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e s f home link - e s f college of environmental science and forestry

Subject to Change due to COVID-19

The current ESF Catalog is online only, and is updated as needed throughout the year. To view the version officially associated with a particular year of entry to the College, please refer to the appropriate catalog of record.

**Please note that certain classes are permitted to charge course fees that SUNY has approved. Please refer to the detailed list to see if a class you are interested in has a mandatory fee associated with it, and the amount of the fee. For a detailed listing, click here.

ESF Course Descriptions

EST 132 Orientation Seminar for Environmental Studies (1)
One hour of lecture, discussion and/or exercises per week. Introduction to campus resources available to ensure academic success. Introduction to Environmental Studies as a field of inquiry, and the three option areas that the department offers. Fall.

EST 133 Introduction to Environmental Studies (3)
Three hours of lecture, discussion and analytical activities per week. Gateway course for EST majors. Introduction to the study of environmental problems in the social sciences and humanities. Topics: pollution, conservation, preservation, human health, ecosystem health, limits to growth, sustainability, ecosystems, population, energy, risk and traditional knowledge. Fall.

EST 140 Introduction to Native Peoples, Lands & Cultures (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introductory survey of the history, geography, economy, and culture of Native Americans from prehistory to present, with special attention to the Great Lakes region/upstate New York and environmental topics. Draws on texts, films, guest speakers, and other resources. Spring.

EST 200 Cultural Ecology (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion/oral presentations per week. Students develop skills and fluency in preparing, delivering and evaluating multicultural and traditional environmental management and decision-making. Emphasis is on situations encountered in the environmental professions. Case studies pose ethical questions, which challenge students to apply theory and analysis to each case. Topics also include interactions of culture and environment, relationship between traditional and scientific knowledge and co-management as multicultural decision making. Self-evaluation and peer evaluations are emphasized. Fall or Spring.

EST 201 US History Reconstruction to the Present (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. History of changes occurring in America post 1865 including land use, government, economic and international relations. Spring.

EST 202 American History: From Discovery to Civil War (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. A survey of American history considering the origin and development of American institutions and ideals, from the discovery of the New World through the Civil War. Students are introduced to works of major historians and to various interpretations of American history.

EST 203 Introduction to Sociology (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. General introductory principles and methods of sociology including group dynamics and development, different structural arrangement of social groups, community development and adjustment processes, relationships with the natural environment. Spring.

EST 204 Diversity and Knowledge of the Environment (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion. This course explores the ways that diverse peoples and communities understand the natural environment. 'Diverse' includes groups, societies, and cultures understood as minority and/or marginalized. Introduces concepts of epistemology and ontology. Emphasizes learning in Syracuse area; explores roles of the African diaspora and also indigenous peoples (Native Americans). Fall.

EST 220 Urban Ecology (3)
Two hours lecture/discussion, three hours of outdoor laboratory per week. Explores the city from an ecosystems perspective. Addresses the role and importance of science, engineering, the design professions, and community participation in creating livable communities. Environmental equity and justice are addressed. Fall.

EST 221 Introduction to American Government (3)
Three contact hours per week. Describes American political system and its roles and functions in society. Examines how political processes change over time, including the role of rhetoric and argumentation in policy development. Explores critical analysis of political phenomena. Fall.

EST 231 Environmental Geology (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Environmental Geology is an applied field of study that uses geological information to assist in resolving human conflicts related to land use issues, environmental damage, and resource use. Topics include natural resources, energy, environmental pollution, waste disposal, geological hazards and climate change. Spring.

EST 245 Foundations of Environmental Communication (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Survey of environmental communication, including nature representions in popular culture, and the role of mass media on public perceptions of environmental issues. Topics also include strategic communication, public participation in environmental decision-making, and environmental risk perception. Exposure to communication theory and social scientific and humanities-based approaches. Fall.

EST 255 Research Methods for Environmental Studies (3)
Three hours of lecture, discussion and analytical activities per week. An introductory methods course focused on research techniques used in environmental and natural resources social science research. This course reviews quantitative and qualitative methodologies for environmental studies research including but not limited to questionnaires, in-depth interviews, rhetorical critiques and content analyses. Spring. Pre- or Co-requisite: EWP 290

EST 296 Special Topics in Environmental Studies (1 - 3)
Experimental, interdisciplinary or special coursework at the freshman or sophomore levels. Subject matter and course format vary from semester to semester or offering on the basis of needs and objectives of the course. Fall or Spring.

