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Catalog Information Subject to Change

The current ESF Catalog is online only, and is updated as needed throughout the year. To view the version officially associated with a particular year of entry to the College, please refer to the appropriate catalog of record.

ESF Course Descriptions

ESF 109 Honors Seminar in Environmental Science and Forestry (1)
One hour of lecture/discussion per week. Sequential presentations by ESF faculty and staff members. Exploration of science, engineering, design, management and social science applied to regional, national and global issues. A written report and presentation is required. Fall.
Prerequisite: Admission to the lower division Honors Program.

ESF 122 The Ecology of the Economic Process (3)
An approach to economics as a natural, rather than a social science. Examination of the ecology of human-dominated ecosystems including cities, agricultural areas, and fisheries. Review of basic ideas of value, classical, neoclassical, and biophysical economics. Examines an alternative model emphasizing analysis of energy and material flows and their control. Case studies will focus on the developing economies of the tropics. Pre-Req: Enrollment in ESF in the High School.
Prerequisite(s): High School Living Environment (Biology) Co-requisite(s): High School Economics

ESF 200 Information Literacy (1)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week for five weeks. Introductory course for students of all levels and all curricula to the basic research process for information retrieval and management. Emphasis on electronic bibliographic and Internet research tools. Fall and Spring.

ESF 209 Honors Seminar in Environmental Science and Forestry (1)
One hour of presentation and discussion per week. Sequential presentations by students, or faculty, or both. Exploration of science, engineering, design, management and/or social science applied to regional, national and global environmental issues. A presentation and/or a written report may be required. Fall.
Prerequisite: Admission to the lower division Honors Program.

ESF 300 Introduction to Geospatial Information Technologies (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. A theoretical and practical course providing an introduction to the uses and limitations of geospatial information technologies, including geographic information systems (GIS), global positioning systems (GPS) and remote sensing, for environmental science and natural resources management applications. Fall and Spring.

ESF 499 Honors Thesis/Project (1 - 5)
Guided independent study in a topic related to the student's undergraduate major, resulting in a thesis/project. Students will give an honors presentation of their work. Fall and Spring.

ESF 503 Seminar on University Outreach and Public Service (1 - 3)
One- to three-credit seminar examines processes and strategies designed to enhance the scholarship and practice of university-based outreach and public service with an emphasis on relationships with K-12 schools and community organizations. Spring.

ESF 797 Graduate Seminar on Information Resources (1)
One hour of lecture/discussion per week. Searching for and evaluating information resources. Using citation management software. Preparing to write the research proposal and write and defend subsequent thesis/dissertation. Student presentations on information tools, thesis/dissertation research topics, formation of problem statement. Spring.

Course Numbering System

100-499: Undergraduate courses for which no graduate credit may be given.

500-599: Graduate courses designed expressly for areas of specialization in post-baccalaureate programs. Qualified undergraduate students may enroll by permission of the instructor.

600-699: Graduate courses designed expressly for advanced levels of specialization. Undergraduate students with a cumulative grade point average of 3.000 or better may enroll in these courses with an approved petition.

700-999: Advanced graduate level courses for which no undergraduate students may register. Shared resources courses, designated as 400/500 or 400/600, are designed when the topic coverage of both courses is the same. Separate course syllabuses are developed expressly differentiating the requirements and evaluative criteria between the undergraduate course and the graduate course. No type of cross-listing may be offered unless approved by the ESF faculty.