SEARCH:

Environmental Studies


Spotlight 2003 Abstracts

Table of Contents

Click on links to see abstracts

ARE THERE ENVIRONMENTAL KUZNETS CURVE FOR CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS?
Jaewon Choi and Valerie A. Luzadis.

ESTIMATING THE TOTAL QUANTITY OF ENERGY CONSUMED BY THE CAROUSEL CENTER IN THE YEAR 2000
Shana Ederer, Peter King, Ryan Maher, Jeff Pacelli, Greg Rust, Adam Smith, Paul Thompson, Charles A.S. Hall, and Richard Smardon.

THE ENERGY COST OF PRODUCING AN ESF GRADUATE
Peter King, Ryan M. Maher, Charles A.S. Hall, and Richard Smardon

A SPATIAL MODEL OF LANDUSE CHANGE IN THE CATSKILL/DELAWARE WATERSHED USING GEOMOD
Susan K. Nixson, Myrna Hall, Mary Tyrrell, Neil Sampson

SPATIAL MODELLING OF EVAPOTRANSPIRATION IN THE LUQUILLO EXPERIMENTAL FOREST OF PUERTO RICO USING REMOTE SENSING DATA
Wei Wu, Charles A. S. Hall, Fred Scatena.

Abstracts

TOP
ARE THERE ENVIRONMENTAL KUZNETS CURVE FOR CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS?
Jaewon Choi ,Faculty of Environmental Studies, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY 13210.  Valerie A. Luzadis , Faculty of Forestry, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY 13210.

Some empirical researchers have claimed that an environmental Kuznets relationship exists for certain pollutants (the inverted-U hypothesis between per capita income level and atmospheric air pollution). Incautious policy inference can be derived from this claim. That is, economic growth itself can be regarded as a remedy to environmental problems. Previous EKC studies have relied on technological advancement, increasing demand for quality environment, and stricter regulations in developed countries for the theoretical explanation of the phenomenon. Based on the notion of physical limitations to material production process, I hypothesize that emission of carbon dioxide monotonically increases as income increases, as opposed to the inverted U-shape relationship between income and pollution. I use a panel dataset consisted of 85 countries from 5 continents from 1971 to 1996 period. The dataset includes variables such as per capita CO 2emissions, real GDP, energy consumption, and population growth data(from World Bank, International Energy Agency and US Department of Energy). The initial finding with the fixed effect estimator is that the relationship between CO 2emissions and economic growth is better captured by using the model which assumes inverted-U shaped relationship between the two variables. However, energy consumption is a more important factor than economic growth in explaining CO 2emissions. Policies intended for the green house gas emissions should focus on energy consumption, fuel mix, and economic growth altogether.

TOP
ESTIMATING THE TOTAL QUANTITY OF ENERGY CONSUMED BY THE CAROUSEL CENTER IN THE YEAR 2000
Shana Ederer , Peter King , Ryan Maher , Jeff Pacelli , Greg Rust , Adam Smith , Paul Thompson , Charles A.S. Hall ,and Richard Smardon ,Faculty of Environmental Studies EST 496 Energy Audit Course, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY 13210.

Question: How much energy does it take to build, operate and maintain a modern shopping mall?  This paper analyzes the amount of energy it takes to construct, operate, and maintain the Carousel Center Mall located in Syracuse, New York.  We include both onsite and offsite energy required to construct, operate and maintain the mall, including site remediation and preparation, transportation of shoppers, employees and goods.  Also included is the manufacture of materials, mall store turnover, maintenance and, waste removal.  We found that it took 12.473 terrajoules to operate the mall in the year 2000.  

TOP
THE ENERGY COST OF PRODUCING AN ESF GRADUATE
Peter King, Ryan M. Maher
Environmental Studies 496 Energy Analysis
Charles A.S. Hall
Faculty of Environmental and Forest Biology, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY 13210
Richard Smardon
Faculty of Environmental Studies, SUNY ESF .