EST 301 Leadership through Mentoring (1)
Biweekly meetings with instructors and with first-year student groups. Advanced leadership training for students in the ESF Peer Mentoring Program. Use of online resources to augment person-to-person interactions and group meetings. Fall. Prerequisites: Upper division class standing, participation in the Peer Review Mentoring Program, and successful completion of Orientation Leader training.

EST 312 Sociology of Natural Resources (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. The concepts and principles of sociology as applied to natural resource questions. Concepts of community, forest dependent communities, shared identity and social structures of resource based groups. The forest as an integrated social and biological community. Spring

EST 321 Government and the Environment (3)
Three contact hours per week. Examines the relationship between government and the environment, primarily in the U.S. Introduces environmental policy, including the policy making process. Reviews legal framework and current issues in several thematic areas (e.g., air, water, hazardous waste, and endangered species protection). Spring

EST 353 Behavior Change and the Environment (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Overview of theory, research, and methods in environmental psychology and sustainable behavior. Explores the role of human behavior as a root cause of environmental degradation and examines the contribution of individual and societal processes. The cognitive-behavioral perspective is emphasized in understanding these issues. Fall, odd years.

EST 361 History of the American Environmental Movement (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. The historic and cultural origins and evolution of this complex, multifaceted social phenomenon called the environmental movement and its influence on public policies, values and lifestyles. The events, personages, philosophies and historical/cultural processes that marked and continue to drive various, competing attitudes toward nature, even within the United States environmental movement. Fall.

EST 366 Attitudes, Values and the Environment (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Historical roots of environmental attitudes, values, and ethics with special emphasis on how individual attitudes impact environmental issues. Perspectives on man's relationship and responsibility to nature. Value implications of ecological principles and concepts. Examples of current environmental issues are examined in this context. Fall, even years. Prerequisites: Junior status or permission of instructor.

EST 370 Introduction to Personal Environmental Interpretation Methods (3)
Two hours of lecture and 2 hours of recitation per week. One required Saturday field trip. Personal interpretation teaches a variety of face-to-face techniques used to connect the public with environmental science by providing an introduction to history of interpretation, popular interpretive and environmental education activities and curriculum, evaluation of programs, and lesson plans. Explores and illustrates the research and philosophy of environmental interpretation. Fall. Prerequisite(s): EFB 320, junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor Note: Credit will not be granted for both EST 370 and EST 570.

EST 388 Psychological Principles of Risk Communication (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Presents socio-psychological principles and theoretical underpinnings guiding the applied social science approach to environmental risk communication issues. Three overlapping themes will be considered and linked: how communities cope with environmental hazards, how risk information is cognitively processed and evaluated and how risk communication influences perception, evaluation and behavior. Spring, even years.

EST 390 Social Processes and the Environment (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Explores alternative ways of explaining the relationship between social processes and environmental conditions. Analyzes classical and modern social theories and applies their insights to questions of human-environment interaction. Introduces qualitative social science research methods and the social construction of environmental meaning. Fall or Spring.

EST 395 Public Communication of Science and Technology (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Survey of public communication of science and technology (PCST). Considers the structure, meanings, and implications of PCST, including contexts in which it occurs. Topics also include motivations and constraints of those who produce PCST, and function of PCST in contemporary society. Exposure to communication theory and social scientific research methods and analysis. Spring. Prerequisite(s): EST 245 and junior standing, or permission of the instructor.

EST 400 Senior Paper (3)
Individual study of an environmental topic resulting in a formal report that meets the requirements for an environmental studies synthesis experience. These requirements are identified in course meetings. Students shall report their activities to their instructor on a weekly basis for the duration of the course. Enrollment is restricted to environmental studies seniors. Fall and Spring.

EST 401 Environmental Ethics and Culture: Perspectives on the Adirondack Park (3)
Introduction to the ethics of land-use conflicts in the Adirondacks, NY. This course links the philosophical history of ethics with contemporary principles of environmental ethics and advocacy. Topics include agency, ethics, value theory, morality and responsibility in the context of ongoing regional debates. Requires concurrent registration with other Sustaining the Park courses. Fall, Newcomb Campus. Prerequisite(s): none. Co-requisites: EFB 411, EST 402, EST 403, EST 404.

