Office Hours:

Open Door Policy - if I am with someone, let me know you are waiting; you can email to schedule an appointment.

Fall Semester ESF Courses

River Form and Process

River Classification
  • Course ID:
    ERE 412 / ERE 612
  • Online Resources:
    Blackboard | Photos from Previous Years
  • General Description:
    River Form & Process covers theories of river classification, presented and tested using field gathered data. Classified river form and suggested evolution sequences are used to discuss governing fluvial processes. Computational river hydraulics is used to estimate sediment transport, and a design sequence is employed to consider issues of channel stability and restoration.

Spring Semester

Seminar: Hydrology and Biogeochemistry:

  • Course ID:
    ERE 797
  • General Description:
    This course is inter-disciplinary and brings together our environmental biology, forestry, chemistry, and engineering units, as well as collaborative partners from Syracuse University. We mix presentations on recent research findings with food and drinks, and have enjoyed a favorable response by students and faculty. Topics that capture student interest include photo essays of nearby research sites, introducing graduates to advisors, field methods and equipment available for their work, and trading lessons learned with other grads.

Engineering Hydrology and Hydraulics

Engineering Hydrology and Hydraulics
  • Course ID:
    ERE 340 / ERE 540
  • Online Resources:
    Blackboard | Water Resources Engineering blogs by students in 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013
  • General Description:
    Engineering Hydrology & Hydraulics covers watershed hydrology and analysis of rainfall, evapotranspiration, infiltration, and runoff processes as well as hydraulic processes involved with pipe networks, open-channels with flow controls, and groundwater systems. Students will work with the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy to analyze water resources systems and control volumes, in order to determine the spatial and temporal components needed in a design project. Design projects involve water delivery, flood control, and ecoystem restoration, all of which can be practiced in urban or rural areas, in high to low income countries, at local to national scales, and for private, governmental, or non-governmental organizations.