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SUNY ESF
Courses at Cranberry Lake

Schedule of Summer 2024 Courses at CLBS

Session Courses Dates
Session A EFB 202 May 19 - June 7
Session B EFB 202 June 9 - June 28
Session C Electives June 30 - July 12
Session D EFB 202 July 14 - August 2

 

Registration Information

Information sessions for summer courses will be held in January, dates forthcoming. Pre-registration for students requiring EFB 202 or a field elective will be open from February 19th to March 1st. Registration will then be closed until it reopens on April 1st to all students. This registration will be conducted on a first come, first serve basis.

Visiting students, including transfer students wishing to take a Cranberry Lake course before beginning class in the Fall must complete the registration form, and the visiting student form (available March 29th) below. Note that you may complete the Cranberry Lake registration form during the pre-registration window, and the visiting student form later.

Course Descriptions

EFB 202 Ecological Monitoring and Biodiversity Assessment (3)

Instructor of Record: K. Sheehan

This is one of the keystone courses in the Environmental and Forest Biology curriculum. Forty-five hours of lecture, laboratory and field instruction per week for three weeks. During the first two weeks of the course, students study a wide variety of northeastern North American terrestrial, wetland, and aquatic biodiversity with a focus on vascular plants and animals. Students then complete a group research project during the third and final week of the course. The research projects require proficiency in field sampling methods, basic experimental design and statistical analysis, and the ability to cooperatively solve problems. The course culminates in a research symposium during which groups present their findings to their peers and a panel of judges.

EFB 496: Adirondack Insects (3)

Instructors: E. Arsenault, M. Fierke

Course Description: A field course that introduces students to the diversity, behavior, and ecology of aquatic and terrestrial insects of the New York Adirondacks. Students will learn methods for collection and observation of insects in a variety of habitats and will use microscopes and dichotomous keys to identify collected insects based on unique morphological features. Students will apply skills learned in the course to conduct a group research project related to insects of the Adirondacks.

Prerequisite: One year of general biology.

EFB 496: Respectful Field Research Approaches (3)

Instructors: K. Artelle, N. Patterson

This field course will explore both the philosophy and approaches for studying wildlife that minimize harm and/or reflect dimensions of respect for wildlife under study, blending insights from Indigenous and western knowledges. Students will be introduced to, and/or use, a variety of minimally invasive field techniques and technologies (e.g. camera traps, drones, audio recorders). Students will work towards developing individualized respectful sampling protocols. For their final projects, students will make use of the techniques and insights they develop to conduct their own mini field research projects.

EFB 327: Adirondack Flora (3)

Instructors: A. Petzke, J. Ray

Two hours of lecture, and eight hours of field work and discussion each day for two weeks. An integrated field and laboratory course in the identification of vascular plants and recognition of ecological characteristics of major plant species and communities of the Adirondack Mountain region. Satisfies elective field study requirement in Environmental and Forest Biology. Appropriate for upper and lower division undergraduate students seeking instruction in plant identification and ecology. Summer, Cranberry Lake Biological Station. 

Prerequisite: General botany or general biology.

EFB 337: Field Ethnobotany (3)

Instructors: R. Kimmerer, T. Yakovleva

Two hours of lecture per week and six to eight hours of field work and discussion each day for two weeks. A field-based introduction to the identification and traditional cultural uses of plants in the Adirondack region for food, medicine and fiber. Topics include plant identification, traditional ecological knowledge and use of ecological and ethnobotanical methods. Satisfies elective field course requirement in programs offered by Department of Environmental and Forest Biology. Cranberry Lake Biological Station. Summer. Students must register for summer session, to which appropriate tuition and fees apply in addition to travel and lodging costs. 

EFB 388: Ecology of Adirondack Fishes (3)

Instructors: J. Farrell

Two hours of lecture, and eight hours of fieldwork and discussion each day for two weeks. An integrated field and laboratory course in the identification of fish and recognition of ecological characteristics of major fish species and communities of Adirondack waters. Satisfies a component of the field study elective requirement in Environmental and Forest Biology. Summer, Cranberry Lake Biological Station. Students must register for summer session, to which appropriate tuition and fees apply in addition to travel and lodging costs. 

Prerequisite: General zoology or general biology.

EFB 384: Field Herpetology (3)

Instructors: M.B Kolozsvary

Two hours of lecture, and eight hours of field work and discussion each day for two weeks. An integrated field and laboratory course in the identification, natural history, ecology, and conservation of amphibians and reptiles of the Adirondack region. Satisfies field study elective requirement in Environmental and Forest Biology. Summer, Cranberry Lake Biological Station. Students must register for summer session, to which appropriate tuition and fees apply in addition to travel and lodging costs. 

Prerequisite: General biology or general zoology.

Costs of Attendance

Course Instate Out of State

EFB 202

TBD

TBD

Electives

TBD 

TBD 

*Note these are estimates, please refer to the ESF Bursar's website for most up-to-date information.