e s f home link - e s f college of environmental science and forestry
e s f home link - e s f college of environmental science and forestry

Entomology Area of Study for M.S., M.P.S. or Ph.D. in Environmental and Forest Biology

  • butterfly
  • gathering samples from a tree
  • gathering samples from a tree
  • a insect
  • gathering samples
  • preparing petri dishes
  • gathering samples
  • Two bugs
  • gathering soil samples
  • adjusting a structure
  • studying data in the lab
  • a tree
  • gathering samples
Apply

Graduate study opportunities prepare students in the basic aspects of insect life and the role of insects in relation to humans and their environment.

The wide range of effects stemming from insect activity, from the beneficial to the deleterious, allows for a variety of research subjects in which insects play a major role. Thesis topics may concern insects that affect forests, shade trees and wood products, those relating to the health and well-being of humans, those playing key roles as parasites and predators of pest species, and those serving as food for many birds and vertebrate animals. Current research areas include population dynamics of forest defoliators, pheromone communications in beetles and moths, evolution of chemical communication, effects of forest practices on stream benthic insects, natural control of insects in forest systems and biochemistry of insect detoxification mechanisms.

Participating Faculty

  • Lawrence P. Abrahamson; labrahamson@esf.edu
    entomology, pathology, pesticides, vegetation management, forest insects
  • Melissa K. Fierke; mkfierke@esf.edu
    forest entomology, forest ecology, invasive forest pests, insect-tree interactions, tree defenses
  • Brian F. Leydet; bfleydet@esf.edu
    infectious and vector-borne diseases, arthropods of veterinary and medical importance, vector biology, vector-pathogen-host interactions, disease ecology, molecular biology, epidemiology of Lyme and other tick-borne diseases
  • Dylan Parry; dparry@esf.edu
    Biological invasion, climate change, and conservation, primarily in the context of insects in forested ecosystems.
  • Neil H. Ringler; nhringle@esf.edu
    fish ecology and behavior, foraging behavior of fishes, salmon reproduction, vertebrate anatomy, aquatic insect ecology, stream ecology and management, aquatic and fisheries restoration, aquatic entomology
  • Stephen A. Teale; sateale@esf.edu
    forest entomology, insect behavior, pheromones of forest insects, insect ecology, pest management, chemical ecology, evolution of pheromone communications

Current Graduate Students in Entomology


Current Students Only currently registered students appear — new names appear at start of academic year

Student information is forthcoming.