EST 402 Diverse Perspectives on a common landscape: Experiencing the Adirondack Park (3)
Two hours of lecture and three hours per week of immersion in Adirondack issues including introduction to diverse stakeholders and perspectives through non-governmental, agency, and community meetings; interaction with an array of regional experts through special panel discussions; and field trips to and private tours of historic and cultural sites and institutions. Requires concurrent registration with other Sustaining the Park courses. Fall, Newcomb Campus. Prerequisite(s): none. Co-requisites: EFB 411, EST 401, EST 403, EST 404.

EST 403 Sustainable Development: An Adirondack Park Case Study (3)
A place based study of the concepts of sustainable development and their application. Students will learn of the role of historical precedence and current context in approaching planning and policy for a sustainable future. The course will combine lecture, discussion, student led seminars and writing that illustrates both skills in analysis and synthesis. Class will meet once a week for three hours for fourteen weeks at the ESF Newcomb campus, and may require occasional field trips. Requires concurrent registration with other Sustaining the Park courses. Fall, Newcomb Campus. Prerequisites: none. Co-requisites: EFB 411, EST 401, EST 402, EST 404.

EST 404 Using Past Exp. to Inform Future Managmt: Synthesizing the Adirondack Park (3)
Three hours of lecture/seminar/discussion per week. Synthesis of experiences, content and insights gained during the "Sustaining the Adirondack Park" residential semester, including Capstone research and production of an independent position paper and collaborative comprehensive management plan. Requires concurrent registration with other Sustaining the Park courses. Fall, Newcomb Campus. Prerequisite(s): none. Co-requisites: EFB 411, EST 401, EST 402, EST 403.

EST 405 Gender, Culture, and the Environment (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Fall only. Compare the politics of gender, identity (race, class, ability, nationality, ethnicity), belonging, and power to social institutions and environmental agendas. Investigate how notions of gender intersect with social structures, institutions, and policies that govern lives and the environment. Analyze the ways in which social arrangements and unequal relations of power connect to environmental degradation and environmental issues, movements, and activism. No prerequisite required.

EST 415 Environmental Justice (3)
Three hours of seminar/discussion per week. This course introduces students to the unique environmental vulnerabilities that marginalized communities are at heightened exposure to, within a multitude of contexts, including: toxics siting, public health disparities and food access. It examines political and economic conditions that promote environmental inequality and explores the history of environmental exploitation of vulnerable populations. Additionally, it evaluates contemporary issues along with community and public responses to threats.

EST 426 Community Planning and Sustainability (3)
Three hours of lecture and demonstration per week. Presents ecological planning and development concepts and theory guiding local and global initiatives for sustainable development. Overlapping themes are considered and linked: the relationship between landscape patterns reflecting wealth, poverty and environmental quality; the role of efficiency in reducing environmental impacts; and the questions of environmental equality, and the quality of development. Fall.

EST 427 Environmental and Energy Auditing (3)
Three hours of lecture, demonstration, and discussion per week. Presents environmental and energy auditing concepts and theory guiding local and regional initiatives for greenhouse gas production and energy use reduction. This course utilizes a practicum approach through use of inventory and analysis tools by student teams for project application. Spring. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EST 427 and EST 627.

EST 450 Sustainable Enterprise (3)
Three hours of classroom/presentation per week. Economic, social, and environmental dimensions of sustainability and their interdependence. Influences on organizations to adopt sustainable approaches to operations and activities. Tools to validate organizational sustainability. Transdisciplinary emphasis. Fall. Note: This course is cross-listed at SU School of Management as LPP/SHR 450.

EST 460 Land Use Law (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. This course provides an understanding of U.S., state and local laws affecting land use in New York in the context of current environmental policy debates. Students learn to recognize and analyze legal issues involving land use in varying contexts. Spring. Prerequisites: EST 221 or permission of the instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EST 460 and EST 660.

EST 470 Water in the Middle East: Issues and Opportunities (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Seminar on water issues and initiatives in Israel, Jordan, and the Palestinian Territories. Participants explore a variety of perspectives on the biophysical, historical, and sociocultural roots of transboundary and other water-related issues in the region, as well as an array of top-down (technological, managerial) and bottom-up (community-based, participatory) approaches to developing solutions. Designed for students interested in environmental and natural resource policy, water resources, international relations, conflict resolution, and related fields. Each week, students write short commentaries on required readings; the essays serve as starting point for class discussion. Over the course of the semester, students develop and submit a research paper on a related topic. Spring. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EST 470 and 670.

