2020 GLRC Grant Awards Projects/Photos

SUNY Brockport: Andie Graham, Bergen Swamp Project

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Professional Wetland Scientist Andie Graham with SUNY Brockport, Brockport, N.Y., has received a Great Lakes Research Consortium grant to examine the impact of two non-native invasive insect species on the water quality and hydrology of Bergen Swamp as part of the Lake Ontario watershed. Photo: Megan Aubertine

SUNY Brockport: Jacob Straub, Great Lakes Diving and Sea Duck Population Project

Download: Jacob Straub, Ph.D.

Jacob Straub, Ph.D., of SUNY Brockport, Brockport, N.Y., releases a banded diving duck in the Lower Great Lakes Region as part of a Great Lakes Research Consortium-funded project to better understand the role of thiamine levels in the population dynamics of diving and sea ducks on the Great Lakes. Photo: Abigail Weigel

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Download: Danilo Fernando, Ph.D.

Danilo Fernando, Ph.D., SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, N.Y., has received a Great Lakes Research Consortium grant to apply a genetics-based approach to identifying and propagating native species of American beachgrass (at right) critical to ecosystem sustainability along Lake Ontario. Photo left: ESF; beachgrass: Stephen M. Young/NYNHP

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Download: Erica L. Majumder, Ph.D.

Erica L. Majumder, Ph.D., SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, N.Y., has received a Great Lakes Research Consortium grant to evaluate how microplastics may influence Harmful Algal Bloom formation. At left, she culture microbes in an anaerobic chamber. Photo left: Caroline Gjerstad; photo right: Scripps Research Career Services

University at Buffalo

Download: Ian BradleyIan Bradley, Ph.D., and Zhenduo Zhu Ph.D.

Ian Bradley, Ph.D., and Zhenduo Zhu, Ph.D, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, N.Y., have received a Great Lakes Research Consortium grant to advance the modeling and prediction of Harmful Algal Blooms by shifting focus to the role of nitrogen and nitrogen-phosphorus dynamics in algal bloom composition and toxicity and through the use of high throughput DNA sequencing. Photo: University at Buffalo

2019 GLRC Grant Awards Projects/Photos

Stony Brook Project 1 of 2

Download: Dr. Ali Farhadzadeh
Dr. Ali Farhadzadeh leads the Great Lakes Research Consortium-funded project that is developing a basis for computer modeling to address Eastern Lake Erie erosion, sediment transport and depositions under a changing climate. Photo: University at Stony Brook

Stony Brook Project 2 of 2

Download: Sherif L. Abdelaziz, Ph.D. & Drew Strakey
Caption: Sherif L. Abdelaziz, Ph.D., right, a professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, N.Y., and Drew Strakey, a Wayne County Soil and Water Conservation District Technician and Program Specialist, Lyons, NY, are scouting potential locations for research that will test an innovation approach to managing shoreline erosion. With a $25,000 grant award by the Great Lakes Research Consortium (GLRC) in partnership with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation earlier this year, Abdelaziz will evaluate the use of marine-based, ecosystem-friendly biopolymers as a potential technique for increasing shoreline erosion resistance and protection. The work includes both laboratory experiments and field testing over multiple seasons with a site yet to be named in Wayne County. Photo: Wayne County SWCD

ESF Project

Download: Iman Pakzad
ESF graduate student Iman Pakzad is assisting ESF Professor Roxanne Razavi, Ph.D., with the Great Lakes Research Consortium-funded project investigating the potential for tubenose goby to act as a vector of mercury in the aquatic ecosystem. Photo: Jonathan White

Brockport Project

Download: Rachel Schultz, Ph.D. & Courtney Scoles
With a grant from the Great Lakes Research Consortium, Rachel Schultz, Ph.D., right, of The College at Brockport, and graduate student Courtney Scoles are assessing the effects of cattail treatment on methane emissions from Lake Ontario coastal wetlands. Photo: Jake Straub