course. A final report is required. The course is open to MLA and MS candidates. Summer and Fall.
                      Prerequisites: LSA 625 and LSA 799 with a grade of B or better. Note: Credit will not be granted for both LSA 460 and LSA 760.
                      Professor consent is required to register for this course.

                      LSA 798 - Research Problem (1-12)

                      Special study of assigned problems relating to landscape architecture or planning, with emphasis on critical thinking. Fall, Spring and Summer.
                      Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

                      LSA 799 - Capstone or Thesis Proposal Development (3)

                      One hour of lecture/seminar and two hours of tutorial per week. Students develop and defend a proposal for their MLA capstone projects or MS thesis. Fall or Spring.
                      Prerequisite: LSA 640 or permission of instructor.

                      LSA 800 - Capstone Studio (6)

                      One hour of lecture/seminar and 15 hours of studio per week. Students complete an academic landscape architecture investigation or professional-level project. Public presentations and comprehensive project documentation are required. Grades on an "S/U" basis. This is the final MLA studio prior to graduation. Fall or Spring.
                      Prerequisite: LSA 799.

                      LSA 898 - Professional Experience (1-12)

                      A supervised external professional work experience that satisfies Option 2 of the masterís study integration requirement. Graded on an "S/U" basis. Fall, Spring and Summer. Prerequisites: Formation of committee, approval of proposed experience by committee, and the sponsor of the professional experience.

                      LSA 899 - Master's Thesis Research (1-12)

                      Research and independent study for the masterís degree and thesis. Graded on an "S/U" basis. Fall, Spring and Summer.

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                      MCR

                      MCR 480 - Fundamentals of Microscopy (3)

                      Three hours of lecture/demonstration per week. Introduction to light microscopy, electron microscopy,atomic force, confocal, Raman, Near Field Optical, Correlative and other microscopic methods and their newest applications. Light microscopic techniques include brightfield, phase contrast, polarized light, Nomarski, Kohler illumination. Imaging and recording methods. Fall.
                      Credit will not be granted for both CME 480 and CME 680

                      MCR 484 - Scanning Electron Microscopy (3)

                      Two hours of lecture/three hours of laboratory/ demonstration per week. Theory and operation of the scanning electron microscope, awareness of specimen preparation techniques, digital imaging, and interpretation of micrographs. Fall.

                      MCR 580 - Microtechnique of Wood (3)

                      Three hours of laboratory per week. Instruction on the use of the sliding mcirotome to slice thin sections of wood for light microscopy and for sample surface preparation of wood for scanning electron microscopy. Care of the microtome blade, staining of wood sections and preparation of micrsocope slides. Fall or Spring
                      Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
                      Professor consent is required to register for this course.

                      MCR 680 - Fundamentals of Microscopy (3)

                      Three hours of lecture/demonstration per week. Introduction to light microscopy, electron microscopy,atomic force, confocal, Raman, Near Field Optical, Correlative and other microscopic methods and their newest applications. Light microscopic techniques include brightfield, phase contrast, polarized light, Nomarski, Kohler illumination. Imaging and recording methods. Fall.

                      MCR 682 - Transmission Electron Microscopy for Nanoparticle Research (2)

                      Two hours of lecture/laboratory/demonstration plus two hours of individual laboratory per week. Theory and operation of the transmission electron microscope, specimen preparation for nanaopartical imaging, photographic technique and interpretation of micrographs. Fall or Spring.

                      Professor consent is required to register for this course.

                      • (2) Section 01 - TEM for Nanoparticle Rsrch (#21286)
                        View Textbook Information
                          TBA Day TBA SMITH,R.P
                        Professor consent is required to register for this section.

                      MCR 783 - Operation of the Scanning Electron Microscope (3)

                      Two hours of lecture/three hours of demonstration/ laboratory per week. Theory and operation of the scanning electron microscope, including specimen preparation, digital imaging, and interpretation of micrographs. Fall.

                      Professor consent is required to register for this course.

                      MCR 785 - Scanning Electron Microscopy (5)

                      Two hours of lecture/two hours demonstration/laboratory per week. Ten hours of independent laboratory experience per week. Theory and operation of the scanning electron microscope, including specimen preparation, digital imaging, and interpretation of micrographs. Preparation of a portfolio of biological and non-biological specimens demonstrating a variety of techniques. Fall.
                      Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
                      Professor consent is required to register for this course.

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                      PSE

                      PSE 132 - Introduction to Process Engineering I (1)

                      One hour lecture per week or three-hour lab/field trip per week. Introduction to process engineering as a field of study and career path. Topics covered include engineering ethics, laboratory and process safety, resumes and interviewing, and teamwork. Fall.
                      Note: Credit will not be granted for both BPE 132 and PSE 132.

