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Graduate Opportunities
Water Programs at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Fish and Wildlife Biology Management

Participating Faculty

  • John M. Farrell; jmfarrell@esf.edu
    riverine fish ecology, freshwater coastal wetlands, great lakes, fisheries science & management, aquatic ecology, wetlands restoration, st. lawrence river studies, invasive species, zooplankton ecology
  • Jacqueline Frair; jfrair@esf.edu
    wildlife ecology and management, ecology of large herbivores and predators, animal movements, resource selection, population demography, quantitative methods in conservation, landscape ecology
  • James Gibbs; jpgibbs@esf.edu
    herpetology, vertebrate conservation biology, genetics and ecology in birds, reptiles and amphibians, songbirds, giant tortoise, statistics, wildlife population monitoring, galapagos islands, conservation biology, ecological monitoring, population genetics, applied demography, undergraduate conservation education
  • Karin E. Limburg; klimburg@esf.edu
    riverine fish and estuarine ecology, fisheries ecology, watershed ecology, systems ecology, ecological economics, fisheries and ecosystem science, coupled human-natural systems, biogeochemistry, fisheries ecology, ecosystem ecology, biogeochemical tracers, modeling
  • Mark V. Lomolino; island@esf.edu
    conservation biology, wildlife, ecology, evolution and biogeography
  • Stacy A. McNulty; smcnulty@esf.edu
    forest ecology, landscape ecology, long-term monitoring, and applied geographic information systems. focused on exploring long-term changes, biodiversity conservation in the northern forest, and impacts of recreation, development, and forest management in the adirondack mountains and northern forest, phenology, amphibians, beaver, songbirds, white-tailed deer, animal movements and habitat use, wildlife management
  • Neil H. Ringler; neilringler@esf.edu
    fish ecology and behavior, foraging behavior of fishes, salmon reproduction, vertebrate anatomy, aquatic insect ecology, stream ecology and management, aquatic and fisheries restoration, aquatic entomology
  • Kimberly L. Schulz; kschulz@syr.edu
    nutrient and exotic species effects on aquatic ecosystems, ecological stoichiometry, aquatic community and ecosystem ecology, bioenergetics, nutrient cycling, lower food web studies, great lakes, finger lakes, plankton, limnology, aquatic ecology, biogeochemistry, invasive species
  • Donald Stewart; djstewart@esf.edu
    ecology and systematics, lake systems ecology, aquatic ecology, fish conservation, ecology and population biology in tropical and temperate systems, fish ecology and fisheries management, ecological energetics, modeling predation and production processes, Great Lakes ecosystems, Amazonian ecosystems, ecology and systematics of neotropical freshwater fishes
  • H. Brian Underwood; hbunderw@syr.edu
    wildlife ecology, deer, small mammals, songbirds, quantitative ecology and biostatistics, population surveys, ecological modeling and simulation, national park management, applied population analysis, life-history evolution, trophic dynamics, large mammal management
  • Christopher Whipps; cwhipps@esf.edu
    fish parasites and diseases, wildlife diseases, parasitology, microbiology, taxonomy, molecular systematics, diagnostics, parasites as biological tags and ecological indicators, epidemiology and control of pathogens of ecological and veterinary importance, evolution and biology of disease causing organisms in animal populations using molecular systematics

Major:  Environmental and Forest Biology

Option: Fish and Wildlife Management

Degree: M.S., M.P.S., or Ph.D.

Study in this area provides students with advanced preparation in biological concepts of fish and wildlife populations as they relate to resource management. Increasing concern for these wild animal resources has been matched by strong student interest in educational programs that prepare them for careers in the fish and wildlife professions; ESF graduates are employed worldwide.

Graduate education is rapidly becoming a universal prerequisite to employment as a professional fisheries or wildlife biologist. A major strength is the diversity of cooperators including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Geological Survey and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Areas of research include population habitat relationships, predator ecology, fish behavior, wildlife in Adirondack ecosystems, urban wildlife relationships, endangered species studies, feeding ecology of fishes, stream ecology, Great Lakes fisheries, ecology of larval fishes and estuarine properties of Great Lakes wetlands.

