Stewart Diemont | Environmental and Forest Biology | SUNY-ESF
e s f home link - e s f college of environmental science and forestry
e s f home link - e s f college of environmental science and forestry

Stewart DiemontAssociate Professor

Stewart Diemont

460 Illick Hall
1 Forestry Drive
Syracuse, NY 13210

315-470-4707 | 315-470-6760
sdiemont@esf.edu

Office: 460 Illick Hall

Lab: 221 Illick Hall

Selected Publications

*Barlet, N.T., S.A.W. Diemont, M.A. Teece, K.L. Schulz, 2015. Emergent microbial food webs in ecological treatment systems for wastewater: Insight from stable carbon isotopes. Ecological Engineering, 62-71.

*Falkowski, T.B., *I. Martinez-Bautista, S.A.W. Diemont, 2015. How valuable could traditional ecological knowledge education be for a resource-limited future?: An emergy evaluation in two Mexican villages. Ecological Modelling 300: 40-49.

Beutel, M. W., S.A.W. Diemont, D. Reinhold, 2015. The 13th annual conference of the American ecological engineering society: Ecological engineering and the dawn of the 21st century. Ecological Engineering 78: 1-5.

Nigh, R., S.A.W. Diemont, 2014. The Mayan milpa: Fire and the legacy of living soil. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 11: e45–e54.

*Bohn, J., S.A.W. Diemont, J. Gibbs, S. Stehman, and J. Mendoza 2014. Implications of Mayan forest restoration and subsistence agriculture for biodiversity conservation in the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve, Mexico. Agroforestry Systems 88: 269-285.

Ferguson, B.G., S.A.W. Diemont, †R. Alfaro, J.F. Martin, J.N. Toral, J.D. Álvarez Solís, 2013. Sustainability of holistic and conventional cattle ranching in the seasonally dry tropics of Chiapas, Mexico. Agricultural Systems 120: 38-48.

*Lin, H., S.A.W. Diemont, T. Toland, D. Daley, W. Tao, D. Johnson, 2013. Vermifiltration ecological treatment for the re-use of food waste digestate. Water Environment Research 85(11): 2184-2193.

Endreny, T. A., S.A.W. Diemont, 2012. Methods for assessing stormwater management at archaeological sites: Copan Ruins case study. Journal of Archaeological Science 39(8): 2637-2642.

†Cheng, K., S.A.W. Diemont, and A.P. Drew, 2011. Role of tao (Belotia mexicana) in traditional 2Lacandon Maya shifting cultivation. Agroforestry systems 82(3): 331-336.

Diemont, S.A.W., *J. Bohn, *D. Rayome, *S. Kelsen, and †K.Cheng, 2011. Comparisons of Mayan forest management, restoration, and conservation. Forest Ecology and Management 261(10): 1696-1705.

Martin, J.F., E. Roy, S.A.W. Diemont, and B.G. Ferguson, 2010. Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK): Ideas, inspiration, and designs for ecological engineering. Ecological Engineering 36: 839-849.

†Alfaro, R., S.A.W. Diemont, B.G. Ferguson, J.F. Martin, J. Nahed, D. Álvarez, and R. Pinto Ruíz, 2010. Steps toward sustainable ranching: An emergy evaluation of conventional and holistic management in Chiapas, Mexico. Agricultural Systems 103(9): 639-646.

Diemont, S.A.W., T.J. Lawrence, and T.A. Endreny, 2010. Envisioning ecological engineering education: An international survey of the educational and professional community. Ecological Engineering 36: 570-578.

Diemont, S.A.W., J.F. Martin, 2009. Lacandon Maya ecological management: A sustainable design for environmental restoration and human subsistence. Ecological Applications 19: 254-266.

Diemont, S.A.W., J.F. Martin, S.I. Levy-Tacher, R.B. Nigh, P. Ramirez-Lopez, and J. D. Golicher, 2006. Lacandon Maya forest management: restoration of soil fertility using native tree species. Ecological Engineering 28: 205-212.

Martin, J.F., S.A.W. Diemont, E. Powell, M. Stanton, and S.I. Levy-Tacher, 2006. Emergy evaluation of the performance and sustainability of three agricultural systems with different scales and management. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 115: 128-140.