                      PSE 200 - Introduction to Papermaking (3)

                      Three hours of lecture per week. Historical and commercial consideration of the paper industry. Topics include wood handling, pulping, stock furnish, stock preparation and paper machine operation. Introductory discussions of papermaking technology, materials and paper making processes including environmental aspects. Fall.

                      PSE 202 - Pulp and Paper Laboratory Skills (1)

                      Three hours of laboratory per week provide a working knowledge of fundamental papermaking concepts. "Survival" skills learned enable students to perform well in subsequent PSE courses as well as summer employment. Operations and skills include: pulp preparation and analysis, papermaking, paper testing, report writing and team work. Spring.
                      Pre- or co-requisite: PSE 200 (concurrent registration).

                      PSE 296 - Special Topics in Engineering (1-3)

                      Provides experimental, interdisciplinary, or special coursework at the freshman and sophomore levels within the field of environmental resources engineering. Subject matter and course format vary from semester to semester and section to section. Fall and Spring.

                        PSE 304 - Professional Experience/Synthesis (2)

                        Students implement the theory and practice of their major by working for a company, typically during the summer preceding enrolling in the course. The internship should be a minimum of twelve weeks of full-time experience. Course expectations include a written report, an oral presentation, and a supervisor evaluation. Fall and Spring.
                        Pre- or co-requisites: PSE 133 or BPE 133; PSE 200 or BPE 300; PSE 370; permission of instructor.

                        PSE 305 - Co-op Experience (2)

                        One semester full-time pulp or paper mill experience. Work experience as an engineering intern on company-assigned projects. Traditionally, the student works for a semester and adjacent summer also taking PSE 304. The student must submit a comprehensive report and give a presentation to fulfill this requirement. Fall and Spring.
                        Pre- or co-requisites: PSE 300, PSE 302.

                        PSE 370 - Principles of Mass and Energy Balance (3)

                        Three hours of lecture per week. Conservation of mass and energy applied to steady-state and dynamic process units and systems. Problem analysis and solution; computational techniques. Thermodynamic data and their use; real vs. perfect gases; steam properties; psychrometry. Fall.
                        Pre- or co-requisite(s): PHY 211, MAT 296 (or concurrent), FCH 152.

                        PSE 371 - Fluid Mechanics (3)

                        Three hours of lecture per week. Fluid statics. Principles of mass, energy and momentum balance. Bernoulliís equation. Application to pipe flows, flow measurement and porous media. Movement of particles in fluid media. Rheology of fluids and suspensions typical in the pulp and paper industry (pulps, black liquor, etc.). Filtration and sedimentation of fibrous and particulate suspensions. Characteristics of pumps. Flow systems with economic considerations. Fall.
                        Prerequisites: PHY 211, FCH 152, MAT 296 or APM296. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 371 and PSE 571.

                        PSE 438 - Biorenewable fibrous and nonfibrous products (3)

                        Three hours of lecture per week. Three credit-hour advanced science course through the topics in the production and properties of lignocellulosic products. Topics cover fibrous products including different paper grades, nanocellulose and cellulose derivatives, and nonfibrous products including products of enzymatic and/or chemical conversion of biomass constituents. Spring and/or Fall.
                        Prerequisite(s): PSE 465 Fiber and Paper Properties and/or PSE 223 Introduction to Lignocellulosics or consent of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 438 and PSE 638.

                        • (3) Section 01 - Biorenew Fibrous&Nonfibrs Prod (#24659)
                          View Textbook Information
                            TuTh 5:00 pm-6:20 pm Walter 210 BUJANOVIC

                        PSE 465 - Fiber and Paper Properties (3)

                        Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Evaluation, study, and discussion of the physical, optical, and chemical properties of fibers, non-fibrous paper additives, and paper. The interrelationships between papermaking fibers, nonfibrous additives, and manufacturing methods, and their effects on the final quality of paper are discussed in correlation with different test methods. Fall or Spring.
                        Prerequisite: PSE202 Introduction to Papermaking

                        • (3) Section 01 - Fiber & Paper Properties (#19872)
                          View Textbook Information
                            MWF 11:40 am-12:35 pm Walter 211 BUJANOVIC
                            MTuWTh 2:00 pm-3:30 pm Walter LAB BUJANOVIC

                        PSE 477 - Process Control (3)

                        Three hours of lecture per week. Presents an introduction to the principles of process control. Linear analysis, LaPlace transforms, and nonlinear simulation are presented and applied to feedback, and feedforward control. Examples of process simulation, accuracy and stability of control are drawn from paper industry processes. Fall.
                        Prerequisite: APM 485 or equivalent. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 477 and PSE 677.