ESF is a specialized unit within the SUNY system focused to natural resources and the environment. Perhaps nowhere in the world is there a larger grouping of ecologists dedicated to solving environmental problems through research, teaching and service. With a total enrollment of about 1,000 undergraduates and 600 graduate students, ESF's size creates an intimate College community. The low student/faculty ratio also allows for an active advisory system that provides personal attention and assistance for students. The proximity of the adjacent Syracuse University gives students the added resources of a large, comprehensive institution of higher education, including an array of courses, computer and library facilities, and sports and health services.

ESF's field stations are unmatched, and include the 6,000-hectare Huntington Forest and associated Adirondack Ecological Center, the Cranberry Lake Biological Station in the Adirondack Mountains and the Heiberg Forest south of Syracuse. Other field facilities are available on the St. Lawrence River, including the Thousand Islands Biological Station. These properties form a strong foundation for much of the coursework taken by undergraduate students and field research for graduate students. Undergraduates in Fish and Wildlife Science spend a summer taking classes at Cranberry Lake. Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to intern as field assistants with graduate students to gain direct experience with wildlife research.

Fish and wildlife programs at ESF date back to early studies of Adirondack fishes and work in the Yellowstone National Park. These efforts quickly expanded to include formation of the Roosevelt Wild Life Station in 1919. The Roosevelt Wildlife Museum also was established, and currently houses over 20,000 specimens of vertebrates that are an integral part of today's teaching and research programs. Today, the faculty in fish and wildlife supervise more than $3 million in sponsored research and about 60 graduate students. While much of the research occurs in New York State, international opportunities are available and recent studies have been conducted in Canada, Mexico, Argentina and Madagascar. Studies range from restoration of species, to adaptive management of wildlife in forest ecosystems and urban areas. Technology is often central to this research including extensive use of computer modeling, use of satellite imagery to evaluate habitat, and radio and GPS telemetry to study animal behavior and population dynamics.

Water Resources Engineering

Participating Faculty

  • Douglas J. Daley; djdaley@esf.edu
    water resources, solid and hazardous waste management, ecological engineering, environmental restoration, phytoremediation, bioremediation, soil and water pollution, solid and hazardous waste management, environmental engineering
  • Theodore A. Endreny; te@esf.edu
    water resources engineering, ecological engineering, stream restoration, urban watersheds, lesser-developed countries
  • Charles N. Kroll; cnkroll@syr.edu
    stochastic and deterministic hydrology, environmental modeling, water resource systems engineering, ecological engineering, urban forestry, drought assessment, environmental systems engineering, stochastic and deterministic modeling, risk assessment, coupled human and natural systems
  • Stephen B. Shaw; sbshaw@esf.edu
    hydroclimatology, water resources engineering, ecohydrology in a changing climate, water resources, climate change, hydrology, systems modeling, stormwater management

Major:  Environmental and Resource Engineering

Option: Water Resources Engineering

Degree: M.S. or Ph.D.

Water Resources Engineering deals with analysis and design of water resource systems through field, laboratory, and computer methods. Emphasis is placed on coordinating engineering to reduce impacts on human and natural systems. Students select among alternative solutions to water resource problems, in recognition of environmental, economic, legal, social and managerial constraints. Laboratory equipment includes soil columns, a river table and two tilting and sediment circulating flumes, all supported by monitoring sensors. Analytical techniques using statistics, numerical analyses, and computer applications are emphasized. Modeling efforts include computational fluid dynamics, GIS, and remote sensing applications, distributed and real-time models, and model calibration and validation.