We calculated the total quantity of energy required to produce an ESF graduate based on the energy costs associated with on and off campus activities in 2001. We identified and analyzed four components of the ESF energy budget: direct on-site energy; indirect energy in supplies, equipment, and new construction; energy in transportation of students, faculty, and staff, including daily commute and field trips/research; and maintenance metabolism, including energy use in food consumption, residence utilities, and student spending. We determined the energy cost per student in 2001 and multiplied this annual cost by the average time it takes to earn an ESF diploma to generate the energy cost per graduate. Direct energy on-site use was obtained through the ESF Physical Plant. Indirect energy, energy in transportation, and energy for maintenance metabolism was calculated using a campus wide survey and estimated energy intensities of specific goods and services. The average ESF graduate uses 1.15 TJ in pursuit of their degree. Energy analyses can be useful tools to understand total facility energy costs and can also serve in developing energy conservation initiatives.

TOP
A SPATIAL MODEL OF LANDUSE CHANGE IN THE CATSKILL/DELAWARE WATERSHED USING GEOMOD
Susan K. Nixson
M.P.S Candidate, Graduate Program Environmental Science, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry .
Myrna Hall
Faculty of Environmental Studies, SUNY-College of Environmental Science and Forestry .
Mary Tyrrell
3Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Global Institute of Sustainable Forestry, Program on Private Forests .
Neil Sampson
President, The Sampson Group, Research Scientist, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies .

Forests in the Northeastern United States are increasingly under threat from urban sprawl and other unplanned development. The challenge is increasingly one of keeping forests as forests—preventing their permanent loss to development or from being fragmented into such small parcels that sustainable management is no longer feasible. We focus our analysis on one of the last remaining “working” forest areas in the Northeast, the Catskill/Delaware water supply watersheds in New York.  In addition to threatening loss of livelihood from forestry, sprawl in this region threatens the sustainability of the largest unfiltered surface water supply in the country.  We employ a dynamic land use simulation model (GEOMOD), developed by Charles Hall and graduate students at SUNY ESF, to analyze the pattern of the underlying bio/demographic/physical/political factors causing  forest fragmentation and permanent loss of forestland..  With this model we use Landsat imagery from 1993 and 2001 to analyze the rate and spatial pattern of land conversion.  We then apply the observed rate of change to project which areas of the watersheds are most likely to become developed in the next 20 years.  The preliminary results of our analysis show that 192,264 acres of our study area are likely to convert from forest to non-forest by the year 2021.

TOP
SPATIAL MODELLING OF EVAPOTRANSPIRATION IN THE LUQUILLO EXPERIMENTAL FOREST OF PUERTO RICO USING REMOTE SENSING DATA
Wei Wu, Charles A. S. Hall
Faculty of Environmental Studies,  SUNY, College of Environmental Science and Forestry.
Fred Scatena
Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania.

Tropical forests play a key role in the global water balance and also in climatic change. For example tropical forests are responsible for a large part of the world’s actual evapotranspiration (aET), a major component of the hydrologic cycle. AET and related processes also can explain 70 percent of the lateral global energy transport though latent heat, and therefore are very important in the redistribution of water on the Earth’s surface. Any change of aET, either through a change in vegetation or a change in climate, would affect the runoff and the water resources available to humans.

We integrated one Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) imagy with a hydrological model (Granger, 1989) to estimate the spatial pattern of actual evapotranspiration (aET) in the month when the TM imagery was obtained (January 1985) over the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) in northeastern Puerto Rico. The derived aETs ranged from 0 to 6.86 mm/day correlated with elevations over the entire LEF. The simulated data were compared with field measurements of aET using the thermal dissipation probe method at different locations at different elevations and in different forest types. The comparisons showed good agreement at low and middle elevations but only moderate agreement at high elevations .We discussed the relations between aET and the vegetation types using categorical data analysis. The results show that both very high and very low aET occur in the low elevation forest, implying that this forest has both the highest mean aET and also the highest variation. The high elevation dwarf (or cloud) forest and the palm forest have low aET, and aET in the forest at intermediate elevation is a little higher than that in the


Social

YouTube Channels

ESF | Athletics | Research | Academics | Sustainability | New York | Nature


SUNY-ESF
State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry
SUNY-ESF |
1 Forestry Drive | Syracuse, NY 13210 | 315-470-6500
Copyright © 2016 | Admissions Information | Webmaster