EST 471 Non-Personal Environmental Interpretation Methods (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Applications of environmental interpretation theory and methods applied to nature center programming, science education, and various fields of resource management emphasizing procedures for creating non-personal interpretive media (e.g., brochures, wayside exhibits, etc.). Focus on service-learning through involvement with an outside interpretive agency. Spring. Prerequisite(s): EST 370 or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EST 471 and EST 671.

EST 472 Natural History Museums and Modern Science (3)
Three hours lecture per week and one week field trip. Examination of the major roles of contemporary natural history museums as places of research and public education. Emphasis on research, exhibits, collections and programs. Organized instructional visit to natural history museums during a 1-week trip. Travel expenses apply. Prerequisite(s): EST 471 or permission of the instructor

EST 474 Advanced Interpretation and Environmental Education (3)
Three hours of lecture, discussion, and practical exercises per week. This course provides in-depth experience in planning and implementing environmental education and interpretation (EE&I) programs. Students may receive their Certified Interpretive Guide credential from the National Association for Interpretation. Learners will practice engagement with EE&I community partners, such as parks, nature centers, zoos, non-profit organizations and historical sites. With these partners, students will design and offer EE&I programs and lessons. Advanced readings from the research-based literature will offer critical examination of challenges in EE&I, including climate change education, and diversity, equity, and inclusivity in EE&I. Spring. Prerequisite(s): EST 370 and junior or senior status; or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EST 474 and 674.

EST 491 Environmental Studies Field Trip (1 - 3)
A five- to 10-day trip to visit with: 1) agencies, organizations, or institutions engaged in environmental research, education, communication interpretation, management, or administration; or 2) regions or areas of unusual environmental interest. A final report is required. Additional fees required to cover cost of travel and lodging during field portion of course. Tuition charges will apply to sections offered during Maymester or other summer sessions. Instructor permission required. Fall, Spring, or Summer.

EST 492 Undergraduate Experience in College Teaching (1 - 3)
This course is an opportunity for qualified undergraduate students to gain experience in fully supervised, college-level teaching of the type they can expect to perform in graduate school. Students assist the instructor in the preparation and delivery of course materials and preparing laboratories (when applicable). A maximum of 6 credit hours of EST 492, and 3 credit hours relating to any single assisted course, may apply toward graduation requirements. (Fall and Spring). Prerequisites: Previous completion of the course being assisted (with a grade of B or higher), a GPA at ESF of 3.0 or higher, and permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Previous completion of the course being assisted (with a grade of B or higher), a GPA at ESF of 3.0 or higher, and permission of instructor.

EST 493 Environmental Communication Workshop (3)
Three hours of cooperative learning activities, lecture and discussion per week. A workshop format on a specified environmental program or issue introduces the theories and skills of alternative dispute resolution approaches, public participation structures and dynamics, public policy decision making and implementation, risk communication, leadership styles, and small group dynamics. Spring. Prerequisite: Senior status or permission of instructor.

EST 494 Senior Seminar in Environmental Studies (1)
Two-hour seminar every two weeks. For all seniors in Environmental Studies. Students will prepare portfolios and give capstone presentations on their senior synthesis project and develop career goals and plans. Spring. Prerequisites: Limited to graduating seniors in the Department of Environmental Studies.

EST 495 Selected Readings in Environmental Studies (1 - 3)
An in-depth and independent exploration of selected readings from the environmentally related literature. Emphasis is placed on gaining insights and understanding from the readings, rather than producing an extensive bibliography. Students shall report their activities to their instructor on a weekly basis for the duration of the course. Fall, Spring and Summer. Prerequisite: Approval of study plan by instructor.

EST 496 Special Topics in Environmental Studies (1 - 3)
Special topics of current interest to undergraduate students in environmental studies and related fields. A detailed course subject description will be presented as the topic area is identified and developed. Fall, Spring and Summer. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

EST 498 Introductory Research Problems (1 - 3)
Guided individual study of an environmental topic. Emphasis is on the study procedure and the methods employed. Students shall report their activities to their instructor on a weekly basis for the duration of the course. Fall, Spring and Summer. Prerequisite: Approval of study plan by instructor.

