WiSE Professions Talks

Women in Scientific and Environmental Professions & Other Lectures of Note


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Earth Lecture Series

Robin Wall Kimmerer

Distinguished Teaching Professor,  Environmental and Forest Biology, and Director, Center for Native Peoples and the Environment, SUNY-ESF

Earth:  Making a Home on Turtle Island

September 3, 12:45 pm, Gateway Center A& B

Sponsored by ESF's First-Year Experience

 

Dr. Kimmer’s is the author of numerous scientific papers on plant ecology, bryophyte ecology,http://www.humansandnature.org/filebin/images/scholar/earth/Kimmerer_Bio.jpg traditional knowledge and restoration ecology.  Her interests include the role of traditional ecological knowledge in ecological restoration and building resilience for climate change. In collaboration with tribal partners, she and her students have an active research program in the ecology and restoration of plants of cultural significance to Native people. She is active in efforts to broaden access to environmental science training for Native students, and to introduce the benefits of traditional ecological knowledge to the scientific community, in a way that respects and protects indigenous knowledge. Dr. Kimmerer is an enrolled member of the Citizen Band Potawatomi.  Her writings include “Gathering Moss” which incorporates both traditional indigenous knowledge and scientific perspectives and was awarded the prestigious John Burroughs Medal for Nature Writing in 2005, the newly released “Braiding Sweetgrass.”  She has served as writer in residence at Andrews Experimental Forest, Blue Mountain Center, the Sitka Center and others.   Her literary essays appear in Whole Terrain, Adirondack Life, Orion and several anthologies. Kimmerer holds a MS and PhD in Botany from the University of Wisconsin; she is also an ESF alumna (Botany, 1975).  Kimmerer is the co-founder and past president of the Traditional Ecological Knowledge section of the Ecological Society of America.

 

Department of Chemistry Seminar
Katrina Cornish
Endowed Chair and Ohio Research Scholar, Bioemergent Materials

Department of Horticulture and Crop Science & Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering
College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), Ohio State Univ. Horticulture

The Long Road to Developing Domestic Sources of Natural Rubber

Friday, September 5, 2014 *3 pm *148 Baker Sponsored by the Department of Chemistry

 

Dr. Katrina Cornish is the leading U.S. scientific expert, and is internationally recognized as a principalKatrina Cornish authority on alternative natural rubber production, properties and products, and on natural rubber biosynthesis. She joined Ohio State’s Horticulture and Crop Science department at OARDC-Wooster in 2010 as an Ohio Research Scholar. She holds the Endowed Chair in Bio-based Emergent Materials in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and is director of research for the Program of Excellence in Natural Rubber Alternatives. Her research focuses on bioemergent materials, including exploitation of opportunity feedstocks from agriculture and food processing wastes for value-added products and biofuels. Prior to coming to Ohio State, Dr. Cornish led the USDA’s development of domestic natural rubber and rubber latex sources; then, as senior vice president for research and development at Yulex Corporation, she oversaw the research, development, production, validation, and regulatory programs for the commercialization of guayule latex for safe medical devices and specialty consumer products. Her inventions at USDA were licensed by Yulex and form the foundation of the U.S. domestic rubber industry. A fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, she has 175 publications and patents. She holds a PhD from the University of Birmingham, England. 

 

Dale L. Travis Public Lecture Series
Robin Wall Kimmerer

Distinguished Teaching Professor,  Environmental and Forest Biology, and Director, Center for Native Peoples and the Environment, SUNY-ESF

The Honorable Harvest: Indigenous Knowledge and Conservation

Wednesday, September 24, 2014 * 7:30 pm * Gateway Center

Sponsored by the Department of Environmental and Forest Biology

 Reception and Book Signing to follow.  Haven’t yet picked up Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants Campus Bookstore will be open 6-7:15

 

http://www.humansandnature.org/filebin/images/scholar/earth/Kimmerer_Bio.jpgDr. Kimmer’s is the author of numerous scientific papers on plant ecology, bryophyte ecology, traditional knowledge and restoration ecology.  Her interests include the role of traditional ecological knowledge in ecological restoration and building resilience for climate change. In collaboration with tribal partners, she and her students have an active research program in the ecology and restoration of plants of cultural significance to Native people. She is active in efforts to broaden access to environmental science training for Native students, and to introduce the benefits of traditional ecological knowledge to the scientific community, in a way that respects and protects indigenous knowledge. Dr. Kimmerer is an enrolled member of the Citizen Band Potawatomi.  Her writings include “Gathering Moss” which incorporates both traditional indigenous knowledge and scientific perspectives and was awarded the prestigious John Burroughs Medal for Nature Writing in 2005, the newly released “Braiding Sweetgrass.”  She has served as writer in residence at Andrews Experimental Forest, Blue Mountain Center, the Sitka Center and others.   Her literary essays appear in Whole Terrain, Adirondack Life, Orion and several anthologies. Kimmerer holds a MS and PhD in Botany from the University of Wisconsin; she is also an ESF alumna (Botany, 1975).  Kimmerer is the co-founder and past president of the Traditional Ecological Knowledge section of the Ecological Society of America.

 


All presentations are free and open to the public.  Parking is available in Syracuse University's Irving Avenue Parking garage (area map; close up).  The fee is $3.50 for the first hour, $2 for each additional.


Presented by SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
and The ESF Women’s Caucus

Last updated 08/29/14

 

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