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Courses offered in Construction Management and Engineering (CME)

CME

CME 132 Orientation Seminar: Sustainable Construction Management and Engineering (1)
One hour of lecture and discussion per week. Introduction to campus resources available to ensure academic success in the area of Sustainable Construction Management and Engineering. Fall.

CME 151 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Financial accounting concepts that aid entrepreneurs, managers, investors, and creditors in planning, operating, and analyzing a business. Emphasis is on interpretation of financial statements. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): none.

CME 202 Introduction to Professional Communications (1)
Three hours of lab per week. Introduction to intermediate-level use and understanding of software for word processing, spreadsheet analysis, and database management. Focused on developing the ability to prepare reports including preparation of documents, data analysis, and written presentations. Fall.
Pre- or co-requisite(s): none.

CME 215 Sustainable Construction (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Overview of sustainable design and construction concepts and practices. The emergence of green building, issues, and rating systems. Sources of chemicals in buildings, indoor air quality, and human comfort. Basic energy principles and energy-efficient technologies. Selection of materials. Role of the contractor in the management and construction of green projects. Spring.

CME 226 Statics and Mechanics of Materials (4)
Four hours of lecture/discussion per week. Equilibrium systems of forces in two and three dimensions. Analysis of structural components for stresses and deformations. Stability and design of beams and columns made of common engineering materials. Design methods and safety considerations. Spring and Fall.
Prerequisite: Calculus I, Physics I.

CME 252 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introduction to the role of accounting information systems in measuring performance, influencing employee behavior, and facilitating planning decisions such as what products and services to offer, in which markets, and at what prices. Spring
Prerequisite(s): CME 151.

CME 255 Plan Interpretation and Quantity Takeoff (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introductory course in construction plan interpretation and quantity takeoff. Will address how to read and interpret construction plans and introduce basic quantity takeoff skills. Fall.

CME 303 Sustainable Construction Management and Engineering Internship (1 - 3)
Full or part-time employment with an organization that involves the student in an educational experience in a professional establishment. A resident faculty member must serve as the student’s academic sponsor. A study plan that describes the internship’s educational goals must be submitted prior to its commencement. Fall and Spring.
Prerequisite: Upper-division status.

CME 304 Environmental Performance Measures for Buildings (3)
An overview of how building rating systems for green construction have developed, their present application, and future directions for growth. The course will explore the process for development of individual standards, the different building certification systems that have been developed using these standards, and long-term development and code adoption of such certification systems.

CME 305 Sustainable Energy Systems for Buildings (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Exploration of construction management-related issues in creating a more sustainable energy use in our building stock. Integrating sustainable energy sources in construction as well as issues related to using energy more efficiently. Fall.

CME 306 Engineering Materials for Sustainable Construction (3)
Two hours of lecture/discussion per week and one lab per week. Introduction to the principal structural materials used for building construction and their engineering properties and environmental impacts. The production and performance of these materials will be explored through class discussion and laboratory experiments. The application of each of the materials during sustainable construction processes will be emphasized. Spring.

CME 322 Mechanical Processing (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Primary log reduction methods and industry practices. Lumber grading. Wood cutting principles. Machining practice in secondary wood-using industries. Experience in the operation of certain primary and secondary machining equipment. Fall.

CME 326 Fluid Treatment of Wood (3)
Two hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Basic wood-moisture relationships, wood shrinkage and swelling, permeability, thermal conductivity, wood drying and preservation treatments, and fire retardancy. Flow of fluids, heat and water vapor are treated as analogous phenomena related to the cellular structure of wood. Laboratory studies in relative humidity measurement, wood-moisture relations, relationships between wood permeability and drying and treatability, industrial wood drying, dry kiln operation and preservation treatments, and fire retardancy. Spring.
Prerequisite: CME 387 or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 326 and CME 682.

CME 327 Site Investigations and Solutions (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Principles of geotechnical engineering, site investigation methods, methods for improving sites, and the role of geotechnical engineering in construction contracts. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): none

CME 330 Building Code of New York State (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introduction to the Building Code that legally governs the design and construction of all building types within New York State. The course includes a basic understanding of the Code including history and origin, legal enforcement, basic definitions, and terminologies. Fall.

CME 331 Construction Safety (3)
Occupational Safety and Health Practices in the construction industry with coverage of the U. S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Regulations (CFR 1910 and 1926 Standards). Detailed study of Construction Safety and Hazardous Communications programs, personal protective equipment, tools, electrical power, ladders, and scaffolding, floor and wall openings, cranes and power equipment. Special problems related to concrete work, erection and demolition. OSHA 30 Hr. card earned. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 331 and CME 531.

