e s f home link - e s f college of environmental science and forestry
e s f home link - e s f college of environmental science and forestry

Subject to Change due to COVID-19

The current ESF Catalog is online only, and is updated as needed throughout the year. To view the version officially associated with a particular year of entry to the College, please refer to the appropriate catalog of record.

**Please note that certain classes are permitted to charge course fees that SUNY has approved. Please refer to the detailed list to see if a class you are interested in has a mandatory fee associated with it, and the amount of the fee. For a detailed listing, click here.

ESF Course Descriptions

MCR 480 Fundamentals of Microscopy (3)
Three hours of lecture/demonstration per week. Introduction to light microscopy, electron microscopy, atomic force, confocal, Raman, Near Field Optical, Correlative and other microscopic methods and their newest applications. Light microscopic techniques include brightfield, phase contrast, polarized light, Nomarski, Kohler illumination. Imaging and recording methods. Fall. Note: Credit will not be granted for both CME 480 and CME 680

MCR 484 Scanning Electron Microscopy (3)
Two hours of lecture/three hours of laboratory/ demonstration per week. Theory and operation of the scanning electron microscope, awareness of specimen preparation techniques, digital imaging, and interpretation of micrographs. Fall.

MCR 485 Transmission Electron Microscopy (3)
Two hours of lecture/ three hours of laboratory/ demonstration per week. Theory and operation of the transmission electron microscope including specimen preparation, photographic technique and interpretation of micrographs. Spring.

MCR 580 Microtechnique of Wood (3)
Three hours of laboratory per week. Instruction on the use of the sliding mcirotome to slice thin sections of wood for light microscopy and for sample surface preparation of wood for scanning electron microscopy. Care of the microtome blade, staining of wood sections and preparation of micrsocope slides. Fall or Spring

MCR 585 Light Microscopy for Research Applications (3)
Two hours of lecture/three hours of laboratory per week. Principles of light microscopy and photomicrographic digital imagery using Spot camera and Image Pro 7.0 software. Extensive laboratory component. Spring. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MCR 590 IT100 for Experienced Users (1)
Operation and theory of the IT100LA scanning electron microscope restricted to users with prior experience on a scanning electron microscope, and tailored to specific research needs of the user. Spring/Fall. Prerequisites: MCR 484, MCR 783 or equivalent prior SEM experience. Professor consent is required to register for this course.

MCR 680 Fundamentals of Microscopy (3)
Three hours of lecture/demonstration per week. Introduction to light microscopy, electron microscopy,atomic force, confocal, Raman, Near Field Optical, Correlative and other microscopic methods and their newest applications. Light microscopic techniques include brightfield, phase contrast, polarized light, Nomarski, Kohler illumination. Imaging and recording methods. Fall.

MCR 683 Operation of the Transmission Electron Microscope (3)
Two hours of lecture/ 3 hours of demonstration/laboratory per week. Theory and operation of the transmission electron microscope, including specimen preparation, digital imaging, and interpretation of micrographs.

MCR 783 Operation of the Scanning Electron Microscope (3)
Two hours of lecture/three hours of demonstration/ laboratory per week. Theory and operation of the scanning electron microscope, including specimen preparation, digital imaging, and interpretation of micrographs. Fall.

Course Numbering System

100-499: Undergraduate courses for which no graduate credit may be given.

500-599: Graduate courses designed expressly for areas of specialization in post-baccalaureate programs. Qualified undergraduate students may enroll by permission of the instructor.

600-699: Graduate courses designed expressly for advanced levels of specialization. Undergraduate students with a cumulative grade point average of 3.000 or better may enroll in these courses with an approved petition.

700-999: Advanced graduate level courses for which no undergraduate students may register. Shared resources courses, designated as 400/500 or 400/600, are designed when the topic coverage of both courses is the same. Separate course syllabuses are developed expressly differentiating the requirements and evaluative criteria between the undergraduate course and the graduate course. No type of cross-listing may be offered unless approved by the ESF faculty.