EST 499 Environmental Studies Internship (1 - 12)
Internships provide students with a supervised field experience to apply and extend their academic abilities in a professional working environment. Students shall report their activities to their instructor on a weekly basis for the duration of the course. Fall, Spring and Summer. Prerequisites: Environmental Studies senior status and written approval of an internship contract by major professor, curriculum director and field supervisor.

EST 550 Environmental Impact Analysis (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. The law, administration and natural/social science basis of the environmental impact assessment process in the federal government and New York state. Fall. Prerequisite: Graduate matriculation or permission of instructor.

EST 555 Public Relations Management for Environmental Professionals (3)
Explores the public relations profession from a management perspective. Includes foundations of ethics, law, and theory. Focuses on public relations functions relative to culture and society. Examines professional communication processes and practices. Provides practice in public relations skills of preparing audience-centered materials and managing media relations. Offered online. Fall or Spring. Prerequisite: Graduate students status or permission of instructor.

EST 570 Introduction to Personal Environmental Interpretation Methods (3)
Two hours of lecture and 2 hours of recitation per week. One required Saturday field trip. Personal interpretation teaches a variety of face-to-face techniques used to connect the public with environmental science by providing an introduction to history of interpretation, popular interpretive and environmental education activities and curriculum, evaluation of programs, and lesson plans. Explores and illustrates the research and philosophy of environmental interpretation. Discuss interpretive research, plan and lead lectures, and mentor/ evaluate undergraduates. Fall. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing, or permission of instructor Note: Credit will not be granted for both EST 370 and EST 570.

EST 573 Electronic Technology in Environmental Education & Interpretation (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Explores research and practice in the use of electronic technologies in interpretive fields and environmental science fields. Demonstrates techniques used to engage the public with cultural and natural resources. Even years. Spring. Prerequisite(s): EST 370 or EST 570; junior, senior, or graduate standing.

EST 600 Foundations of Environmental Studies (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Examines frameworks for understanding and solving environmental problems. Familiarizes students with the epistemological foundations of environment-society relations. Considers multiple methodological and analytical strategies. Uses a case study method to exemplify key principles. Fall. Prerequisites: Undergraduate courses in general ecology, environmental science and policy or communication theory.

EST 603 Research Methods and Design (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Comprehensive survey of research methods and design for Environmental Studies. Topics covered include the scientific method; research design; quantitative, qualitative, and mixed research methods; sampling; data collection techniques; data analysis and interpretation; research ethics; and research proposal development. Fall.

EST 604 Social Survey Research Methods for Environmental Issues (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Provides a critical overview of survey methods used to study human dimension of environmental problems. Explores fundamental theories, techniques, and applications of environmentally related social survey research processes. Design of original survey research and critical assessment of existing research. Spring, odd years. Prerequisite: Undergraduate basic statistics course.

EST 605 Qualitative Methods (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Survey of the generally recognized paradigms and methods that qualitative researchers use to better understand, evaluate, and perhaps influence complex social phenomenon. Research proposal, pilot study, final report and oral presentation required. Spring, even years.

EST 606 Public Perception and Communication of Risk, Science and Environment (3)
Online. Scientific and technological advancements entail both benefits and risks. How people perceive those benefits and risks will influence their acceptance or rejection of specific advances. In this research seminar you will learn about the factors that influence peopleís perception of risk, science and environmental change, and learn how communication shapes the possibilities for dialog and decision making. In this course you will be part of a research team, defining and carrying out a research project. Spring.

EST 608 Environmental Advocacy Campaigns and Conflict Resolution (3)
Online. Addresses complex dynamics, strategies, and tactics of (1) organized campaigns by grassroots to international organizations to advocate for particular environmental policy, and (2) processes that seek to resolve, manage, or prevent environmental conflicts when appropriate. The course includes synchronous and asynchronous discussions, readings, simulation activities, case study assessments, and semester-long research projects. Fall.

EST 609 Collaborative Governance Processes for Environmental and Natural Resource Management (3)
Intensive study in early January. Introduces the evolution of innovative multi-stakeholder processes that characterize collaborative governance (CG). Distinguishes CG from traditional public involvement and dispute resolution approaches, and explores its challenges and opportunities. Provides knowledge and introductory tools to design and be more productive participants in collaborative processes. Spring.