Water and Wetland Resource Studies

Participating Faculty

  • Gregory L. Boyer; glboyer@esf.edu
    BIOCHEMISTRY and ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY, plant and algal biochemistry, chemical ecology and toxins produced by algae. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING, including Buoy and ship-based monitoring systems for water quality
  • Russell D. Briggs; rdbriggs@esf.edu
    forest ecology, watershed ecology, soils, ecosystem services, watershed management, forest soils, silviculture
  • Douglas J. Daley; djdaley@esf.edu
    water resources, solid and hazardous waste management, ecological engineering, environmental restoration, phytoremediation, bioremediation, soil and water pollution, solid and hazardous waste management, environmental engineering
  • Klaus Dölle; kdoelle@esf.edu
    pulp & paper and related environmental topics, design, constructed wetlands,subsurface bioreactors, fossil energy, bioenergy, hydropower, water and waste water treatment, paper recycling, paper development, filler materials, energy savings, renewable energy & processes, engineering, machine & process design.
  • Theodore A. Endreny; te@esf.edu
    water resources engineering, ecological engineering, stream restoration, urban watersheds, lesser-developed countries
  • Rafaat M. Hussein; rmhussei@esf.edu
    environmental sustainability; sustainable construction; architectural engineering.
  • Charles N. Kroll; cnkroll@syr.edu
    stochastic and deterministic hydrology, environmental modeling, water resource systems engineering, ecological engineering, urban forestry, drought assessment, environmental systems engineering, stochastic and deterministic modeling, risk assessment, coupled human and natural systems
  • Karin E. Limburg; klimburg@esf.edu
    riverine fish and estuarine ecology, fisheries ecology, watershed ecology, systems ecology, ecological economics, fisheries and ecosystem science, coupled human-natural systems, biogeochemistry, fisheries ecology, ecosystem ecology, biogeochemical tracers, modeling
  • Sharon D. Moran; smoran@esf.edu
    environmental policy, human dimensions of water/wastewater issues, political ecology, environment-society relations, green and innovative technologies, environmental issues in post-communist countries, qualitative research methods, gender and nature, sustainability indicators, emergent technologies, environmental justice, ethical frameworks in public policy
  • Neil H. Ringler; neilringler@esf.edu
    fish ecology and behavior, foraging behavior of fishes, salmon reproduction, vertebrate anatomy, aquatic insect ecology, stream ecology and management, aquatic and fisheries restoration, aquatic entomology
  • Kimberly L. Schulz; kschulz@syr.edu
    nutrient and exotic species effects on aquatic ecosystems, ecological stoichiometry, aquatic community and ecosystem ecology, bioenergetics, nutrient cycling, lower food web studies, great lakes, finger lakes, plankton, limnology, aquatic ecology, biogeochemistry, invasive species
  • Theresa Selfa; tselfa@esf.edu
    environmental sociology, rural sociology, sociology of agriculture, sociology of development, political sociology, qualitative methods, comparative-historical methods, biofuels, land use planning, water policy and politics
  • Stephen B. Shaw; sbshaw@esf.edu
    hydroclimatology, water resources engineering, ecohydrology in a changing climate, water resources, climate change, hydrology, systems modeling, stormwater management
  • Richard C. Smardon; rsmardon@esf.edu
    wetland assessment and management, landscape management policy, public participation and decision-making, sustainable development, eco-tourism, biosphere reserve management
  • John C. Stella; stella@esf.edu
    riparian and stream ecology, restoration ecology, watershed management, ecological modeling, tree-ring science, river restoration
  • Wendong Tao; wtao@esf.edu
    Sustainable wastewater treatment (Constructed wetland, gravel biofilter, simultaneous nitritation and anammox); Resource recovery from bioresidues (anaerobic digestion, solid-liquid separation, struvite recovery, ammonia recovery)
  • Philippe G. Vidon; pgvidon@esf.edu
    Stream Restoration, Ecological Engineering, Riparian Zone and Watershed Management, Water Quality, Riparian Zone/Watershed Biogeochemistry and Hydrology, Best Management Practices, Surface and Subsurface Hydrology, Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Mercury, Carbon Cycling, Greenhouse Gases (N2O, CO2, CH4).

Major:  Division of Environmental Science

Option: Watershed Science

Degree: B.S.

Option: Water and Wetland Resources Studies

Degree: M.S., M.P.S., or Ph.D.        

The water and wetland resources area of study develops an understanding of technical, social and institutional aspects of water resources management, mitigation and restoration. Individual students may emphasize scientific or social subject areas but all study in both areas. Scientific aspects include the basic physical, chemical and biological interactions occurring in water resources systems. The social aspects are concerned with planning, regulation, law and institutions and management of water and wetland resources. Water serves as a focus for graduate study in water and related land resources management and water pollution and water quality control.

Recommended coursework includes:

  • physical sciences: civil engineering, geology, geomorphology, hydrology, meteorology, environmental engineering, soils, water chemistry, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry and geographic information systems;
  • biological sciences: ecology, entomology, fisheries biology, forestry, microbiology, water quality and limnology; and
  • social sciences: administration, economics, government, history, law, ethics, philosophy and policy.

SUNY-ESF
State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry
SUNY-ESF |
1 Forestry Drive | Syracuse, NY 13210 | 315-470-6500
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