CME 332 Mechanical and Electrical Equipment (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. The course introduces the basic concepts of mechanical systems design and construction for residential and commercial buildings. Simplified design and construction estimates are performed for heating, cooling, plumbing, sanitation, electrical, and lighting systems. Relevant code requirements are stressed. Fall.

CME 335 Cost Engineering (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Statistics, cost of money, rates of return, cash flow, budget development, cost tracking, productivity and progress, constructability and value engineering, change control and risk analysis. Fall.
Prerequisite: Upper division standing or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 335 and CME 535.

CME 342 Light Construction (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. An introduction to the construction process with an emphasis on the unique aspects of light construction. Introduces construction management principles related to material properties, building science, structural design, estimating, and scheduling. Fall.

CME 343 Construction Estimating (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Basic estimating/bidding theory and process. The processes for reviewing and interpreting contracts, specifications and blueprints and their role in the estimating/bidding process. How to perform a quantity takeoff, be able to create a final estimate/bid including the appropriate General Conditions and Markups. Several projects based upon the concepts are assigned on the material listed above as well as utilizing either a spreadsheet or Timberline Precision Computer Estimating. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): CME 255 Plan Interpretation and QTO or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 343 and CME 543.

CME 350 Construction Methods and Equipment (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. The study of production, methods of operation and costs of heavy construction equipment. Analysis of heavy construction operations. Economics of equipment use. The fundamentals of decision making involved in the selection of methods and equipment that will result in the most effective and efficient performance on a project. Spring.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 350 and CME 525.

CME 376 Decay of Wood Products (3)
Three hours of lecture/laboratory/demonstration per week. Degradation of wood by fungi and other biological agents. Emphasis on the effects of decay on wood properties, methods of decay detection in wood products and decay prevention. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): CME 386 or CME 387.

CME 387 Renewable Materials for Sustainable Construction (3)
Three hours of discussion, lecture and demonstration per week. Properties and uses of major structural construction materials. Identification and knowledge of the major wood species and their applications in construction. Fall.

CME 388 Wood and Fiber Identification Laboratory (2)
Six hours of laboratory per week. Wood and papermaking fiber identification using both gross and microscopic features. Fall.
Prerequisite: CME 387 to be taken concurrently or previously.

CME 389 Wood Identification Laboratory (1)
Three hours of laboratory per week. Identification of principal commercial timbers of United States on gross characteristics. Spring.
Prerequisite: CME 387.

CME 390 Fiber Identification Laboratory (1)
Three hours of laboratory per week. Identification of woody and nonwoody papermaking fibers. Spring.
Prerequisite: CME 387.

CME 400 Introduction to Forest Products (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Characteristics of the products of the forest tree and manufacture of wood products. Spring.

CME 404 Applied Structures (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion/demonstration per week. Applications of statics/mechanics to common engineering structures. Analysis and design of wood, concrete and steel systems considering sustainability and life-cycle analysis. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): CME 226, Statics and Mechanics of Materials.

CME 405 Building Information Modeling for Construction Management (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. An introduction to the basic concepts of building information modeling as a construction approach, and an exploration of its application to construction management. Emphasis on the use of building information modeling for estimation, scheduling, clash detection, and project communication. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): CME 255 Plan Interpretation and Quantity Takeoff. Co-requisite: CME 343 Construction Estimating.

CME 410 Computer-Aided Design and Drafting (3)
One-half hour lecture, two-and-one-half hours lab, and a minimum of six hours additional lab is required. This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of computer-aided design and drafting. It covers the commands needed to create a two-dimensional drawing, with particular emphasis on techniques used in the design profession applications. The requirements for the course include completing self-tutorials, creating drawings, and the completion of two major projects. Spring.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 410 and CME 610.

CME 422 Composite Materials for Sustainable Construction (3)
Two hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Properties, manufacture and design of multiphase materials. Applications and testing for service in sustainable construction systems and life-cycle analysis. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): CME 226, Statics and Mechanics of Materials and CME 387, Renewable Materials for Sustainable Construction.

CME 444 Materials Marketing (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Fundamentals of marketing forest products, building and construction industry materials, including products, markets, distribution, segmentation, pricing, promotion and sales. Specific focus is on the unique nature and issues of forest products and building materials; vertical and horizontal integration, distribution channels, market segmentation and product positioning strategies. Fall.
Prerequisite: FOR 207 Introduction to Economics or equivalent.