EST 612 Environmental Policy and Governance (3)
Online. Three hours of lecture and related activities. Examination of the dynamic relationships present in the creation and implementation of environmental policies. Considers the roles of the state, the private sector, and nongovernmental organizations. Explores background and implications of recent trends in environmental governance. Spring

EST 613 Urbanization and the Environment (3)
This course provides a foundation for researching and writing about the social, political, economic, and material aspects of urban infrastructures and networks, resource development, urban environmental governance and decision-making as well as the practices of urban planners, engineers, and scientists in shaping urban space and processes. Spring.

EST 615 Environmental Justice: Policy, Tools & Society (3)
Online. This course provides legal, policy and management tools to understand and advance environmental justice. The approach is interdisciplinary and includes analytical tools used in geography, environmental and public health, policy and law, and critical race theory. The course will expose students to the unique environmental vulnerabilities that marginalized communities are at heightened exposure to, including toxics siting, public health disparities and food access, while featuring pathways towards building sustainable and just societies. Fall.

EST 616 Global Perspectives on Environmental Justice (3)
Online. This course examines environmental and social justice conflicts from a global/international perspective. We discuss distributional justice issues of hazardous waste sites around the world and related procedural injustices in siting, operation, and human rights concerns. Through case studies and research, students analyze crucial processes and relations generating environmental inequalities at different scales and investigate how economiesí extractive activities generate conflicts and resistance across the world. Learning activities include participating on a course discussion board, conducting interviews, engaging in media analyses, peer review, mini group projects, journal reflections, and a final presentation. Spring.

EST 617 Measuring Environmental Inequality (3)
Online. This graduate-level, seminar-style course focuses on how environmental inequalities are operationalized and measured in research and public policy contexts. The methods of measuring environmental inequality are based on what is necessary to move toward a world with socially and environmentally equitable outcomes: engagement with and cultivation of community capacity to understand and respond to environmental concerns; collaboration based on morally and empirically sound principles; and making a visible and positive difference for communities. Utilizing synchronous and asynchronous methods, this course reviews contributions by community-based and thought leaders; frameworks for structuring and maintaining community ties; and ethical considerations for working with indigenous and other historically colonized communities. It offers examples of operationalization with a focus on public health research. Spring.

EST 624 Nature, Recreation, and Society (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Introduces students to the theoretical underpinnings of tourism studies, and how "naturalness" contributes to the generation of environmental meaning. The course will examine linkages between society, recreation, tourism, and nature, and will attend to such concepts as sense of place, experience, power, and perception as they relate to nature and recreation. These concepts provide useful entry points into more critical investigations of tourism and recreation practices and motivations, and serve as points of departure for conversations about eco-imperialism, green-washing, and the marginalization and dispossession of local populations. Discussion related to the aforementioned critical investigations will be paired with attention to the experiential side of recreation, tourism, and nature. That is, how the act of pursuing nature and related natural adventure contributes to the development of identity, our knowledge of the reciprocal relationship between sense of self and sense of place, and how these concepts are dependent upon and manifest themselves differently in various sites and experiences. Fall.

EST 627 Environmental and Energy Auditing (3)
Three hours of lecture, demonstration, and discussion per week. Presents environmental and energy auditing concepts and theory guiding local and regional initiatives for greenhouse gas production and energy use reduction. This course utilizes a practicum approach through use of inventory and analysis tools by student teams for project application. Spring. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EST 427 and EST 627.

EST 635 Public Participation and Decision Making: Theory and Application (3)
Online. Three hours of lecture/discussion, groupwork, and related learning activities. Provides a student with fundamental theories and techniques for developing and applying citizen participation strategies as they relate to environmental decision-making. Spring

EST 640 Environmental Thought and Ethics (3)
Online. 3 hours of lecture and discussion. Concepts and tools of environmental philosophy and ethics, with a focus on application to current issues in environmental problem-solving. Special attention to the role of language in questions of environmental ethics and decision making. Fall.

EST 645 Mass Media and Environmental Affairs (3)
Three hours of discussion per week. Introduces the mass media's role in environmental affairs. Relationships between media organizations, technology, content, and audiences frame examination of how nature and environmental issues and problems are engaged by the media and with what consequences. News and current affairs, advertising and entertainment genres are considered. Fall.

