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Research

Knowledge Created...

Research at ESF is remarkably diverse, current and challenging, with contributions being made in fields like aquatic ecosystems, bioenergy, biotechnology, biodiversity, ecology, genetic engineering, nanotechnology, remote sensing, wildlife disease prevention and many others.

ESF is a leader in integrating the energy and excitement of research with the formal requirements of degree and certificate programs. A high percentage of undergraduates and virtually all graduate students participate in research activity as part of their educational experience.

The Office of Research Programs (ORP)

ORP is the central resource for the initiation, funding and management of all ESF research activity. We seek to stimulate, facilitate and highlight research, and we strive to make college research opportunities broad and achievable.


Featured Research

Chestnut Restoration Milestone

researchers with chestnut seedlings

Two new studies on the environmental impact of transgenic American chestnut trees provide evidence that the trees have no harmful effects on germinating seeds, beneficial fungi, or larval frogs that are dependable indicators of environmental quality.

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New Frog Found

atlantic coast leopard frogs

Months of old-fashioned scientific fieldwork — more than 2,000 surveys of chirping frog calls, hundreds of photos of individual frogs and tiny tissue samples taken from them — has helped define the range and unique characteristics of the recently discovered Atlantic Coast leopard frog.

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Unusual Molecule Discovered

Dave Kieber taking samples

Two ESF scientists are part of a research team that recently discovered an unusual molecule that is produced in the oceans by planktonic microalgae and bacteria. Dr. David Kieber of the Department of Chemistry and Ph.D. student Liang Chen worked on the project with collaborators from the Friedrich-Schiller University Jena in Germany. Their study was published in the prestigious science journal Nature.

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CCDR Receives Grant

Professors Holding Plant

A grant to engage teenagers on Syracuse's Near Westside as co-researchers to investigate issues impacting their neighborhoods was received by ESF's Center for Community Design Research. The proposal, submitted by Associate Professor Maren King in the Department of Landscape Architecture in collaboration with The Near Westside Peacemaking Project, was awarded the grant by the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), the federal agency responsible for the AmeriCorps program.

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Stephen Stehman in "Nature"

Guy with Tiger

ESF Distinguished Teaching Professor Stephen V. Stehman is co-author of a paper published today (Aug. 8, 2018) in the journal "Nature," in which he and his colleagues report on the analysis of 35 years of satellite data and provide the first comprehensive record of global land change dynamics between 1982 and 2016.

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Combating Age-related Illness

Student Outside in Snow

The State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) and Ichor Therapeutics are partnering to train graduate students in researching drugs that could combat age-related illnesses. The educational component will occur at ESF, where students will focus on biochemistry, chemistry or bioprocess engineering. Their laboratory research will primarily occur at the facilities of Ichor Therapeutics in nearby LaFayette, New York. Ichor is a pre-clinical drug discovery and development company that specializes in mechanisms of aging.

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What Species Is Most Fit for Life?

Professors Holding Plant

There are more than 8 million species of living things on Earth, but none of them - from 100-foot blue whales to microscopic bacteria - has an advantage over the others in the universal struggle for existence. In a paper published today (Jan. 8) in the prestigious journal Nature Ecology & Evolution, a trio of scientists from universities in the United States and the United Kingdom describe the dynamic that began with the origin of life on Earth 4 billion years ago.

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Genome Duplication

Guy with Tiger

Genome duplication - known scientifically as polyploidy - has long been known from plants. Theodosius Dobzhansky, an influential evolutionary biologist, observed in 1937 that the biggest difference between the evolution of plants and animals was polyploidy. In fact, many of the plants humans eat, such as broccoli, rice, corn and wheat, have experienced polyploidy during their evolution (sometimes called "paleopolyploidy"). But until now, scientists had limited evidence for this in animals.

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Rural Forest Loss

Student Outside in Snow

Americans are spending their lives farther from forests than they did at the end of the 20th century and, contrary to popular wisdom, the change is more pronounced in rural areas than in urban settings.

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