CME 453 Construction Planning and Scheduling (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. The use of common types of schedules: Gantt, Activity on Node, Precedence Diagram, PERT and Linear. Identification of activities and performance duration analyses of these activities. Updating of schedules, resource planning and assignment, cost planning and scheduling are all covered. Schedule development is performed both manually and with industry-accepted software. Fall.
Prerequisite(s): CME 343 or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 453 and CME 653.

CME 454 Construction Project Management (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion and three hours of laboratory per week. How to define and properly identify company organizational structures and project delivery systems. Integration of estimating, bidding, scheduling and cost control into the management process. Safety, quality control, value engineering, procurement, labor relations and insurance and bonding requirements as integral parts of a construction project. Projects based upon Expedition project management software. Spring.
Prerequisites:CME 343, CME 453, senior standing or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 454 and CME 654.

CME 455 Construction Contracts and Specifications (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. The types of contracts used in the construction industry. Analysis of the contractor, designer and owner duties and obligations as determined by the construction contract documents. Study of concepts, language, formats and procedures for project manual organization practice and the general conditions of the contract for construction. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): Upper division standing or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 455 and CME 658.

CME 480 Fundamentals of Microscopy (3)
Three hours of lecture/demonstration per week. Introduction to light microscopy, electron microscopy, atomic force, confocal, Raman, Near Field Optical, Correlative and other microscopic methods and their newest applications. Light microscopic techniques include brightfield, phase contrast, polarized light, Nomarski, Kohler illumination. Imaging and recording methods. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 480 and CME 680.

CME 487 Wood Chemistry and Physics (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Wood chemistry and physical properties described in relation to the practical function of wood products. The methodologies used to explore these relationships; including microscopy, mechanical testing, and chemical analysis and their interpretation. Fall.
Prerequisite: CME 387.

CME 488 Professional Construction Project Management Presentation Seminar (2)
Two hours of lecture/seminar/preparation per week. A preparatory course for participation in a professional construction management proposal process including proposal development and professional presentation of the proposal. The course culminates in participation at a regional construction management competition sponsored by the Associated Schools of Construction Region 1. Fall.
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and permission of the instructor.

CME 497 Senior Ethics Seminar (3)
One hour of lecture/discussion per week. Student papers/ presentations are directed toward professional issues in ethics and career preparation, Fall.
Prerequisite(s): Senior status in SCME.

CME 498 Research or Design Problem (1 - 3)
Conferences, library, laboratory and/or field research on a specific problem in wood products engineering. Written report required. Fall, Spring and Summer.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and advisor.

CME 504 Environmental Performance Measures for Building (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Environmental Performance Measures for Buildings - Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Overview of building rating systems for green construction, their development, present application, and future directions for growth. Explores the process for development of individual standards, different building certification systems that have been developed using these standards, and long-term development and code adoption of such certification systems. An experiment-based, analytical, or evaluative project is required. Fall
Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing, or upper‐division standing with approval of instructor. Note: Credit will not be given for both CME 304 and CME 504.

CME 505 Sustainable Energy Systems for Buildings (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Exploration of construction management-related issues in creating a more sustainable energy use in our building stock. Integrating sustainable energy sources in construction as well as issues related to using energy more efficiently. An experiment-based, analytical, or evaluative project is required. Fall
Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing, or upper‐division standing with approval of instructor. Note: Credit will not be given for both CME 305 and CME 505.

CME 525 Construction Methods and Equipment (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Analysis of heavy construction operations and related environmental concerns. Production calculations, means and methods selection and operating costs of heavy construction equipment are addressed. The economics of equipment use are analyzed. The use of a digitizer in earthwork quantity takeoff is explored. The outcome of the course is to select the most cost efficient and performance efficient method and equipment. A term paper is required. Spring.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 525 and CME 350.

CME 531 Construction Safety (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Occupational Safety and Health practices in the construction industry. An overview of the US Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Regulations, 29 CFR 1910 and 29 CFR 1926. Comprehensive review of: general safety and health requirements, hazard communication, confined space entry, lockout/tagout programs, workplace violence, personal protective equipment, fire protection, signs and barricades, rigging, small tools – hand and power, welding and cutting, electrical, fall protection, scaffolding, cranes, mobile equipment, excavation and trenching, steel erection, stairways and ladders and permissible exposure limits. A term paper is required. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 531 and CME 331.

CME 532 Mechanical and Electrical Equipment (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. The course introduces the basic concepts of mechanical systems design and construction for residential and commercial buildings. Simplified design and construction estimates are performed for heating, cooling, plumbing, sanitation, electrical, and lighting systems. Relevant code requirements are stressed. An experiment-based project is required. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be given for both CME 332 and CME 532.

