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Timothy Volk

Timothy A. Volk
Senior Research Associate

346 Illick Hall
1 Forestry Dr.
Syracuse, New York 13210

Phone: (315) 470-6774

Email: tavolk@esf.edu

Highest Education

Ph.D., State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (Short-Rotation Forestry), 2002

Areas of Study

Management and sustainability of short-rotation forestry (www.esf.edu/willow), agroforestry, phytoremediation, international forestry.

Courses Taught

  • Energy Systems (ESC 325/525, Fall)
  • Biomass and Bioenergy (ESC 441/641, Spring)
  • Renewable Energy Capstone Planning (ESC 450, Fall)

Recent Publications

  1. R. D. Hangs, J. J. Schoenau, K. C. J. Van Rees & T.A. Volk. 2014. Leaf litter decomposition and nutrient-release characteristics of several willow varieties within short-rotation coppice plantations in Saskatchewan, Canada. Bioenergy Research. DOI 10.1007/s12155-014-9431-y
  2. Amichev, B.Y., R.D. Hangs, S.M. Konecsni, C.N. Stadnyk, T.A. Volk, N. Bélanger, V.Vujanovic, J.J. Schoenau, J. Moukoumi, and K.C.J. Van Rees. In press. Willow production systems for bioenergy feedstock and C sequestration in Canada and Northern U.S.A.: A Review. SSSAJ.
  3. Pacaldo, R.S., T. A. Volk and R. Briggs. 2014. Carbon sequestration in fine roots and foliage biomass offsets soil CO2 effluxes along a 19-year chronosequence of shrub willow (Salix x dasyclados) biomass crops. Bioenergy Research. DOI 10.1007/s12155-014-9416-x
  4. Caputo, J., S. Balogh, T.A. Volk, L. Johnson, M. Puettman, B.R. Lippke, E. Oneil. 2014. Incorporating uncertainty analysis into life-cycle analysis (LCA) of short-rotation willow biomass (Salix spp.) crops. Bioenergy Research. 7:48-59.
  5. Quaye, A. and T.A. Volk. 2013. Biomass production and soil nutrients in organic and inorganic fertilized willow biomass production systems. Biomass and Bioenergy 57:113-125.
  6. Adiele, J. and T.A. Volk. 2013. Developing live cover crop systems for willow (Salix spp.) bioenergy crop. Sky Journal of Soil Science and Environmental Management 2(9):88-97.
  7. Tumwebaze, S. B., E. Bevilacqua, R. Briggs, and T. Volk. 2013. Allometric biomass equations for tree species used in agroforestry systems in Uganda. Agroforestry Systems 87:781-795.
  8. Quaye, A. and T.A. Volk. 2013. Biomass production and soil nutrients in organic and inorganic fertilized willow biomass production systems. Biomass and Bioenergy 57:113-125.
  9. Pacaldo, R.S., T.A. Volk and R. Briggs. 2013 No significant differences in soil organic carbon contents along a chronosequence of shrub willow biomass crop fields. Biomass and Bioenergy 58: 136-142.
  10. Serapiglia, M.J., K. Cameron, A.J. Stipanovic, L.P. Abrahamson, T.A. Volk and L.B. Smart. 2013. Yield and Woody Biomass Traits of Novel Shrub Willow Hybrids at Two Contrasting Sites. Bioenergy Research 6:533-546.
  11. Pacaldo, R.S., T. A. Volk and R. Briggs. 2013. Greenhouse gas potential of shrub willow biomass 1 crops based on below- and aboveground biomass inventory along a 19-year chronosequence. Bioenergy Research 6:252-262.
  12. Buchholz, T. and T.A. Volk. 2013. Profitability and deployment of willow biomass crops affected by different incentive programs. Bioenergy Research 6:53-64.
  13. Lippke, B., R. Gustafson, R. Venditti, P. Steele, T. Volk, E. Oneil, L. Johnson, M. Puettmann, K. Skog, 2012. Comparing wood product and cellulosic fuel carbon stores and fossil displacement impacts from managed forestland: Sustainable carbon mitigation while contributing to energy independence. Forest Products Journal 62(4): 247-257.
  14. Budsberg, E., M. Rastogi, M. Puettmann, J. Caputo, S. Balogh, T. Volk, R. Gustafson. 2012. Life cycle assessment for the production of bioethanol from willow biomass crops via biochemical conversion. Forest Products Journal 62(4): 305-313.
  15. Lippke, B, M. Puettmann, L. Johnson, R. Gustafson, R. Venditti, P. Steele, J. Katers, A. Taylor T. Volk, E. Oneil, K. Skog, E. Budsberg, J. Daystar, J. Caputo 2012. Carbon emission reduction impacts from biofuels as a percent of fossil fuel emissions and per unit of carbon in the wood used. Forest Products Journal 62(4): 296-304. 
  16. Campbell, S.P., J.L. Frair, J.P. Gibbs, and T.A. Volk. 2012. Use of short-rotation coppice willow plantations by birds and small mammals in central New York. Biomass and Bioenergy 47:342-353.
  17. Tumwebaze, S. B., E. Bevilacqua, R. Briggs, and T. Volk. 2012. Soil organic carbon under linear simultaneous agroforestry systems. Agroforestry Systems 84:11-23.
  18. Mirck, J. and T.A. Volk. 2012. Mass balances and allocation of salt ions from Solvay storm water for shrub willow (Salix spp.). Biomass and Bioenergy 39:427-438.
  19. Buchholz, T. and T.A. Volk. 2012. Considerations of Project Scale and Sustainability of Modern Bioenergy Systems in Uganda. Journal of Sustainable Forestry 31:154-173.
  20. Schifman, L.A., Stella, J.C. Volk, T.A. and Teece, M.A.2012. Carbon isotopic variation in shrub willow (Salix spp.) ring-wood as an indicator of long-term water status, growth and survival. Biomass and Bioenergy 36:316-326.