Diemont, S.A.W., 2006. Mosquito larvae density and pollutant removal in tropical wetland treatment systems in Honduras. Environment International 32: 332-341.

Diemont, S.A.W., J.F. Martin, and S.I. Levy-Tacher, 2006. Emergy evaluation of Lacandon Maya indigenous swidden agroforestry in Chiapas, Mexico. Agroforestry Systems 66: 23-42.

Diemont, S.A.W., J.F. Martin, 2005. Management impacts on the trophic diversity of nematode communities in an indigenous agroforestry system of Chiapas, Mexico. Pedobiologia 49: 325-334.

* Advisee

† Major role on graduate committee

Current Graduate Advisees

Current Graduate Advisees

Adam FixAdam Fix
ajfix@syr.edu

  • Degree Sought: PHD
  • Graduate Advisor(s): Diemont
  • Area of Study: Coupled Natural and Human Systems
  • Undergraduate Institution: SUNY Center Buffalo
  • Previous Graduate Study: Canisius College

Personal Statement
Adam's research uses qualitative methods to inform an urgent question in environmental policy conversations—how might we work across cultures to build sustainable more-than-human communities? Adam's dissertation project examines the beliefs and strategies of self-proclaimed “allies” of Indigenous-led environmental protection movements in New York and Chiapas (Mexico). Since 2014, he has worked as an adjunct professor in the Department of Philosophy at Canisius College in Buffalo, NY.

Areas of Competency
Environmental Social Movements; Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK); Indigenous Studies; Oral History & Ethnography.


Jorge Jose Garcia PoloJorge Jose Garcia Polo
jgarci16@syr.edu

  • Degree Sought: PHD
  • Graduate Advisor(s): Diemont
  • Area of Study: Ecosystem Restoration

Shruti MokashiShruti Mokashi
samokash@syr.edu

  • Degree Sought: PHD
  • Graduate Advisor(s): Diemont
  • Area of Study: Environmental and Community Land Planning
  • Undergraduate Institution: University of Pune (Environmental Science)
  • Previous Graduate Study: University of Pune (Environmental Science)

Links
Web Link

Graduate Research Topic
My dissertation research is situated at the intersection of local communities & conservation with a focus on understanding the relationship between people and ‘sacred forests’ in western part of India.

Research Interests
Community based conservation, sacred natural sites, traditional ecological knowledge, ethics and community based research, ethnographic methods.


Lucia Perez VolkowLucia Perez Volkow
lperezvo@syr.edu

  • Degree Sought: MS
  • Graduate Advisor(s): Diemont
  • Area of Study: Coupled Natural and Human Systems

Annabel Roberts-McMichaelAnnabel Roberts-McMichael
arober10@syr.edu

  • Degree Sought: MS
  • Graduate Advisor(s): Diemont
  • Area of Study: Coupled Natural and Human Systems
  • Undergraduate Institution: Cooper Union (Fine Art)

Personal Statement
With a background in art, non-profit organization management, organic farming, place-based education and food justice, I am grateful to now be at ESF to learn and develop new understanding of human beings' relationship with Northeast deciduous forest ecosystems: what are Indigenous Peoples' of this region relationships, roles and actions in the forests? What guidance do Indigenous Nations share for how they and non-indigenous inhabitants can improve relationships with forest ecosystems? What are the best of Western science's approaches to forest management that supports cultural, subsistence and non-timber, coupled natural and human systems? How can all those who are here enact peaceful, just, equitable and regenerative relationships with these forests and waters through new and renewed social ecological systems?

Graduate Research Topic
A case study of Indigenous Peoples' access to public/ancestral lands in New York State for essential traditional and customary purposes, such as hunting, fishing, gathering, conservation activities and education. This study focuses on lands managed by the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation and Haudenosaunee Nations' access.

Home Page
Annabel Roberts-McMichaels' Artwork & Land-Based Education Website


John ZeigerJohn Zeiger
jozeiger@syr.edu

  • Degree Sought: MS
  • Graduate Advisor(s): Diemont
  • Area of Study: Conservation Biology