CME 535 Cost Engineering (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Statistics, cost of money, rates of return, cash flow, budget development, cost tracking, productivity and progress, constructability and value engineering, change control and risk analysis.
Prerequisite: Upper division standing or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 535 and CME 335.

CME 543 Construction Estimating (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Definition and explanation of estimating/bidding theory and process. The processes for reviewing and interpreting contracts, specifications and blueprints as well as their role in the estimating/bidding process. Perform a quantity takeoff. Create a final estimate/bid, including the appropriate General Conditions and Markups. Several projects based on the concepts listed above as well as utilizing either a spreadsheet or Timberline Precision Estimating. A term paper describing how the relevant topics of the course fit a specific industry application, and production of an additional project based on Timberline Precision estimating software or equivalent are required. Spring.
Prerequisites: CME 255 Plan Interpretation and QTO or basic estimating experience and permission of the instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 543 and CME 343.

CME 565 Sustainable Innovations in Residential Construction (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Principles of sustainable residential construction; the adaptation of biological, ecological, and cultural elements into building performance standards, practical building specifications, standards and systems. Spring.

CME 580 Microtechnique of Wood (3)
Three hours of laboratory per week. Instruction on the use of the sliding microtome to slice thin sections of wood for light microscopy and for sample surface preparation of wood for scanning electron microscopy. Care of the microtome blade, staining of wood sections and preparation of microscope slides. Fall or Spring.
Pre- or co-requisite: permission of instructor.

CME 585 Light Microscopy for Research Applications (3)
Two hours of lecture/three hours of laboratory per week. Principles of light microscopy and photomicrographic digital imagery using Spot camera and Image Pro 7.0 software. Extensive laboratory component. Spring.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CME 587 Renewable Materials for Sustainable Construction (3)
Three hours of discussion, lecture and demonstration per week. Properties and uses of wood and other renewable materials as a major construction materials. Identification and knowledge of the major wood species and their applications in construction. Evaluation of current practices and materials. Fall.

CME 605 Building Information Modeling for Construction Management (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introduction to the basic concepts of building information modeling as a construction approach, and exploration of its application to construction management. Emphasis on building information modeling for estimating, scheduling, clash detection, and project communication. An experiment‐based, analytical, or evaluative project is required. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing Co-requisite: CME 543 Note: Credit will not be given for both CME 405 and CME 605.

CME 610 Computer-Aided Design and Drafting (3)
One-half hour lecture, two-and-one-half hours lab, and a minimum of six hours additional lab is required. This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of computer-aided design and drafting. It covers the commands needed to create a two-dimensional drawing, with particular emphasis on techniques used in the design profession applications. The requirements for the course include completing self-tutorials, creating drawings, and the completion of two major projects at an advanced level. Spring.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 410 and CME 610.

CME 622 Composite Materials for Sustainable Construction (3)
Two hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Properties, manufacture and design of multiphase materials. Applications and testing for service in sustainable construction systems and life-cycle analysis. Evaluation of current practices and materials. Spring.
Prerequisite(s): CME 226, Statics and Mechanics of Materials, and CME 387 or CME 587, Renewable Materials for Sustainable Construction

CME 643 Estimating for Construction in a Green Global Economy (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Building upon the estimating skills developed through undergraduate coursework and professional experience this course will look at how to address global estimating concerns such as monetary value between various currencies, how the purchase of commodities futures effects material pricing, the linkages between financial, real estate development and policies and their effects on the construction markets. How to price multi-year projects addressing the previous issues and how to construct an estimate that will convey the information relative to green construction costs to the client in a proper manner will also be addressed. Fall or Spring.
Prerequisites: CME 543 or equivalent or 3 to 5 years of professional estimating experience and permission of instructor.

CME 653 Construction Planning and Scheduling (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. The use of Gantt, Activity on Node, Precedence Diagram, PERT and Linear schedules. Identification of activities and duration analyses of these activities. Update schedules, plan and assign resources, plan cost and schedule. Schedule development is performed both manually and with industry accepted software. A term paper describing how the relevant topics of the course fit a specific industry application and an additional project utilizing the software are required. Fall.
Prerequisites: Estimating experience and/or equivalent scheduling experience. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 653 and CME 453.

CME 654 Construction Project Management (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. How to define and properly identify company organizational structures. Project delivery systems, integration of estimating, bidding, scheduling and cost control into the management process. How safety, quality control, value engineering, procurement, labor relations and insurance and bonding requirements are integral parts of a construction project. A term paper describing how the relevant topics of the course fit a specific industry application is required. Spring.
Prerequisite(s):CME 543, CME 653, or equivalent experience and permission of the instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 654 and CME 454.