                        PSE 481 - Engineering Design (3)

                        Three hours of lecture per week. Design-project procedure; data sources and development. Application of simulation and computer-aided design to process synthesis and plant layout. Formulation and solution of original design problems. Fall.
                        Prerequisites: PSE 371, PSE 372, PSE 480. Pre- or co-requisite: BPE 335.

                        • (3) Section 01 - Proc/Plnt Dsgn II:Synthes (#19874)
                          View Textbook Information
                            M 5:15 pm-8:05 pm Walter 210 CHATTERJEE
                            M 5:15 pm-8:05 pm Walter 210 IRIBARNE

                        PSE 498 - Research Problem (1-4)

                        The student is assigned a research problem in pulping, bleaching, refining, additives, quality control of paper or paper products, or chemical engineering. The student must make a systematic survey of available literature on the assigned problem. Emphasis is on application of correct research technique rather than on the results of commercial importance. The information obtained from the literature survey, along with the data developed as a result of the investigation, is to be presented as a technical report. Fall, Spring and Summer.

                        Professor consent is required to register for this course.

                        PSE 570 - Principles of Mass and Energy Balances (3)

                        Three hours of lecture per week. Conservation of mass and energy applied to steady-state and dynamic process units and systems. Problem analysis and solution; computational techniques. Thermodynamic data and their use; real vs. perfect gases; steam properties; psychrometry. Computer simulation of steady and non-steady state process systems. Fall.
                        Prerequisites: Physics, Calculus, and General Chemistry. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 370 and PSE 570.

                        PSE 571 - Fluid Mechanics (3)

                        Three hours of lecture per week. Fluid statics. Principles of mass, energy and momentum balance. Bernoulliís equation. Application to pipe flows, flow measurement and porous media. Movement of particles in fluid media. Rheology of fluids and suspensions typical in the pulp and paper industry (pulps, black liquor, etc.) Filtration and sedimentation of fibrous and particulate suspensions. Characteristics of pumps. Flow systems with economic considerations. Analysis of some papermaking operations such as drainage, dewatering, vacuum dewatering and wet pressing. Fall.
                        Prerequisites: Physics, Chemistry, Calculus. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 371 and PSE 571.

                        PSE 596 - Special Topics (1-3)

                        Lectures, conferences, discussions and laboratory. Topics in environmental and resource engineering not covered in established courses. Designed for the beginning graduate student or selected upper-division undergraduate. Fall and/or Spring.

                        PSE 638 - Biorenewable Fibrous and Nonfibrous Products (3)

                        Three hours of lecture per week. Three credit-hour advanced science course through the topics in the production and properties of biorenewable products for graduate students. Topics include fibrous products such as different paper grades; printing and writing paper, paper board, tissue, and specialty papers, and nanocellulose and cellulose derivatives and nonfibrous products such as hemicelluloses, lignin, pectins, extractives and products of enzymatic and chemical conversion of carbohydrates. Independent academic research component required. Spring and/or Fall.
                        Prerequisite(s): PSE 465 Fiber and paper Properties and/or, PSE 223 Introduction to Lignocellulosics or consent of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 438 and PSE 638.

                        • (3) Section 01 - Biorenew Fibrous&Nonfibrs Prod (#27660)
                          View Textbook Information
                            TuTh 5:00 pm-6:20 pm Walter 210 BUJANOVIC

                        PSE 665 - Fiber and Paper Properties (3)

                        Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Advanced science course in evaluation, study, and discussion of the physical, optical, and chemical properties of fibers, non-fibrous paper additives, and paper. The interrelationships between fibers and nonfibrous paper additives, and manufacturing methods, and their effects on the final paper quality of paper are discussed. Independent academic research required. Spring and/or Fall.
                        Prerequisite: PSE 202 Introduction to Papermaking. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 465 and PSE 665.

                        • (3) Section 01 - Fiber & Paper Properties (#20931)
                          View Textbook Information
                            MWF 11:40 am-12:35 pm Walter 211 BUJANOVIC
                            MTuWTh 2:00 pm-3:30 pm Walter LAB BUJANOVIC

                        PSE 677 - Process Control (3)

                        Three hours of lecture per week. Presents an introduction to the principles of process control. Linear analysis, LaPlace transforms, and nonlinear simulation are presented and applied to feedback, and feedforward control. Examples of process simulation, accuracy and stability of control are drawn from paper industry processes. Process identification using numerical techniques and MATLAB. Fall.
                        Prerequisite: Differential Equations. Note: Credit will not be granted for both PSE 477 and PSE 677.

                        PSE 797 - Seminar (1-3)

                        Discussion of assigned topics in the fields related to Paper Science Engineering. Spring and Fall.

                        PSE 798 - Research in Paper Science Engineering (1-12)

                        Independent research topics in Paper Science Engineering. Fall, Spring or Summer.
                        Credit hours to be arranged.