EST 650 Environmental Perception and Human Behavior (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Application of environmental perception and human behavior paradigms and theories in understanding the causes and potential solution strategies to environmental issues. Interdisciplinary approach utilizes concepts, theories and research from disciplines including environmental psychology, sociology, anthropology, and risk perception to understand the myriad influences on human behavior as it relates to environmental impacts. Spring.

EST 652 Managing Sustainability: Purpose, Principles, and Practice (3)
Three hours of lecture, discussion, and/or field trips per week. Dynamics and interdependence of economic, social, and environmental systems. Sustainable management frameworks, tools, and metrics. Local, national, and international implications. Relevance of technology, ethics, law, and policy. Interdisciplinary emphasis. At least 1X Fall or Spring.

EST 660 Land Use Law (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. This course provides an understanding of U.S., state and local laws affecting land use in New York, in the context of current environmental policy debates. Students learn to recognize and analyze legal issues involving land use in varying contexts. Spring.

EST 670 Water in the Middle East: Issues and Opportunities (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Seminar on water issues and initiatives in Israel, Jordan, and the Palestinian Territories. Participants explore a variety of perspectives on the biophysical, historical, and sociocultural roots of transboundary and other water-related issues in the region, as well as an array of top-down (technological, managerial) and bottom-up (community-based, participatory) approaches to developing solutions. Designed for graduate students in environmental and natural resource policy, water resources, international relations, conflict resolution, and related fields. Each week, graduate students write short critical commentaries on required readings; the essays serve as starting point for class discussion. Over the course of the semester, students develop and submit a research paper on a related topic. Spring. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EST 670 and 470.

EST 671 Non-Personal Environmental Interpretation Methods (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. Applications of environmental interpretation theory and methods applied to nature center programming, science education, and various fields of resource management emphasizing procedures for creating non-personal interpretive media (e.g., brochures, wayside exhibits, etc.). Focus on service-learning through involvement with an outside interpretive agency. Submit an interpretive article for publication, read and hold online discussions of research on hon-personal interpretation, and evaluate local interpretive media. Spring. Prerequisite(s): EST 570 or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EST 471 and EST 671.

EST 674 Advanced Interpretation and Environmental Education (3)
Three hours of lecture, discussion, and practical exercises per week. This course provides in-depth experience in planning and implementing environmental education and interpretation (EE&I) programs. Students may receive their Certified Interpretive Guide credential from the National Association for Interpretation. Learners will serve as facilitative leaders for team engagement with EE&I community partners, such as parks, nature centers, zoos, non-profit organizations and historical sites. With these partners, students will design and offer EE&I programs and lessons. Students will prepare case studies to present advanced readings from the research-based literature regarding critical challenges in EE&I, including climate change education, and diversity, equity, and inclusivity in EE&I. Spring. Prerequisite(s): EST 570 and graduate standing; or permission of instructor. Note: Credit will not be granted for both EST 474 and 674.

EST 690 International Environmental Policy Consultancy (3 - 4)
Group research practicum. An innovative, collaborative, applied course and practicum in environmental policy consultation at the global level. May be linked via digital/ online technology with students in a parallel course at another, international institution. Students engage in a semester-long, consultancy project with an international organization engaged in environmental policymaking. Client organization and topic may vary annually. Students learn group consulting skills including issue definition and stakeholder identification; proposal preparation, team building and leadership skills; data collection, analysis and interpretation; report writing and presentation skills. Students fulfill the client's Terms of Reference, producing and delivering contributions towards final, agreed-upon deliverables. Fall or Spring. Instructor's permission required.

EST 691 Environmental Studies Field Trip (1 - 3)
A five- to 10-day trip to visit with: 1) agencies, organizations, or institutions engaged in environmental research, education, communication interpretation, management, or administration; or 2) regions or areas of unusual environmental interest. A final report is required. Additional fees required to cover cost of travel and lodging during field portion of course. Tuition charges will apply to sections offered during Maymester or other summer sessions. Instructor permission required. Fall, Spring, or Summer.

EST 695 Environmental Journalism (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. This course covers a range of topics related to journalism: interviewing, writing the lead, style, writing and organizing the story, layout, editing and revising, writing features and follow-up stories, covering speeches, etc. In addition, students explore how the media covers scientific and environmental issues. Students work on writing skills--from basic editing techniques to more sophisticated areas of style. Spring.