CME 658 Construction Contracts and Specifications (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. The types of construction contracts used in the construction industry from the Owner, Contractor, Subcontractor and Supplier viewpoints. Types of required insurance and the remedies available to contractors are presented. The process of bidding and negotiating from the legal perspective is covered along with contract administration. Specifications are introduced by type and the requirements of each type are discussed, based on current industry-accepted standards. A term paper describing how the relevant topics of the course fit a specific industry application is required. Spring.
Prerequisite: Upper division standing or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 658 and CME 455.

CME 663 Managing a Construction Project through Construction Planning and Scheduling (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Building upon planning and scheduling skills developed through undergraduate coursework and professional experience this course will examine the use of project schedules as the means to manage construction projects. The relationships between project progress, labor, materials, equipment and the project timeline will be explored. The use of the project schedule as a revenue projection, revenue measuring device will be discussed. How the schedule is used to deal with major project changes such as scope reductions, natural disaster impacts and major site accidents will also be covered. Earned value will be discussed and how the schedule can assist in its determination. Fall or Spring.
Prerequisites: CME 653 or equivalent or 3 to 5 years of professional estimating experience and permission of instructor.

CME 664 Urban Project Management (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Building upon project management skills developed through undergraduate coursework and professional experience this course will look at the unique challenges of construction projects in urban settings. Topics to be addressed include but are not limited to: site logistics and their importance to a successful project, the influence of permits and codes on the project, the growing use of technology to solve urban project problems, the issues related to labor, subcontractors and suppliers in this high intensity setting. The importance of communication and project documentation will be addressed as well. Fall or Spring.
Prerequisities: CME 654 or equivalent professional experience and permission of instructor.

CME 680 Fundamentals of Microscopy (3)
Three hours of lecture/demonstration per week. Introduction to light microscopy, electron microscopy, atomic force, confocal, Raman, Near Field Optical, Correlative and other microscopic methods and their newest applications. Light microscopic techniques include brightfield, phase contrast, polarized light, Nomarski, Kohler illumination. Imaging and recording methods. Fall.
Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 480 and CME 680.

CME 682 Transport Processes (2)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. The relationship between wood structure and wood permeability, moisture movement, and heat transfer. Fire retardant and wood-preservation treatments. Wood drying. Unsteady-state transport processes. An advanced laboratory problem with report in wood-moisture relationships, wood drying, the relationship between wood permeability and treatability, or wood preservative treatments. Spring.
Prerequisite: CME 387 or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 682 and CME 326.

CME 685 Transmission Electron Microscopy (5)
Two hours of lecture/two hours of laboratory/demonstration/minimum of four to ten hours of individual laboratory per week. The theory and operation of the transmission electron microscope including specimen preparation, photographic technique and interpretation of micrographs. 2 credit course Spring or Fall. Five-credit course offered in spring semester only.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CME 686 Wood-Water Relationships (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Relationship between wood moisture content and the environment, electrical and thermal properties, theories of moisture sorption, hygroscopic swelling and shrinking, thermodynamics of moisture sorption, mechanism of moisture movement as it relates to activation theory. Laboratory exercises will complement the theoretical topics discussed in the lecture. Fall.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CME 770 Biodegradation of Wood (3)
Two hours of lecture and 1 hour of laboratory/demonstration/discussion per week. Biology of lignicolous fungi and other microorganisms concerning their effects on wood properties. Anatomical, biological and chemical aspects of the major types of wood decay. Spring.
Prerequisite: Introductory biology and permission of instructor.

CME 785 Scanning Electron Microscopy (5)
Two hours of lecture/demonstration/laboratory per week. Ten hours of independent laboratory experience per week. Theory and operation of the scanning electron microscope, including specimen preparation, digital imaging, and interpretation of micrographs. Fall.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CME 797 Seminar (1 - 3)
Discussion of assigned topics in the fields related to Sustainable Construction Management and Wood Science. Spring and Fall.

CME 798 RESEARCH IN RESEARCH IN SUSTAINABLE CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT AND WOOD SCIENCE (1 - 12)
Independent research topics in Sustainable Construction Management and Wood Science. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

CME 898 Professional Experience/Synthesis (1 - 6)
A supervised, documented professional work experience in the Master of Professional Studies degree program. Fall, Spring, or Summer.
Pre- or co-requisite(s): Approval of proposed study plan by advisor, Faculty, and any sponsoring organization.

CME 899 Master's Thesis Research (1 - 12)
Research and independent study for the master's thesis. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.

CME 999 Doctoral Thesis Research (1 - 12)
Research and independent study for the doctoral dissertation. Fall, Spring or Summer.
Credit hours to be arranged.


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