Current Graduate Advisees

Jesse CaputoJesse Caputo
jcaputo@syr.edu

  • Degree Sought: PHD
  • Graduate Advisor(s): Beier and Volk
  • Area of Study: Ecology and Ecosystems
  • Undergraduate Institute: University of Connecticut
  • Previous Graduate Study: University of Mass Amherst*

Personal Statement
Throughout history, forest ecosystems have provided human communities with a multitude of products, services, and values, including energy sources, structural materials, food, clean water, and important spiritual, cultural, and aesthetic values. My broad interests lie in understanding how the conservation and management of forestlands can continue to provide a diverse suite of goods and services, including both commodities and ecosystem services, as both the physical environment and human needs change and evolve over time.

Graduate Research Topic
The impacts of management practices, particularly those intended to produce biomass for energy production, on the provision of a broad suite of ecosystem services and forest commodities over time and space.


Danielle KlosterDanielle Kloster
dpkloste@syr.edu

  • Degree Sought: MS
  • Graduate Advisor(s): Volk
  • Area of Study: Coupled Natural and Human Systems
  • Undergraduate Institute: SUNY-ESF (Environmental Science)

Graduate Research Topic
Funding from the USDA through the BCAP (Biomass Crop Assistance Program) has encouraged farmers in upstate New York to plant some of their land in shrub willow for bioenergy applications. The USDA requires soil erosion modeling with the RUSLE2 for all land enrolled in the program, but the vegetation file currently in the database for shrub willow is incomplete and based on limited data. My project is focused on developing a more comprehensive vegetation file for the USDA RUSLE2 database, to be used for future modeling by the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) and other organizations. This vegetation file will be based on data collected from 5 sites throughout New York and Vermont, 6 age classes (including the crucial establishment year), and 3 clones of willow, each representing a different growth pattern and canopy shape.

Favorite Quote
"If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants." - Isaac Newton


Aayushi PatelAayushi Patel
arpate02@syr.edu

  • Degree Sought: MS
  • Graduate Advisor(s): Smardon and Volk
  • Area of Study: Coupled Natural and Human Systems

Graduate Research Topic
Use of Life Cycle Analysis to compare and contrast traditional landfill covers vs. vegetative covers

Favorite Quote
"Trees are Earth's constant effort to talk to the heavens above"


Nathan SleightNathan Sleight
njsleigh@syr.edu

  • Degree Sought: MS
  • Graduate Advisor(s): Volk
  • Area of Study: Coupled Natural and Human Systems
  • Undergraduate Institute: SUNY-ESF (Environmental Science)

Personal Statement
My academic interests are in the field of environmentally sustainable production and use of energy resources. Humanity has the job to be good stewards of the marvelous planet we have been given. Ensuring the health of both the human and natural environments will lead to the benefit and continuation of both.

Favorite Quote
"And ye shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free" - Jesus



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