                        PSE 898 - Professional Experience/Synthesis (1-6)

                        A supervised, documented professional work experience in the Master of Professional Studies degree program. Fall, Spring, or Summer.
                        Pre- or co-requisite(s): Approval of proposed study plan by advisor, Faculty, and any sponsoring organization.

                        PSE 899 - Master's Thesis Research (1-12)

                        Research and independent study for the master's thesis. Fall, Spring or Summer.
                        Credit hours to be arranged.

                        PSE 999 - Doctoral Thesis Research (1-12)

                        Research and independent study for the doctoral dissertation. Fall, Spring or Summer.
                        Credit hours to be arranged.

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                        SRE

                        SRE 225 - Physics of Energy (3)

                        Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to the principles of physics and their application in conventional and sustainable energy systems. This course covers the fundamentals of mechanical, chemical, electrical, thermal, and nuclear energy, including efficiency of energy conversions. Fall.
                        Prerequisite: APM 103 or equivalent and enrollment in the Sustainable Energy Management major, or permission of instructor

                        SRE 325 - Energy Systems (3)

                        Three hours of lecture per week. The Energy Systems course provides an interdisciplinary overview of human-dominated energy systems. A variety of topics will be covered to introduce students to fossil fuel-based, renewable, and other energy systems, including: energy supply and consumption, extractive approaches, resource demands, environmental impacts and energy security, and quantitative methods related to energy metrics. Students will use systems thinking to evaluate existing and emerging energy systems. The course involves occasional field trips. Fall.
                        Prerequisites: SRE 225 or equivalent introductory physics course, and FCH 110 and FCH 111 or equivalent one semester of introductory chemistry with lab. Credits will not be granted for SRE 325 and SRE 525 (both undergraduate and graduate versions of the same course).

                        • (3) Section 01 - Energy Systems (#27769)
                          View Textbook Information
                            MF 12:45 pm-1:40 pm Bray 321 FORTIER
                            W 12:45 pm-3:35 pm Bray 321 FORTIER

                        SRE 416 - Sustainable Energy Policy (3)

                        Three hours of lecture per week. Evaluation of the sustainable energy field as it relates to policy. Primary emphasis on the following topics: policy concerns that motivated the development and expansion of sustainable energy, a history of the policy interactions between sustainable energy pathways, and controversies that have arisen from these interactions and their effects.
                        Prerequisites:SRE 325, SRE 335. Corequisite: SRE 422

                        SRE 422 - Energy Markets and Regulation (3)

                        Three hours of lecture/discussion concerning markets and regulation of energy. Topics include: the economics of energy markets, industry restructuring, and thedevelopment of markets for energy efficiency and renewable power. The role and impacts of energy regulation on markets will also be examined. Fall.
                        Prerequisites: SRE 325 Energy Systems Note: Credits will not be granted for SRE 422 and SRE 622 (both undergraduate and graduate versions of the same course).

                        SRE 450 - Renewable Energy Capstone Planning (1)

                        One hour group meeting every two weeks. This course will afford the student an opportunity to select a topic, in conjunction with the instructor, for detail investigation in Capstone II. Each student will work individually with the instructor to arrive at a feasible project. Fall
                        Prerequisites: SRE 325, SRE 335 Corequisite: SRE 422

                        SRE 525 - Energy Systems (3)

                        Three hours of lecture per week. The Energy Systems course provides an interdisciplinary overview of human-dominated energy systems. A variety of topics will be covered to introduce students to fossil fuel-based, renewable, and other energy systems, including: energy supply and consumption, extractive approaches, resource demands, environmental impacts and energy security, and quantitative methods related to energy metrics. Students will use systems thinking to evaluate existing and emerging energy systems. The course involves occasional field trips. Students taking SRE 525 will be required to complete additional work and held to higher expectations than those taking SRE 325. Fall.
                        Prerequisites: Undergraduate courses in introductory physics and introductory chemistry. Note:Credits will not be granted for SRE 325 and SRE 525 (both undergraduate and graduate versions of the same course).

                        • (3) Section 01 - Energy Systems (#27778)
                          View Textbook Information
                            MF 12:45 pm-1:40 pm Bray 321 FORTIER
                            W 12:45 pm-3:35 pm Bray 321 FORTIER

                        SRE 622 - Energy Markets and Regulation (3)

                        Three hours of lecture/discussion concerning markets and regulation of energy. Topics include: the economics of energy markets, industry restructuring, and the development of markets for energy efficiency and renewable power. The role and impacts of energy regulation on markets will also be examined. Fall.
                        Prerequisites: SRE 325 Energy Systems or equivalent or permission of instructor Note: Credits will not be granted for SRE 422 and SRE 622 (both undergraduate and graduate versions of the same course).

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