Fall Semester ESF Courses

Office Hours: T, W 10:30-11:30 am Please email to schedule visit

River Form and Process

River Classification
  • Course ID:
    ERE 412 / ERE 612
  • Online Resources:
    Blackboard | Photos from Previous Years
  • General Description:
    River Form & Process covers theories of river classification, presented and tested using field gathered data. Classified river form and suggested evolution sequences are used to discuss governing fluvial processes. Computational river hydraulics is used to estimate sediment transport, and a design sequence is employed to consider issues of channel stability and restoration.

Introduction to Environmental Resources Engineering

  • Course ID:
    ERE 132
  • Online Resources:
    Blackboard | Prior Year Photos
  • General Description:
    Students in ERE 132 completing this course will be able to: a) define engineering and explain 1 important innovation from each of its 5 fundamental ages; b) identify the teaching and research specializations of ERE faculty; c) create a professional resume to help you achieve academic and career success; and e) gain exposure to select environmental engineering facilities and understand the role they play in serving the local community as well as the expertise required to design, construct, operate and maintain.

Spring Semester

Office Hours: T 10:30-11:30 am Baker 402, W 3:30-4:30 pm Baker 105 Please email to confirm the time is not taken.

Ecological Engineering in the Tropics

Ecological Engineering in the Tropics
  • Course ID:
    ERE 311 / ERE 511
  • Meeting Location & Time:
    Field site Costa Rica, Planned for ESF spring break
  • Online Resources:
    Blackboard | Syllabus | Costa Rica 2017 | Costa Rica 2015 | Honduras 2007 | Honduras 2008 | Honduras 2009 | Daily Orange covers 2013 Costa Rica Trip |
  • General Description:
    Ecological Engineering in the Tropics covers principles of ecological engineering for ecosystem restoration and pollution control. Field trips to pristine and degraded ecosystems including: humid tropical cloud forests, coastal mangrove, dry mountain forests, and coral reefs to identify target functions for nature and society, observe degradations, and develop sustainable restoration designs. The course will: a) provide applied learning that helps students recommit to their degree program, b) provide interdisciplinary enrichment between engineering and environmental sciences, and c) provide learning in the tropical region experiencing pressures from population growth, climate disruption, and land use change. This course won a 2004 SUNY International Program award.

Seminar: Hydrology and Biogeochemistry:

  • Course ID:
    ERE 797
  • General Description:
    This course is inter-disciplinary and brings together our environmental biology, forestry, chemistry, and engineering units, as well as collaborative partners from Syracuse University. We mix presentations on recent research findings with food and drinks, and have enjoyed a favorable response by students and faculty. Topics that capture student interest include photo essays of nearby research sites, introducing graduates to advisors, field methods and equipment available for their work, and trading lessons learned with other grads.

Engineering Hydrology and Hydraulics

Engineering Hydrology and Hydraulics
  • Course ID:
    ERE 340 / ERE 540
  • Online Resources:
    Blackboard | Water Resources Engineering blogs by students in 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013
  • General Description:
    Engineering Hydrology & Hydraulics covers watershed hydrology and analysis of rainfall, evapotranspiration, infiltration, and runoff processes as well as hydraulic processes involved with pipe networks, open-channels with flow controls, and groundwater systems. Students will work with the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy to analyze water resources systems and control volumes, in order to determine the spatial and temporal components needed in a design project. Design projects involve water delivery, flood control, and ecoystem restoration, all of which can be practiced in urban or rural areas, in high to low income countries, at local to national scales, and for private, governmental, or non-governmental organizations.

Humanitarian Engineering for Development Workers | Appropriate Technologies for Developing Countries

  • Course ID:
    ERE 496 / ERE 596
  • Online Resources:
    Blackboard | NAE Global Scholars Challenge Program | Engineers without Borders
  • General Description:
    The course focuses on the why and how of delivering basic services to rural populations, where services include potable water, waste removal and sanitation, smoke venting and efficient cook stoves, and electricity to provide light for reading. Engineering infrastructure used to deliver these services in developed countries is often found as inappropriate in the rural sectors of developing countries due to the associated design, build, and maintenance costs that prohibit local acquisition and control. Appropriate technologies are designed and built for local cultural, economic, and environmental conditions and can be maintained locally.