EST 696 Special Topics in Environmental Studies (1 - 3)
One to three hours of lecture and discussion per week. Experimental and developmental courses in new areas of interest to environmental studies faculty and graduate students not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Fall and Spring.

EST 702 Environmental and Natural Resource Program Evaluation (3)
Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. The systematic analysis of public environmental programs with an emphasis on the evaluation of resultant environmental outcomes. Topics include evaluation contexts, objective setting, environmental monitoring, and analysis of agency organization and procedures. Spring.

EST 705 Environmental Policy Analysis (3)
Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. This course covers current and classic literature in environmental policy analysis, as well as a variety of approaches to policy analysis that are relevant for working through complex environmental issues. While tools and methods for policy analysis will be treated, the overall intention of the course is to provide students with the scholarly background to think analytically, critically, and creatively across a variety of environmental policy contexts. Fall. Prerequisite(s): A graduate-level course in environmental policy.

EST 708 Social Theory and the Environment (3)
Three hours of seminar/discussion per week This course is an advanced graduate seminar that covers social theory related to the environment. Students will be exposed to foundational literature in environmental sociology in the first part of the course, after which other social science literatures will be explored that analyze the relationship between environment and society, such as Political Ecology, Environment and Citizenship, Environmental Governance, Geographies of Energy, Sustainability Indicators and Standards, Ecological Modernization, and Environmental Justice, among others. Environmental issues and scholarship from both industrialized and developing country contexts, and that represent a variety of social science disciplinary perspectives, will be discussed. Spring. Prerequisite(s): EST 600 or consent of instructor.

EST 759 Sustainability-Driven Enterprise (3)
Three hours of project meetings and/or workshops per week. CAS in Sustainable Enterprise capstone. Sustainable approaches to complex organizational challenges, opportunities: organizational, industry, stakeholder analysis, sustainability objectives, strategies, and metrics. Multidisciplinary team consulting project. At least 1X Fall or Spring. Prerequisites: EST 652/ECS 650/BUA 650 and ECS 651/BUA 651

EST 770 Regenerative Approaches to Sustainable Futures (3)
Three hours of seminar per week. A transdisciplinary approach to understand the interface of human and ecological systems, includes concepts and methods of ecologists, economists, and social scientists. Focus is on historical, conceptual and epistemological foundations. Draws on contemporary economic and policy thought, evolutionary biology, ecology, systems theory, social psychology, and environmental ethics. Spring.

EST 796 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies (1 - 3)
One to three hours of classroom instruction per week. Lectures and discussions, seminars, conferences and group research on advanced topics of special or current interest to environmental studies faculty and graduate students. Fall and Spring.

EST 797 Environmental Studies Seminar (1 - 3)
One to three hours of classroom instruction/discussion per week. Discussion of current topics and research related to environmental studies. Fall and Spring.

EST 798 Problems in Environmental Studies (1 - 3)
One to three hours of supervised individual activity per week. Individualized, special study of environmental studies subjects and issues. Students shall report their activities to their instructor on a weekly basis for the duration of the course. Comprehensive oral or written report required for some problems. Fall, Spring and Summer.

EST 898 Professional Experience (1 - 12)
Variable number of hours of professional experience per week. Professional experience which applies, enriches and/or complements formal coursework. Students shall report their activities to their instructor on a weekly basis for the duration of the course. Graded on an "S/U" basis. Fall, Spring, and Summer.

EST 899 Masterís Thesis Research (1 - 12)
One to 12 hours of supervised individual activity per week. Research and independent study for the master's degree and thesis. Fall, Spring, and Summer.

Course Numbering System

100-499: Undergraduate courses for which no graduate credit may be given.

500-599: Graduate courses designed expressly for areas of specialization in post-baccalaureate programs. Qualified undergraduate students may enroll by permission of the instructor.

600-699: Graduate courses designed expressly for advanced levels of specialization. Undergraduate students with a cumulative grade point average of 3.000 or better may enroll in these courses with an approved petition.

700-999: Advanced graduate level courses for which no undergraduate students may register. Shared resources courses, designated as 400/500 or 400/600, are designed when the topic coverage of both courses is the same. Separate course syllabuses are developed expressly differentiating the requirements and evaluative criteria between the undergraduate course and the graduate course. No type of cross-listing may be offered unless approved by the ESF faculty.